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Topic: Isabella


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  CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Isabella I
Isabella took a prominent part in this war; not only did she attend to the government of the kingdom, and provide for the support of the army while Ferdinand did battle at its head, but she repeatedly visited the camp to animate the troops by her presence.
Isabella the Catholic always show herself the protectress of Columbus, but she was also the protectess of the American aborigines against the ill-usage of the colonists and adventurers.
Isabella was no less the patroness of the great Cisneros in the reformation of the monasteries of Spain, a work which he accomplished under the authority of Alexander VI given by the Brief of March, 1493, and which anticipated the reform afterwards executed throughout the whole
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08177a.htm   (2106 words)

  
 Isabella Ford
Isabella argued that the emancipation of women and the emancipation of labour were strongly linked and that "socialists should support the struggle of women, just as women should support socialism."
Some suffragists disapproved of Isabella Ford's socialism but it 1907 it did not prevent her being elected to the executive committee of the NUWSS.
Isabella Ford, a life-long pacifist, was deeply concerned by the growing hostility between Britain and Germany.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /Wford.htm   (1505 words)

  
 Isabella
Isabella, on learning that she was to be sacrificed to a notorious wretch of inferior station, shut herself in her apartment and denied herself sleep and food for a day and night, praying to Heaven to spare her.
Isabella ordered the young miscreant to be publicly conducted as a prisoner by one of her alcaldes through the great 'square of Valladolid to the fortress of Arevalo, where he was detained in close confinement, all privilege of communication with the world being cut off.
Isabella dreaded the sea, and parted from her daughter Joan (who was to be the mother of two Emperors), with deep melancholy, increased by the recent death of her own mother, who, long before her death, had sunk into mental infirmities.
www.oldandsold.com /articles35/famous-women-7.shtml   (10326 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine
Isabella (1400 - February 28, 1453) was Duchess of Lorraine from 1431 to her death.
Isabella of Asturias, (1470–1498), queen consort, daughter of Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon, wife of Manuel I of Portugal.
Isabella of Portugal (1503-1539), queen consort, daughter of Manuel I of Portugal, wife of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Isabella%2C-Duchess-of-Lorraine   (846 words)

  
  European Voyages of Exploration: Isabella I
Isabella I, Queen of Castile, was born in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres April 22, 1453 and died a little before noon November 26, 1504 in the castle of La Mota, which still stands at Medina del Campo (Valladolid).
The year before Isabella had been living at Segovia, apart from the court, which resided at Toledo; after the conclusion of the pact she was at odds with her brother, the king on account of his plans for her marriage.
Isabella, as soon as she was left alone, journeyed to Valladolid, and from there sent loyal followers in search of Ferdinand, who had been proclaimed King of Sicily and heir of the Aragonese monarchy.
www.acs.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/eurvoya/isabella.html   (1478 words)

  
 Isabella I
When Isabella was still a teenager, she showed her wisdom by refusing the usurped crown that was offered to her while her brother Henry IV was still on the throne and proclaiming that she would not become queen while her brother was still living.
Isabella was actively involved in these wars and showed her strength of character by constantly visiting the troops and encouraging them in their labor.
Isabella was given the title Isabella the Catholic because of her extreme vision to purify the faith.
www.hyperhistory.net /apwh/bios/b2isabella1.htm   (743 words)

  
 Isabella of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Isabella was born in Paris sometime between 1288 and 1296, the daughter of King Philip IV of France and Queen Jeanne of Navarre, and the sister of three French kings.
Isabella and Mortimer left the French court in summer 1326 and went to William III, Count of Hainaut and Holland, whose wife was Isabella's cousin.
Isabella took the habit of the Poor Clares before she died on August 22, 1358, and her body was returned to London for burial at the Franciscan church at Newgate.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Isabella_of_France   (1365 words)

  
 Queen Isabella (washingtonpost.com)
She was Isabella, the daughter of Philip IV, King of France; he, Edward of Caernarvon, Prince of Wales, the son and heir of Edward I, King of England.
Under its terms, Philip was to give Isabella a dowry of 000, and once she became Queen of England, she was to have in dower all the lands formerly held by Eleanor of Castile, which were in the interim to be settled by Edward I on Marguerite; these amounted to 00 per annum.
Isabella would have been brought up to know exactly what was required of her as a daughter and as a wife, and she had before her the example of her mother, who was a queen in her own right.
washingtonpost.com /wp-srv/style/longterm/books/chap1/queenisabella.htm   (2183 words)

  
 Isabella D'Este and the Renaissance   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Isabella D’Este Gonzaga, Marchesa of Mantua, is the child of the Duke and Duchess of Ferrara, Eleonora and Ercole D’Este.
Isabella’s reputation as a great patron of the arts begins with the pictures she commissions for her first studiolo, a small room on the first floor of the castle in Mantua which is directly under the tower.
Isabella pays Titian the ultimate compliment by saying that “by his art he had made her look better than she ever had been in life.” This shows that while Isabella has valued art to be true to life and beautiful, she must prefer the beauty when it comes to her own likeness.
people.smu.edu /shulsey   (2272 words)

