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Topic: Ivan III


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In the News (Mon 16 Oct 17)

  
  Ivan III of Russia - Slider
Ivan III Vasilevich (Иван III Васильевич) (January 22, 1440 – October 27, 1505), also known as Ivan the Great, was a grand duke of Muscovy who first adopted a more pretentious title of the "grand duke of all the Russias".
Ivan's refusal to share his conquests with his brothers, and his subsequent interference with the internal politics of their inherited principalities, involved him in several wars with them, from which, though the princes were assisted by Lithuania, he emerged victorious.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that Muscovy rejected the Tatar yoke.
enc.slider.com /Enc/Ivan_III   (1246 words)

  
  Ivan III - LoveToKnow 1911
Ivan's refusal to share his conquests with his brothers, and his subsequent interference with the internal politics of their inherited principalities, involved him in several wars with them, from which, though the princes were assisted by Lithuania, he emerged victorious.
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as hitherto, to the princes' heirs, put an end once for all to these semi-independent princelets.
It was in the reign of Ivan III.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Ivan_III   (1185 words)

  
 IVAN III VASILYEVICH,
Ivan strengthened the hegemony of Moscow over the other Russian principalities, and he described himself as Sovereign of All Russia.
Ivan invaded Lithuania in 1492 and again in 1500 and forced Alexander I (1461–1506), the ruler of that country and king of Poland, to cede (1503) a score of towns to him.
After his marriage Ivan added the two-headed eagle of the Byzantine escutcheon to his own coat of arms and, modeling his regime on that of the autocratic Byzantine rulers, curtailed the powers and privileges of the Russian princes and the Russian aristocracy.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=212988   (587 words)

  
 Ivan III — Infoplease.com
Ivan III or Ivan the Great,1440–1505, grand duke of Moscow (1462–1505), creator of the consolidated Muscovite (Russian) state.
Ivan was succeeded by his son, Vasily III.
Vasily III - Vasily III Vasily III (Vasily Ivanovich), 1479–1533, grand duke of Moscow (1505–33).
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0825702.html   (366 words)

  
 Ivan IV Vasilyevich - MSN Encarta
Ivan IV Vasilyevich or Ivan the Terrible (1530-1584), grand prince of Muscovy (1533-1584) and the first formally proclaimed tsar of Russia (1547-1584).
Ivan was the first child of Grand Prince Vasily III of Muscovy (the official name of the Russian state at that time) and his second wife, Elena Glinskaya.
Ivan left Russia an empire, thanks to the annexation of the non-Russian lands in the Volga region and areas east of the Volga in the Urals and Siberia.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/refarticle.aspx?refid=761561311   (1791 words)

  
 Ivan IV Vasilyevich - Printer-friendly - MSN Encarta
Ivan was the first Russian prince to take that title, which was intended to convey the exalted image of the ruler as the representative of God.
From 1547 to 1560 Ivan is believed to have governed with the aid of a talented group of advisers dubbed the Chosen Council.
In this program, begun by his grandfather Ivan III in the 1480s, the government confiscated privately held land in annexed principalities or set aside state property and turned it over to cavalrymen who pledged continual service to the tsar.
encarta.msn.com /text_761561311___6/Ivan_IV_Vasilyevich.html   (936 words)

  
 Ancestors and Family of Ivan IV the Terrible of Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ivan engaged in prolonged and largely unsuccessful wars against Sweden and Poland, and, in seeking to impose military discipline and a centralized administration, he instituted a reign of terror against the hereditary nobility.
On Jan. 16, 1547, Ivan was crowned "tsar and grand prince of all Russia." The title tsar was derived from the Latin title "caesar" and was translated by Ivan's contemporaries as "emperor." In February 1547 Ivan married Anastasiya Romanovna, a great-aunt of the future first tsar of the Romanov dynasty.
Ivan was a devout adherent of the Orthodox church.
nygaard.howards.net /files/4/3638.htm   (1760 words)

  
 Ivan The Terrible
Ivan IV, know as Ivan the Terrible, is most known for his brutal ruling, centralised administration of Russia and expantion of the boundaries of the Russian Empire.
Ivan justly deserved his reputation as a tyrant and his reign was peppered with battles with foreign invaders.
Although the transition from Ivan to his son and successor, Feodor I, was relatively easy and quiet, Moscow was, according to most observers, on the verge of anarchy as a result of Ivan The Terrible's policies.
www.2-russia.com /ivan-the-terrible.asp   (493 words)

  
 Russia - Muscovy
Ivan III was the first Muscovite ruler to use the titles of tsar and "Ruler of all Rus'." Ivan competed with his powerful northwestern rival Lithuania for control over some of the semi-independent former principalities of Kievan Rus' in the upper Dnepr and Donets river basins.
Ivan IV was crowned tsar and thus was recognized, at least by the Orthodox Church, as emperor.
Ivan strengthened the position of the tsar to an unprecedented degree, demonstrating the risks of unbridled power in the hands of a mentally unstable individual.
countrystudies.us /russia/3.htm   (2935 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - IVAN III., VASSILIVICH, THE GREAT:   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In his letter Beklemishev is instructed by Ivan to transmit to Kokos his credentials to the court of the khan and the regards of the grand duke.
Kokos is requested to discontinue the use of the Hebrew language in his further communications to the grand duke, and to use either Russian or Tatar instead.
Although there is no evidence of the existence of Jewish communities in Great Russia during the reign of Ivan, it seems certain that Jewish merchants from Kiev, Novgorod, and other towns were prominent in the commercial transactions of Moscow with Lithuania, the Orient, and the Crimea.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=377&letter=I   (304 words)

