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Topic: Isthmus of Corinth


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In the News (Mon 15 Jul 19)

  
  Corinth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
To the west of the isthmus lies the Gulf of Corinth.
Greece Interstate 8A/ from Corinth to the boundary.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Corinth   (1130 words)

  
 Isthmus of Corinth
The Isthmus of Corinth is 20 miles (32 km) long and 4 to 8 miles (6 to 13 km) wide, and connects central Greece with the Peloponnesus.
The isthmus lies between the Saronic Gulf and the Gulf of Corinth[?].
The Gulf of Corinth, an inlet to the Ionian Sea, is 80 miles (130 km) long and from 3 to 20 (5 to 32 km) wide.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/is/Isthmus_of_Corinth.html   (153 words)

  
 CORINTH FACTS AND INFORMATION
Corinth, or Korinth (''Κόρινθος''; see also List_of_traditional_Greek_place_names) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus_of_Corinth, ''the'' original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
After the end of the Peloponnesian War, Corinth and Thebes, which were former allies with Sparta in the Peloponnesian League, had grown dissatisfied with the hegemony of Sparta and started the Corinthian_War against it, which further weakened the city-states of the Peloponnese.
Corinth is the second largest city in the periphery of Peloponnese (not icluding the city of Patras).
www.flowergods.com /Corinth   (1478 words)

  
 Isthmus of Corinth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow landbridge which connects the Peloponnesos peninsula with the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth.
The word "isthmus" comes from the name "Isthmus of Corinth" (and the nearby city Isthmia).
To the west of the Isthmus is the Gulf of Corinth, to the east the Saronic Gulf.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Isthmus_of_Corinth   (106 words)

  
 CORINTH - LoveToKnow Article on CORINTH
The territory of Corinth was mostly rocky and unfertile; but its position at the head of two navigable gulfs clearly marked it out as a commercial centre.
As an industrial centre Corinth achieved pre-eminence in pottery; metal-work and decorative handicraft, and was the reputed inventor of painting and tiling; her bronze and her pottery, moulded from the soft white clay of Oneium, were widely exported over the Mediterranean.
71,229), is situated on the Isthmus of Corinth near the southeastern recess of the Gulf of Corinth, 31/2 m.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /C/CO/CORINTH.htm   (5465 words)

  
 Corinth, Greek Mythology Link.
Corinth is as city at the western end of the Isthmus, joining the Peloponnesus to Boeotia.
Briareus assigned to Poseidon the Isthmus of Corinth and the neighbouring lands, and gave to Helius the height above the city (Acrocorinthus).
600 BC, as it is reported], during the reign of King Periander (Pyranthus) of Corinth, son of Cypselus 2, son of Eetion 4, Arion 2 of Methymna in Lesbos landed on Taenarum in Laconia (southern Peloponnesus), borne by a dolphin.
homepage.mac.com /cparada/GML/Corinth.html   (1188 words)

  
 Corinth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The city of Corinth was siutated on the Isthmus of Corinth, which joined the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
Corinth became a major center of commerce in the Roman province of Achaia.
In 29 BCE, Corinth was chosen as the administrative capital of the province, the seat of the Roman proconsul.
www.abu.nb.ca /courses/Pauline/images/Corinth1.htm   (129 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth was and is located in the Peloponnesus, near the narrow strip of land (the Isthmus of Corinth) which joins it to Central Greece.
Corinth increased its power during this time by expanding its territory; it established colonies in Corcyra and Syracuse, and gained control of the entire isthmus on which it was located.
Corinth was ruled by a family of nobles known as the Bacchiad family during the 8th and 7th centuries BC.
alpha.furman.edu /~mcknight/pap12.htm   (411 words)

  
 Corinth
Corinth was a place of great mental activity, as well as of commercial and manufacturing enterprise.
Corinth had three good harbors (Lechaeum, on the Corinthian, and Cenchrea and Schoenus on the Saronic Gulf), and Thus commanded the traffic of both the eastern and the western seas.
But when Athens, Thebes, Sparta and Argos fell away, Corinth came to the front again as the wealthiest and most important city in Greece; and when it was destroyed by Mummius in 146 bc, the treasures of art carried to Rome were as great as those of Athens.
holycall.com /biblemaps/corinth.htm   (1576 words)

  
 Isthmus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
An isthmus is a narrow strip of land, bordered on two sides by water, and connects two larger land masses.
The most famous isthmus is the Isthmus of Panama, which connects North America and South America.
Between 1895 and 1904, the Japanese navy blasted a ship channel (between one or two kilometers wide), through an isthmus of the single island between from the west, and Tsushima Strait on the east, permanently dividing the island into two islands.
www.northmiami.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Isthmus   (394 words)

