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Topic: Ivan III of Russia


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In the News (Thu 14 Dec 17)

  
  Ivan III of Russia - Slider
Ivan III Vasilevich (Иван III Васильевич) (January 22, 1440 – October 27, 1505), also known as Ivan the Great, was a grand duke of Muscovy who first adopted a more pretentious title of the "grand duke of all the Russias".
Ivan's refusal to share his conquests with his brothers, and his subsequent interference with the internal politics of their inherited principalities, involved him in several wars with them, from which, though the princes were assisted by Lithuania, he emerged victorious.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that Muscovy rejected the Tatar yoke.
enc.slider.com /Enc/Ivan_III   (1246 words)

  
  Ivan III - LoveToKnow 1911
Ivan at once seized upon this as a recognition of his sovereignty, and when the Novgorodians repudiated their ambassadors, he marched against them.
Ivan's refusal to share his conquests with his brothers, and his subsequent interference with the internal politics of their inherited principalities, involved him in several wars with them, from which, though the princes were assisted by Lithuania, he emerged victorious.
It was in the reign of Ivan III.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Ivan_III   (1185 words)

  
 Ivan III of Russia
Ivan has been referred to as the "gather of the Russian lands" and united most of the areas of Russia under his control.
Ivan's greatest conquests were the annexation rival Tver[?] and the conquest of Novogorod[?] with its important fur trade and massive northern territorial holdings.
Ivan defeated Lithuania in a long and costly war that finally ended Lithuania's long expantion and pushed it into an alliance with Poland that would eventually end Lithuania's independence.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/iv/Ivan_the_Great.html   (219 words)

  
 IVAN III VASILYEVICH,
Ivan strengthened the hegemony of Moscow over the other Russian principalities, and he described himself as Sovereign of All Russia.
Ivan invaded Lithuania in 1492 and again in 1500 and forced Alexander I (1461–1506), the ruler of that country and king of Poland, to cede (1503) a score of towns to him.
After his marriage Ivan added the two-headed eagle of the Byzantine escutcheon to his own coat of arms and, modeling his regime on that of the autocratic Byzantine rulers, curtailed the powers and privileges of the Russian princes and the Russian aristocracy.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=212988   (524 words)

  
 Ivan, III Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Ivan III (1440-1505), called Ivan the Great, was grand duke of Moscow from 1462 to 1505.
Ivan limited his allegiance to the Golden Horde to the sending of presents instead of regular tribute, finally discontinuing even those.
The marriage was sponsored by the Vatican in hope of bringing Russia under the sway of the Pope and of establishing a broad front against the Turks, a goal that failed.
www.bookrags.com /biography/ivan-iii   (530 words)

  
 History & Culture of Russia / The Mongols and the Emergence of Moscow
Invasions of Russia were attempted during this period from the west as well, first by the Swedes (1240) and then by the Livonian Brothers of the Sword (1242), a regional branch of the fearsome Teutonic Knights.
Ivan began by subjugating most of Moscow's rival cities, and by the time he tore up the charter binding it to Tatar tribute he was effectively in control of the entire country.
Ivan's Tatar campaigns opened vast new areas for Russian expansion, and it was during his reign that the conquest and colonization of Siberia began.
www.geographia.com /russia/rushis03.htm   (822 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as hitherto, to the princes heirs, put an end once and for all to these semi-independent princelings.
It was through her influence that the ceremonious etiquette of Constantinople (along with the imperial double-headed eagle and all that it implied) was adopted by the court of Moscow.
It was in Ivan's reign that the Christian rulers in the Caucasus began to see the Russian monarchs as their natural allies against the Muslim regional powers.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Ivan_III   (1384 words)

  
 Muscovite Russia
Ivan the Terrible succeeded Vasilii III and was the first Grand Prince to have himself officially crowned tsar.
Ivan IV was a member of the Russian Orthodox church and he offered prayers for those he had executed.
Ivan IV murdered his elder son and heir which resulted in his younger son Feodor succeeding Ivan IV to the throne.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/history/russia/muscovite.html   (1048 words)

  
 SuperDisk:Rambaud folder:RamMos02.html
Ivan III., whose reign of forty-three years was to permit him to realize the expectations of Russia, was a cold, imperious, calculating prince, the very type of the Souzdalian and Muscovite princes.
Ivan himself gave his daughter the most pressing injunctions never to appear in the Catholic church, and gave her minute directions as to her toilet, her table, her mode of travelling, and her way of conducting herself towards her new subjects.
In the same way as the end and aim of the policy of Ivan was the suppression of appanages, that of his code was to efface the privileges, the legal and judicial peculiarities of the different provinces.
www.shsu.edu /~his_ncp/RamMos02.html   (5163 words)