  
 Czarist Russia 1462
Ivan III and Vasily III ruled Russia in cooperation with the boyarskaya duma, a council of hereditary landed aristocrats (boyars).
Ivan IV's government was totally dependent upon the personality of the czar, and when Ivan died in 1584, having killed the son he had named as successor and leaving his feebleminded son Fedor and the infant Dmitry, he bequethed to Russia years of anarchy and civil war.
Ivan III, Vasily III, and Ivan IV The extent of Moscow-controlled lands was trebled during the reign of Ivan the Great (1462-1505).
www.lessonsite.com /ArchivePages/HistoryOfTheWorld/Lesson14/CzaristRussia.htm   (1385 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Muscovy
Ivan IV The development of the tsar's autocratic powers reached a peak during the reign of Ivan IV, and he became known as the Terrible (his Russian epithet, groznyy, means threatening or dreaded).
Ivan IV became grand prince of Muscovy in 1533 at the age of three.
Ivan defeated and annexed the Kazan' Khanate on the middle Volga in 1552 and later the Astrakhan' Khanate, where the Volga meets the Caspian Sea.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Muscovy   (3289 words)

  
 DiscoveringRussia - History: From Rurik to Ivan the Terrible
In 1328, the prince of Moscovy, Ivan I, was appointed grand-prince by the Khan.
Grand-Prince Ivan III (1462-1505) married the niece of the last Byzantine emperor in 1472 and adopted the Byzantine crest of the doubleheaded eagle for Russia.
Ivan ruled with a deep-seated paranoia and ruthlessness; it's said that he gouged out the eyes of the architects who built St. Basil's so that a cathedral of such beauty could never again be created.
www.discoveringrussia.com /histrurik.htm   (1353 words)

  
 Ivan III of Russia Summary
Ivan III Vasilevich (Иван III Васильевич) (January 22, 1440 – October 27, 1505), also known as Ivan the Great, was a grand duke of Muscovy who first adopted a more pretentious title of the "grand duke of all the Russias".
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as hitherto, to the princes heirs, put an end once for all to these semi-independent princelets.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that the new Russian Sudebnik, or law code, was compiled by the scribe Vladimir Gusev.
www.bookrags.com /Ivan_III_of_Russia   (1870 words)

  
 The Courtly Lives - The Princes of Novogrod and Moscow (7-11)
The sons of Vasily II were: Ivan III, Yury (died in infancy), Yury (died in 1473), Andrei, "the elder," (died in 1493), Simeon (died in infancy), Boris (died in 1494), Andrei "the younger" (died in 1481).
Ivan made a compromise since he needed their help with the Tartars, however, by his death, Ivan had control of all of Andrei's land and half of Boris's.
Anna Glinskaya, Ivan's mother-in-law was strangled for witchcraft.
www.angelfire.com /mi4/polcrt/MosPrinces2.html   (1509 words)

  
 The Terrible Ivan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ivan IV is a sinister and arresting figure in the history of the Russian Middle Ages.
Ivan gathered around him at the Alexandrov Monastery, which became his headquarters and residence, a picked bodyguard of three hundred oprichniks whom he clothed in monk's garb and whom he commanded as abbot.
The grand prince, become a tsar at the coronation of Ivan the Terrible, was customarily the oldest surviving son of the late ruler.
mars.wnec.edu /~grempel/courses/russia/lectures/09ivanIV.html   (2584 words)

  
 Ivan III of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ivan III Vasilevich (Иван III Васильевич) (January 22, 1440 – October 27, 1505), also known as Ivan the Great, was a grand duke of Muscovy who first adopted a more pretentious title of the "grand duke of all the Russias".
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as hitherto, to the princes heirs, put an end once and for all to these semi-independent princelings.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that the new Russian Sudebnik, or law code, was compiled by the scribe Vladimir Gusev.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ivan_III_of_Russia   (1363 words)

  
 "Ivan the Terrible..history, biography and pictures"
The chaos in which Ivan left the administration, the bitterly resentment of the boyars who had survived his purges, the sense of insecurity and fright felt by men of every class, the foreign enemies whose hatred of Russia Ivan's campaigns of pillage, torture, and desolation had sharpened--all compounded to leave the land weak and divided.
The grand prince, become a tsar at the coronation of Ivan the Terrible, was customarily the oldest surviving son of the late ruler.
Although Ivan IV claimed to rule by divine right and fought every check upon his authority, custom required the prince or tsar to seek the advice of the boyar duma which met frequently, sometimes daily, with the tsar presiding.
ring.mithec.com /sarir/tartars.html   (829 words)