  
 European Voyages of Exploration: Isabella I
Isabella I, Queen of Castile, was born in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres April 22, 1453 and died a little before noon November 26, 1504 in the castle of La Mota, which still stands at Medina del Campo (Valladolid).
The year before Isabella had been living at Segovia, apart from the court, which resided at Toledo; after the conclusion of the pact she was at odds with her brother, the king on account of his plans for her marriage.
Isabella, as soon as she was left alone, journeyed to Valladolid, and from there sent loyal followers in search of Ferdinand, who had been proclaimed King of Sicily and heir of the Aragonese monarchy.
www.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/eurvoya/isabella.html   (1478 words)

  
 Isabella I. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
At the death (1474) of her half brother Henry IV of Castile, the succession to Castile was contested between Isabella and Juana la Beltraneja, who was supported by Alfonso V of Portugal.
Isabella and Ferdinand, known as the Catholic kings, ruled Castile and Aragón jointly.
Isabella bequeathed Castile to her daughter Joanna, with Ferdinand as regent.
www.bartleby.com /65/is/Isabella1.html   (356 words)

  
 Queen Isabella I
Isabella I was born on April 22, 1451 in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres.
Isabella once again showed her great abilities when she decided that Ferdinand and herself would equally rule the two Kingdoms.
Isabella not only made sure that the girls were well educated (which was unusual for that time), but also that they knew how to do such things as sewing.
www.ctspanish.com /legends/isabella1.htm   (1864 words)

  
 Isabella, II Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Isabella II (1830-1904) was queen of Spain from 1833 to 1868.
Born in Madrid on Oct. 10, 1830, Isabella was the daughter of Ferdinand VII of Spain and Maria Cristina of Naples.
Isabella's education had been meager; she could scarcely read and was by all accounts relatively ignorant.
www.bookrags.com /biography/isabella-ii   (455 words)

  
 Isabella
Isabella was born in Madrigal de las Altas Torras, Spain, the daughter of John II, King of Castile and Leon.
Isabella's marriage to Ferdinand of Aragon united Spain's two largest kingdoms and laid the foundation of the Spanish state.
They governed independently, however, and Isabella initiated a program of reform which reduced the power of her rebellious nobles, streamlined her government, and encouraged scholarship.
www.hyperhistory.com /online_n2/people_n2/persons6_n2/isabella.html   (124 words)

  
 Isabella Rossellini Photos - Isabella Rossellini News - Isabella Rossellini Information
Isabella is the daughter of Ingrid Bergman and of movie director Roberto Rossellini.
Isabella was the exclusive spokesmodel for the international cosmetics company, Lancome, in both the United States and Europe, from 1982-1996.
Isabella: (Commenting on the critics' response to her performance in "Blue Velvet") David Lynch came out of it a genius, and I came out of it a fat girl.
www.tv.com /isabella-rossellini/person/3671/summary.html   (411 words)

  
 Biography: Morra, Isabella di
Isabella was the third of 8 children born to Giovan Michele di Morra, Baron of Favale, and Luisa Brancaccio.
Isabella's life changed drastically in 1528 when her father fled the Kingdom of Naples and his holding, the castle of Favale in Basilicata, as a result of his having supported the invading French army against the emperor Charles V, formerly King Charles I of Spain.
In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Isabella's tragic life struck the imagination of critics to the point of obscuring the poetry itself, in part due to the highly personal and intimate nature of her verse, which encouraged an examination of her art in relation to her life.
www.lib.uchicago.edu /efts/IWW/BIOS/A0033.html   (1000 words)

  
 Isabella of Castile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Isabella was great-great-granddaughter of both Henry II of Castile and his half-brother Pedro of Castile and their respective wives (Juana Manuel of Castile and Maria de Padilla).
In addition to her sponsorship of Columbus, Isabella was also the principal sponsor of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba, the greatest military genius and innovator of the age.
Isabella and Ferdinand's achievements are remarkable - Spain was united, the crown power was centralized, the reconquista was successfully concluded, the groundwork for the most dominant military machine of the next century was laid, a legal framework was created, the church reformed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Isabella_I_of_Castile   (2611 words)

  
 Random House : Book extract from Isabella
Edward I privately instructed the Count to find out as much as he could about the personal attributes of Marguerite of France, including the size of her foot and the width of her waist.The Count reported back that she was 'a fair and marvellously virtuous lady', pious and charitable.
Under its terms, Philip was to give Isabella a dowry of £18,000, and once she became Queen of England, she was to have in dower all the lands formerly held by Eleanor of Castile, which were in the interim to be settled by Edward I on Marguerite; these amounted to £4,500 per annum.
Isabella was born into the most illustrious royal house in Europe.
www.randomhouse.co.uk /catalog/extract.htm?command=search&db=main.txt&eqisbndata=0712641947   (2416 words)

