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Topic: Jamaican English


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  Jamaican English - Definition, explanation
Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of English encompassing in a very unique way, parts and mergers of both American English and British English dialects.
Jamaican is generally considered to be a Creole language /Creole.
Jamaican Standard and Jamaican Creole exist side by side in the island in a typical diglossic pattern (see diglossia).
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/j/ja/jamaican_english.php   (1206 words)

  
  Definition of Jamaican English
Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of English encompassing in a very unique way, parts and mergers of both American English and British English dialects.
Jamaican is generally considered to be a Creole language /Creole.
Jamaican Standard and Jamaican Creole exist side by side in the island in a typical diglossic pattern (see diglossia).
www.wordiq.com /definition/Jamaican_English   (1074 words)

  
  Jamaican Creole Information
Jamaican Creole, also known to foreigners as Patois/(Patwa) or simply Jamaican, is an English/African-based language --not to be confused with Jamaican English nor with the Rastafarian use of English-- used primarily on the island of Jamaica.
Jamaican is the descendant of a 17th century creolization process which, simply put, consisted of West and Central Africans acquiring and nativizing the vernacular and dialectal British Englishes (including significant exposure to Irish and Scottish varieties), with which their forced labour brought them in contact.
Jamaican Creole displays similarities to the pidgin and creole languages of West Africa due to their common descent from the blending of European substrate languages with African native tongues and, behind the barrier of very different accents, is actually mutually intelligible to many of them, such as Sierra Leone's Krio and Nigerian Pidgin English.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Jamaican_Creole   (1204 words)

  
  Jamaican English
Jamaican English, also known as Patois, is an English based creole language used primarily on the island of Jamaica.
Jamaican pronunciation and vocabulary are significantly different from most other English dialects, to the point where a native speaker of a non-Caribbean English dialect can only understand a heavily accented Jamaican English speaker if they talk slowly and forego the use of the numerous idioms that are common in Jamaican English.
Interest in Jamaican English outside of Jamaica was heightened by the proliferation of Rastafarianism and reggae and ska music throughout the world beginning in the 1960s.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ja/Jamaican_English.html   (162 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Patois   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Often these patois are popularly considered "bastardizations" of English or slang, however cases such as Jamaican are classified with more correctness as a creole language; in fact, in the Francophone Caribbean the analogous term for local variants of French is creole.
Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of English encompassing in a very unique way, parts and mergers of both American English and British English dialects.
Jamaican Creole, also known as Patois/(Patwa) or simply Jamaican, is an English/African-based language --not to be confused with Jamaican English nor with the Rastafarian use of English-- used primarily on the island of Jamaica.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Patois   (899 words)

  
 Jamaica Gleaner - Language rights, justice and the constitution - Sunday | January 27, 2002
Jamaican language versions of public documents could be prepared, not for direct use by the public but for public officials to read to members of the public with limited understanding of English.
Jamaican language signs could be made available when it could be ascertained that at least 10 per cent of the users of the services of public body desire such signs.
English is the official language, the language by which public authorities carry out their internal business and their communication with other official bodies and would continue to be so.
www.jamaica-gleaner.com /gleaner/20020127/focus/focus1.html   (1721 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Jamaicaans
JAMAICAN ENGLISH Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language...
The term is used primarily to refer to the formal speech of educated Jamaicans, but has also been used to refer to JAMAICAN CREOLE in authoritative scholarly works, such as the Dictionary of Jamaican English (1967, 1980).
Jamaican popular music that developed in the 1960s among Kingston's poor fls, drawing on American soul music and traditional African and Jamaican folk music and ska (a Jamaican and British dance-hall music).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Jamaicaans&StartAt=1   (379 words)

  
 Christian Mair: Research
The written language of Jamaica is English; its spoken language, is not simply English but a span of the continuum comprising English and the upper mesolectal range - even for the type of educated speaker envisaged as informant in the ICE guidelines.
Among the most interesting questions will be whether Jamaican English, the only variety in ICE with a Creole substrate, closely resembles natively spoken standards or whether it also shares some features with the second-language standards emerging in those former colonies in which English is an adopted official language.
Jamaican English pronunciation: an acoustic analysis of the spoken component of ICE-Jamaica.
www.anglistik.uni-freiburg.de /institut/lsmair/research.html   (951 words)

  
 Omnipelagos.com ~ article "Jamaican English"
Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of English encompassing in a unique way, parts and mergers of both American English and British English dialects.
Jamaican is generally considered to be a Creole language.
Jamaican Standard and Jamaican Creole exist side by side in the island in a typical diglossic pattern (see diglossia).
www.omnipelagos.com /entry?n=jamaican_%45nglish   (1071 words)