  
 Articles - Corinth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
To the west of the isthmus lies the Gulf of Corinth, to the east lies the Saronic Gulf.
The Corinth Canal, carrying ship traffic between the western Mediterranean and the Aegean, is about 4 km east of the city, cutting through the Isthmus of Corinth.
lastring.com /articles/Corinth?mySession=bffefd3ca75c64b3fa67a80ad50...   (1570 words)

  
 Geographia: Peloponnesus
The city of Corinth was situated on the coast of Corinthian Gulf, at the western side of the isthmus.
Megara was a city situated on east side of the Isthmus of Corinth, a seaport to the Saronic Gulf.
Sicyonia was a region north of Argolis and east of the Isthmus.
www.timelessmyths.com /classical/peloponnesus.html   (3547 words)

  
 Corinth, Isthmus of --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Modern Greek Isthmós Korínthou, isthmus dividing the Saronic Gulf (an inlet of the Aegean Sea) from the Gulf of Corinth (an inlet of the Ionian Sea).
isthmus dividing the Saronic Gulf (an inlet of the Aegean Sea) from the Gulf of Corinth (an inlet of the Ionian Sea).
Its location on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow strip of land that separates the Peloponnesus from northern Greece, allowed it to control the traffic between north and south.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9026296?tocId=9026296   (885 words)

  
 Footsteps Day 14, Regent University, School of Leadership Studies, Virginia Beach, VA
Travel from Athens across the Isthmus of Corinth built in 1893, which spans the Gulf of Corinth and the Sardonic Gulf.
Corinth was one of the earliest and wealthiest city-states of Greece, founded around 1900 B.C., and reached its height around 700 B.C. as a cultural and commercial center.
Corinth was the city that inspired many of Paul's letters and the book of Galatians.
www.regent.edu /acad/sls/footsteps/2005/greece/day14.htm   (294 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Corinth, city, Greece, Greece (Greek Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Founded in 1858 after the destruction of Old Corinth by an earthquake, it was rebuilt after another earthquake in 1928.
Strategically situated on the Isthmus of Corinth and protected by the fortifications on the Acrocorinthus, Corinth was one of the largest, wealthiest, most powerful, and oldest cities of ancient Greece.
It was taken by the Ottoman Turks in 1458, and in 1687 was seized by Venice, which lost it to the Turks in 1715.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/CorinthGr.html   (410 words)

  
 Corinth Area with Cenchrea, harbor and canal (BiblePlaces.com)
The isthmus connecting the Peloponnese and mainland Greece is four miles wide and as early as the 6th century B.C., work was begun to dig a canal connecting the Corinthian and Saronic gulfs.
Cenchrea was the port for Corinth on the eastern side of the isthmus, and remains of the ancient harbor are visible in the water today.
The Corinth Canal from Space (Navis) Satellite photo of the Isthmus of Corinth.
www.bibleplaces.com /corintharea.htm   (426 words)

  
 Corinth at the Time of Paul's Arrival   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth, the capital of the province of Achaia, was a city of social, cultural, and religious diversity, including Jews.
Corinth was located directly south of the Corinthian Gulf, on the Peloponnesian side (southern Greece) of the Isthmus of Corinth
Corinth was prosperous enough to be named as one of the three economic centers of Greece by Plutarch, a writer of the second century.
gbgm-umc.org /umw/corinthians/city.stm   (1525 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Isthmus of Corinth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The land formation was originally named after the Isthmus of Corinth (and the nearby city Isthmia).
Temple of Apollo at Corinth Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Isthmus-of-Corinth   (295 words)

  
 Corinth Canal --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Opened in 1893, the canal is 3.9 miles (6.3 km) long and has a water depth of 26 feet (8 m); its width varies from a minimum of 69 feet (21 m) at the bottom to 82 feet (25 m) maximum at the water's surface.
Technically, this region, the Peloponnese, or Pelopónnisos, also known as the Morea, is now an island, for the 3.9-mile Corinth Canal cuts across the narrow neck of land formerly separating the Gulf of Corinth from that of Aegina (Aíyina).
It weaves across a strip of tropical land where the Isthmus of Panama narrows in the shape of a long flattened letter S. The fame of the Panama Canal is not in its size, for it is only about 51 miles (82 kilometers) long.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9026299   (1010 words)

  
 Corinth Canal and Diolkos
Isthmus of Corinth, as this narrow stretch of land is called, has played a very important role in the history of Greece.
There were times when the influence of Corinth extended beyond the Saronic Gulf to the Aegean Sea and beyond the Gulf of Corinth to the Adriatic.
The greater part of the Slipway, which in fact ran all the way from the Gulf of Corinth to the Saronic Gulf, was brought to light.
www.sailingissues.com /corinth-canal-diolkos.html   (794 words)