  
 Ivan the III   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ivan III, born Jan. 22, 1440, was grand duke of Moscow from 1462 until 1505.
During Ivan's reign the declining Golden Horde made several attempts to reimpose its rule on Russia; in 1480, Ivan, repelling a Tatar invasion, finally freed Moscow from domination by the Tatars.
Following the marriage, Ivan developed a complicated court ceremonial based on the Byzantine model and began to use the title of tsar (a variation of caesar) After a long period of plots and rebellions by rival contenders for the throne, Ivan finally chose his eldest son by Sophia as his successor.
members.tripod.com /codim/rus/ivan3.html   (254 words)

  
 Tsar Ivan III
Ivan III, Grand Duke of Muscovy, son of Vasily Vasilievich the Blind, Grand Duke of Moscow, and Maria Yaroslavovna, was born in 1440.
From that point forward Ivan sought continually a pretext for destroying Novgorod altogether; but though he frequently violated its ancient privileges in minor matters, the attitude of the republic was so wary that his looked-for opportunity did not come until 1477.
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as before, to the prince's heirs, put an end once for all to these semi-independent princelets.
www.nndb.com /people/775/000097484   (1088 words)

  
 SuperDisk:Rambaud folder:RamMos02.html
Ivan III., whose reign of forty-three years was to permit him to realize the expectations of Russia, was a cold, imperious, calculating prince, the very type of the Souzdalian and Muscovite princes.
Ivan himself gave his daughter the most pressing injunctions never to appear in the Catholic church, and gave her minute directions as to her toilet, her table, her mode of travelling, and her way of conducting herself towards her new subjects.
Ivan entered into relations with Venice when Trevisani envoy of the republic, on his way to the Horde, tried to traverse incognito the States of the Grand Prince, and was arrested and condemned to death.
www.shsu.edu /~his_ncp/RamMos02.html   (5163 words)

  
 Heinkel III Bomber
German twin engined bomber the Heinkel III of the Luftwaffe shown in aviation art prints of the Heinkel III during the Battle of Britain by leading aviation artists Ivan Berryman and Anthony Saunders published by Cranston Fine Arts.
KG 27 was equipped with Henikel III befoer and during the Battle, using this type for most of the War - including operational service on the Eastern Front.
During the Battle of Britain, Gerhard completed 39 operational sorties (most of these being in the Heinkel III IG+BA, the subject of this aerofile) and was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class (EK II) 21st October, 1940, First Class (EK I) on 18th November 1940.
www.aviationartprints.com /heinkel_iii.htm   (2611 words)

  
 IVAN III - Online Information article about IVAN III
political existence to the readiness with which it assisted Ivan against its ancient enemy.
In 1487 Ivan reduced the khanate of Kazan (one of the offshoots of the Horde) to the condition of a See also:
Turkey, Ivan's relations were pacific and even alhicable.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /INV_JED/IVAN_III.html   (1495 words)

  
 EARLY COINAGE OF MOSCOW
Ivan III finally developed the notion of tsar and was in fact the first Russian Grand Prince to use that title.
First to "Grand Prince of all Russia" and then to "Sovereign of all the Russian lands." Ivan III was the first Russian ruler to call himself tsar but the title does not appear on his coins.
Ivan is usually called the founder of the Russian State but it is important to remember the firm foundation laid by his predecessors.
www.chicagocoinclub.org /projects/PiN/ecm.html   (4149 words)

  
 Ivan the Great
Ivan III Vasilevich, better known as Ivan the Great ruled from 1462-1505.
Ivan the Great united many of the previously autonomous provinces and succeeded in freeing Russia from the Mongols (Tatars).
Ivan the Great first subjugated the surrounding cities and then in 1480 refused to pay the tribute demanded by the Mongols.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/history/russia/ivanthegreat.html   (158 words)

  
 Coins & Medals of Imperial Russia: Ivan VI
Ioann (Ivan VI) lived on for some 23 years as a prisoner of the state until an unsuccessful rescue attempt caused his jailers to do away with him.
On December 31, 1741, a government decree directed the public to turn in the coins of Ivan VI within a year for an exchange of new coins at full value.
Ivan was the third Romanov of that name, but is regarded as Ivan VI by scholars.
www.library.yale.edu /slavic/coins/html/ivan6.html   (179 words)

  
 Ivan Asen III of Bulgaria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ivan Asen III was the son of Mitso Asen of Bulgaria and Marija of Bulgaria, a daughter of Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria and Eirene of Thessalonica.
Ivan Asen III and Eirene Palaiologina became the progenitors of the large and infuential family Asan (or Asanes) in the Byzantine Empire, which prospered in various court and provincial offices until the end of the empire and its dependencies in the mid-15th century.
One of Ivan Asen III's descendants, Eirene Asanina (daughter of his son Andronikos Asan) married the future Byzantine Emperor John VI Kantakouzenos and through their daughter Helena (who married emperor John V Palaiologos), became the ancestress of later Byzantine emperors.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ivan_Asen_III_of_Bulgaria   (506 words)

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