  
 Chicago ''L''.org: Stations - Isabella   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Isabella was the only intermediate stop built between Central and Linden in Wilmette.
It was probably assumed that few people would ride from Isabella to Linden at the end of the line just a few blocks away, and what few people did decide to board here could have their fares collected by the conductor.
Pulling away from Isabella on its way north to Linden, a four-car Evanston train of 4000s is trailed by car 4279 on September 17, 1969.
www.chicago-l.org /stations/isabella.html   (1930 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England: Books: Alison Weir   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It was not the confiscation of land of the nobles, nor the suspension of habeas corpus that motivated her, it was the suspension of her revenues and it seems to a lesser extent, her forced separation from the crown prince.
In 1308, Isabella, the twelve-year-old daughter of French King Philip IV, arrived in London to marry Prince Edward, the heir to the throne of England.
Isabella did lead an invasion of England that removed her husband and placed her son on the throne, but Edward was a tyrannical king.
www.amazon.com /Queen-Isabella-Treachery-Adultery-Medieval/dp/0345453190   (2013 words)

  
 Isabella
Isabella was born in Madrigal de las Altas Torres, Spain, on April 22, 1451.
Isabella was a devoted mother and a faithful wife, chaste and pious.
The Order of the Daughters of Isabella is a charitable organization of practicing Catholic women founded on the principle of its motto: Unity, Friendship and Charity.
www.kykofc.com /kentucky/koc_sites/int/isabella.htm   (811 words)

  
 ISGM The Museum: Isabella Stewart Gardner   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Isabella Stewart Gardner was also the visionary creator of what remains one of the most remarkable and intimate collections of art in the world today and a dynamic supporter of artists of her time, encouraging music, literature, dance and creative thinking across artistic disciplines.
Isabella Stewart was educated at private schools in New York and Paris.
Isabella Stewart Gardner is buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, in Cambridge Mass., between her husband and her son.
www.gardnermuseum.org /the_museum/isabella.asp   (1063 words)

  
 Shaken baby syndrome: 1,100 to 1,800 small children each year in the United States are victims   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Her head was swollen from the shaking, and doctors inserted a shunt to drain the brain of fluid.
After Isabella spent 12 days in the hospital, doctors said she would never be able to sit up by herself or even hold up her head.
Isabella Clark is now 4 1/2 years old, and she's able to walk and do many of the things that children are able to do, but it's much harder for her.
www.post-gazette.com /pg/05117/494622.stm   (1380 words)

  
 Isabella - Rehabilitation Services at Isabella
Isabella offers a comprehensive program of physical, occupational, speech, recreational and specialized rehabilitation therapies, delivered in our bright new suite by Isabella’s caring, compassionate bilingual rehab team.
Isabella’s Occupational therapy program uses state-of-the-art equipment and a personal care plan to increase range of motion, eye-hand coordination, and the ability to handle the activities of day-to-day living.
Isabella's speech therapy employs a variety of approaches, including individually tailored programs and repetition to help individuals with speech and hearing deficits.
www.isabella.org /rehab/rehab.htm   (352 words)

  
 Isabellas   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Isabella Stewart Gardner opened her Museum on January 1st, 1903 with a celebratory evening filled with music, art, gardens and a menu of… champagne and donuts.
Isabellas age 18 or over are required to show a valid ID to receive free admission (the Isabellas Free…Forever Museum Card is a promotional card and does not substitute for a valid ID).
Isabellas under the age of 18 may, but are not required to, show their Isabellas Free…Forever Museum Card; all visitors under the age of 18 years are admitted for free.
www.gardnermuseum.org /isabellas.asp   (847 words)

  
 Wired News: Blogger: Catch Me If You Can
Isabella's journal details her life on the run from an affluent European family with great power and reach.
Isabella, or someone claiming to be her, has defended herself in the discussion sections of many of the weblogs linking to her journal.
Isabella, contacted through e-mail, declined to be interviewed on the advice of her legal counsel.
www.wired.com /news/culture/0,1284,58754,00.html   (1014 words)

  
 STARTREK.COM : Detail
Isabella convinces the girl to take her on a tour of the ship, concentrating on forbidden areas like Engineering, the Bridge and the Ten-Forward.
Isabella coldly replies that when the "others" come, Clara and everyone else on the ship will die.
Later, Isabella says goodbye to Clara in her quarters, and the two pledge to always remain friends.
www.startrek.com /startrek/view/library/episodes/TNG/detail/68550.html   (552 words)

  
 Chapter ISABELLA <i>to</i> Isolt of I by Brewer's Readers Handbook
Isabella (The lady), a beautiful young girl, who accompanied her father on a chase.
Lady Isabella did as she was told, and the cook replied, “Thou art the doe that I must dress.” The scullion-boy exclaimed, “Oh, save the lady’s life, and make thy pies of me!” But the cook heeded him not.
Isabella or The Pot of Basil, a story from Boccaccio turned into verse by Keats (1820).
www.bibliomania.com /2/3/174/1119/14764/2.html   (549 words)

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