  
 Corinth, Gulf of
It is connected with the Saronic Gulf by the 4-mi (6.4-km) Corinth Canal (which cuts across the Isthmus of Corinth at sea level) and with the Gulf of Pátrai by the Ríon Strait, which is crossed by a 7,382-ft (2,250 m) cable-stayed bridge at Ríon.
Aetolia - Aetolia, region of ancient Greece, N of the Gulf of Corinth and the Gulf of Calydon, E of the...
Corinth, Isthmus of - Corinth, Isthmus of, c.20 mi (32 km) long and 4–8 mi (6.4–12.9 km) wide, connecting...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/world/A0813551.html   (198 words)

  
 Corinth on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
It became (224 BC) a leading member of the Achaean League and in 146 BC was destroyed by the victorious Romans.
Corinth was again laid waste by the invading Goths (AD 395) and by an earthquake in 521.
Diners travel to Dilworth's in Corinth, Mississippi, to pick up their tasty tamales and enjoy them in the car on the way home.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/C/CorinthG1r.asp   (761 words)

  
 Temple of Apollo at Corinth in Greece; home of Diogenes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth was an extremely wealthy city, owing its wealth to its position on the Isthmus of Corinth, which meant it had a port on both the Aegean Sea and the Ionian Sea.
Corinth was also the place where Diogenes had lived and worked, and the center of the cult of Aphrodite.
The Temple of Apollo in Corinth, one of the oldest stone temples in Greece, was completed in 550 B.C. Only seven of its 38 limestone columns remain.
www.padfield.com /2003/apollo.html   (161 words)

  
 Corinth, Isthmus of
Corinth, Gulf of - Corinth, Gulf of, inlet of the Ionian Sea, c.80 mi (130 km) long and from 3 to 20 mi (4.8–32...
Saronic Gulf - Saronic Gulf, arm of the Aegean Sea, indenting SE Greece and separated from the Gulf of Corinth by...
isthmus - isthmus, narrow neck of land connecting two larger land areas.
www.factmonster.com /id/A0813552   (201 words)

  
 Corinth, Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The Romans destroyed Corinth following a siege in 146 BC.
The Corinth Canal carrying shop traffic from the northern Mediterranean, and the Aegean is about 4 km east of the city.
It is the most famous beach along with Loutra Elenis 5 km NE of Corinth and 4 km north of GR-8A, E94.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/corinth__greece   (897 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Corinth, Isthmus of, Greece (Greek Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Corinth, Isthmus of, c.20 mi (32 km) long and 4–8 mi (6.4–12.9 km) wide, connecting central Greece (Attica and Boeotia) with the Peloponnesus, between the Gulf of Corinth and the Saronic Gulf.
It is crossed by the Corinth Canal, built between 1881 and 1893, which connects the Aegean and the Adriatic seas.
Parallel to the canal are ruins of the ancient Isthmian Wall, which was restored (3d–6th cent.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/CorinthIs.html   (222 words)

  
 MINISTRY IN CORINTH
One of the most strategic areas in all of Greece was the isthmus of Corinth.
Ports were built on either side of the isthmus and this served to further increase the prosperity of Corinth.
The Isthmus Games, held from times unremembered in the Colosseum of Corinth, were now re-instituted and brought athletes from all over the world.
www.angelfire.com /nt/theology/act18-01.html   (3731 words)

  
 Corinth, a City of Ancient Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Corinth established colonies at Corcyra and Syracuse in 733 BCE.
Cypselus (Kypselos) became the tyrant at Corinth in 657 BCE by overthrowing the government.
Periander was tyrant at Corinth from 625 to 585 BCE.
www.fjkluth.com /corinth.html   (339 words)

  
 Navis.gr - The Corinth Canal from Space   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The Isthmus of Corinth is 20 miles (32 km) long and 4 to 8 miles (6 to 13 km) wide, and connects central Greece (bottom left and bottom center of the image) with the Peloponnesus (upper right of the image).
The isthmus lies between the Saronic Gulf (upper left) and the Gulf of Corinth (center and right center).
The Corinth Canal (not discernible on the image), 4 miles (6 km) long, crosses the isthmus and connects the Adriatic and Aegean Seas.
www.navis.gr /canals/co_space.htm   (169 words)

  
 Rania Vassiliadou - Suggested Tours - Ancient Corinth
Visit Ancient Corinth 85 kms West of Athens, a city which was very prosperous in ancient times because of its position on a narrow isthmus between two gulfs.
See the canal which was constructed through the isthmus in 1893 and proceed to the ruins of the most important Roman township in Greece.
Visit Acrocorinth, the Acropolis of Ancient Corinth and an important fortress in medieval times, and enjoy the breathtaking view from the top of the hill.
raniavassiliadou.virtualave.net /3g.html   (133 words)

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