  
 Ivan III the Great
In 1480 Ivan, the Grand Duke of Moscow (1462--1505), renounced his allegiance to the Golden Horde who had ruled over most of Russia for several hundred years.
Ivan III united the Russian nation and strengthened the authority of the monarchy.
He assumed the title of 'Sovereign of all Russia', and adopted the emblem of the two-headed eagle of the Byzantine Empire.
www.hyperhistory.com /online_n2/people_n2/persons6_n2/ivaniii.html   (127 words)

  
 Our Homeland [The Voice of Russia]
Ignoring the traitors, Ivan III decided to confront the enemy even though Russia had seriously been weakened by years of internecine strife between Ivan and his two brothers who had appealed for help to the Polish King Sigizmund IV threatening this country with more years of feudal strife.
Ivan III was equally aggressive towards the Livonian Order making expert use of the potential carefully stocked up by his predecessors and which he himself had built up in his united Russian state…
Under Ivan III reign Russia was busily building up ties with the West, a priority that was much advanced by Ivan’s marriage to Zoe Paleologus, the niece of the last Emperor of Constantinople.
www.vor.ru /English/whims/home_008.html   (2079 words)

  
  Russia FAMOUS RUSSIANS
Russia's greatest poet Aleksandr Pushkin (1799–1837) was also a brilliant writer of prose.
Ivan Turgenev (1818–83) is noted for his sketches, short stories, and the novel Fathers and Sons.
Ivan Bunin (1870–1953) received the Nobel Prize in 1933 for his novels and short stories.
www.nationsencyclopedia.com /Europe/Russia-FAMOUS-RUSSIANS.html   (657 words)

  
  Ivan III of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It was in the reign of Ivan III that Muscovy rejected the Tatar yoke.
In 1487 Ivan reduced the khanate of Kazan (one of the offshoots of the Horde) to the condition of a vassal-state, though in his later years it broke away from his suzerainty.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that the new Russian Sudebnik, or law code, was compiled by the scribe Vladimir Gusev.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ivan_III_of_Russia   (1375 words)

  
 Tsar Ivan III
Ivan III, Grand Duke of Muscovy, son of Vasily Vasilievich the Blind, Grand Duke of Moscow, and Maria Yaroslavovna, was born in 1440.
Ivan's refusal to share his conquests with his brothers, and his subsequent interference with the internal politics of their inherited principalities, involved him in several wars with them, from which, though the princes were assisted by Lithuania, he emerged victorious.
Finally, Ivan's new rule of government, formally set forth in his last will to the effect that the domains of all his kinsfolk, after their deaths, should pass directly to the reigning grand duke instead of reverting, as before, to the prince's heirs, put an end once for all to these semi-independent princelets.
www.nndb.com /people/775/000097484   (1088 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Muscovy
Ivan IV was crowned tsar and thus was recognized, at least by the Orthodox Church, as emperor.
Ivan IV The development of the tsar's autocratic powers reached a peak during the reign of Ivan IV, and he became known as the Terrible (his Russian epithet, groznyy, means threatening or dreaded).
Ivan IV became grand prince of Muscovy in 1533 at the age of three.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Muscovy   (3289 words)

  
 The Rise Of Russia
The founder of Russian independence and unity was Ivan Vasilovitz (or Vassilivich), Ivan III of Russia, who, in the last half of the Fifteenth Century, attacked the Tartars, took Kazan, subdued Novgorod, freed his country from Tartar sway, and reunited the ancient dominions of Russia.
What Russia now is she owes largely to the persistent efforts of a most sagacious and enlightened man, who forced her, with tyrannical energy, from the jungle of barbarism into the paths of progress and civilization.
Fortunately for Russia, Charles proved himself, in his last campaign, to be as poor or as rash in strategy, as ignorant or as regardless of the real art of war, as he undoubtedly was an able tactician and daring soldier on the field of battle.
www.oldandsold.com /articles35/modern-europe-12.shtml   (2862 words)

  
 Czarist Russia 1462
Russia's modern period begins in 1462 with the growth of the Muscovy state and the power and influence of Ivan III and his descendants.
Ivan III and Vasily III ruled Russia in cooperation with the boyarskaya duma, a council of hereditary landed aristocrats (boyars).
Ivan IV's government was totally dependent upon the personality of the czar, and when Ivan died in 1584, having killed the son he had named as successor and leaving his feebleminded son Fedor and the infant Dmitry, he bequethed to Russia years of anarchy and civil war.
www.lessonsite.com /ArchivePages/HistoryOfTheWorld/Lesson14/CzaristRussia.htm   (1385 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - LEO:   (Site not responding. Last check: )
With the arrival at Moscow of the grand duke's second wife, Sophia Palæologus, niece of Constantine, the last Byzantine emperor (1473), active intercourse began between Russia and western Europe.
In 1490, when the brother of the grand duchess, Prince Andreas of Morea, and the Russian ambassador to Rome visited the court of Moscow, they brought with them, besides some artists and mechanics, a physician from Venice, named Leo.
Ivan Ivanovich, the son of the grand duke, had the gout; Leo, placing too much faith in his skill, assured the grand duke that he could effect a cure, and pledged his head in case of failure.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=185&letter=L   (254 words)

  
 Russia
Ivan III may be viewed as the first national ruler of Russia.
During the Mongol period, Russia was cut off from Western Europe and did not share in the cultural developments of the Italian Renaissance or the Reformation Period.
The modern history of Russia may be said to have begun with Ivan III, the Great.
faculty.ucc.edu /egh-damerow/russia.htm   (315 words)

  
 Russia Ivan IV - Flags, Maps, Economy, Geography, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International Agreements, ...
Ivan IV was crowned tsar and thus was recognized, at least by the Orthodox Church, as emperor.
Ivan IV The development of the tsar's autocratic powers reached a peak during the reign of Ivan IV, and he became known as the Terrible (his Russian epithet, groznyy, means threatening or dreaded).
Ivan strengthened the position of the tsar to an unprecedented degree, demonstrating the risks of unbridled power in the hands of a mentally unstable individual.
workmall.com /wfb2001/russia/russia_history_ivan_iv.html   (838 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - IVAN III., VASSILIVICH, THE GREAT:   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In his letter Beklemishev is instructed by Ivan to transmit to Kokos his credentials to the court of the khan and the regards of the grand duke.
Kokos is requested to discontinue the use of the Hebrew language in his further communications to the grand duke, and to use either Russian or Tatar instead.
Although there is no evidence of the existence of Jewish communities in Great Russia during the reign of Ivan, it seems certain that Jewish merchants from Kiev, Novgorod, and other towns were prominent in the commercial transactions of Moscow with Lithuania, the Orient, and the Crimea.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=377&letter=I   (304 words)

  
 Russia: News and Political, Historical, and Economic Information Related to Russia
Russia is the largest country in the world in terms of area, bordering the Arctic Ocean, between Europe and the North Pacific Ocean.
Ivan III (1462-1505) was able to refer to his empire as "the Third Rome" and heir to the Byzantine tradition, and a century later the Romanov dynasty was established under Tsar Mikhail in 1613.
Imperial decline was evident in Russia's defeat in the unpopular Russo-Japanese war in 1905.
www.russiannewsnetwork.com /russia-fed.html   (1807 words)

  
 Excerpts from
She had made Biron the regent for her infant son Ivan IV Anna's reign had been too much for Russia, and, in many ways, Russian tradition was mobilized, in the form of the palace guard regiments, to overthrow the German oligarchy and Ivan IX and install the Orthodox traditionalist Elizabeth on the throne.
Russia was to be reorganized on four administrative levels: the volost’ — a small unit sometimes translated as canton or township — the district, the province, and the country at large.
Russia faced her with a bit over 100,000, which is amazing given the inhuman number of wars Russia was forced to fight simultaneously.
www.holytrinitymission.org /books/english/third_rome_m_johnson.htm   (19315 words)

  
 The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Special Exhibitions: Byzantium: Faith and Power (1261–1557)
The white-bearded, halo-bearing one is Grand Prince Ivan III (1440–1505), the young one with a crown but no halo is his son Basil (1479–1533), and next to them, with arms crossed upon the chest, is Ivan III's young grandson Dmitrii Ivanovich (1483–1509).
Dmitrii's mother, Helena Stephanova, Ivan III's daughter-in-law, was the daughter of Prince Stephan of Moldavia.
Her major political rival was Ivan III's wife, Grand Princess Sophia Palaiologina, a descendant of the Byzantine imperial family.
www.metmuseum.org /special/Byzantium/g5_pop_3.R.asp   (913 words)

  
 Guggenheim Museum - Exhibitions - Russia! - Highlights
In 988, Grand Prince Vladimir of Kiev (reign 980–1015) was baptized and imposed Eastern Orthodox Christianity as the official religion of Kievan Russia.
At first the visual culture of Orthodox Russia followed the model developed in Byzantium, which was characterized by the icon, a flat panel painting depicting a holy being or object.
One of the most important subjects in Eastern Orthodoxy, the Dormition recounts the end of the earthly life of Christ’s mother, the ascent of both her body and soul of into heaven, her birth into eternal life, and her role as everlasting intercessor for humankind.
www.guggenheim.org /russia/highlights1.html   (481 words)

  
 Ivan III — Infoplease.com
Ivan III or Ivan the Great,1440–1505, grand duke of Moscow (1462–1505), creator of the consolidated Muscovite (Russian) state.
Ivan was succeeded by his son, Vasily III.
Vasily III - Vasily III Vasily III (Vasily Ivanovich), 1479–1533, grand duke of Moscow (1505–33).
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0825702.html   (366 words)

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