  
  English language at AllExperts
English was spread to many parts of the world through the expansion of the British Empire, but it did not acquire a lingua franca status in other parts of the world until the late 20th century.
English is an Anglo-Frisian language brought to south-eastern Great Britain (modern England) in the 5th century AD by Germanic settlers from various parts of northwest Germany (Saxons, Angles) as well as Denmark (Jutes).
English is the most widely learned and used foreign language, and as such, some linguists believe that it is no longer the exclusive cultural sign of 'native English speakers', but is rather a language that is absorbing aspects of cultures world-wide as it continues to grow.
en.allexperts.com /e/e/en/english_language.htm   (6043 words)

  
 Words in English :: Usage
English is the second or third most popular world language, as measured by the number of native speakers, which was around 402 million in 2002.
English is the first language of a large majority of the population in the United States of America, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (including England, Scotland and Wales), Ireland (Eire), Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Guyana, Jamaica, Antigua, Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Trinidad and Tobago.
English is also one of the primary languages of Belize (with Spanish), Cameroon (with French and African languages), Dominica, St. Lucia and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (with French Creole), the Federated States of Micronesia, and Liberia (with African languages).
www.ruf.rice.edu /~kemmer/Words04/usage   (818 words)

  
 Global Exchange : language
Today Jamaican is spoken throughout the country, as well as in neighborhoods of the Jamaican Diaspora in New York, London, Toronto, etc. It is important to note, however, that English is still the so-called "official" language of Jamaica.
Jamaican writer and researcher Velma Pollard (see suggested reading)explains in her book Dread Talk, three main categories in which rastas use language as a vehicle for mental and spiritual emancipation.
Any English speaker confronted with real Jamaican for the first time will know --mostly because he or she has no idea what the Jamaican speaker just said --that this is not English they are dealing with.
www.globalexchange.org /countries/americas/jamaica/language.html   (1417 words)

  
 Jumieka Langwij/Jamaican Language
The speech of the average Jamaican is variously described as a patois or creole, or even as bad English, depending on the degree of pride or disdain of the describer.
Jamaicans' attitudes themselves are very divided over the language they all speak most, if not all, of the time.
Although English is the official language of the country, and a variant known as Jamaican English is acknowledged, it is mostly heard only in formal situations, unless one wants to impress with "speaky-spoky." Common usage ranges from Jamaican English to broad patois with about three degrees of separation, often within a single speaker's conversation.
www.geocities.com /yotaino/langwij.html   (1130 words)

  
 Jamaican Patois and the Power of
Early Modern English was brought to the Caribbean by sailors, soldiers, indentured servants, convicts, and settlers (lower-class whites) in the form of regional and non-standard dialects.
Jamaican patois continues to be considered an unacceptable official language and an informal language not to be used for any formal purpose.
The similarity of Creole to English has led Creole speakers to be labeled as socially and linguistically inferior, although Jamaica Creole is increasingly showing up in newspapers, once known for their old-fashioned Standard English, on the radio, and in songs (Sebba 1, 1996 and Freed, 1993).
debate.uvm.edu /dreadlibrary/herbold.html   (4352 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 14.2505: Socioling, Jamaican English: Christie
English is expected wherever written language is required and for all formal oral communication.
Thus, Jamaicans need to be proficient in English for full participation in their own society as well as on the international stage.
The majority of Jamaicans use this variety in everyday communication with each other, but even its speakers consider it to be a debased form of English, something of which one should be ashamed, and an obstacle to progress.
www.linguistlist.org /issues/14/14-2505.html   (572 words)

  
 Jamaica Gleaner - 'Jamaican' is not a language - Wednesday | November 26, 2003
For the pre-emancipation freedmen there was no national educational structure to benefit from, and such was to be the case for the ex-slaves in the early emancipation period.
And what is to be emphasised is that degraded English is used and resorted to at every single level of society in Jamaica, and the handful of people who lament this have as much chance of seeing change as Jack and Jill had climbing that hill in search of water.
A Jamaican travelling abroad today, if asked at the frontier what is his or her language, will unhesitatingly say English, not Jamaican, for such doesn't exist and whatever exists isn't marketable.
www.jamaica-gleaner.com /gleaner/20031126/news/news9.html   (983 words)

  
 Jamaican English - InformationBlast
Jamaican English, also known as Patois, is an English-based Creole language used primarily on the island of Jamaica.
Jamaican pronunciation and vocabulary are significantly different from most other English dialects.
It is to the point where a native speaker of a non-Caribbean English dialect can only understand a heavily accented Jamaican English speaker if they talk slowly and forego the use of the numerous idioms that are common in Jamaican English.
www.informationblast.com /Jamaican_English.html   (176 words)

  
 HLW: Word Forms: Processes: English Accents
English is the native language of much of the Caribbean, with some features common to the region and others specific to particular islands.
So in the English of South Asians (Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Sri Lankans, Nepalese, Bhutanese, and Maldivians), the alveolar consonants /t/, /d/, /n/, and /l/ tend to be replaced by retroflex consonants, an important place of articulation for consonants in the languages of this region.
One very noticeable difference between English accents is in the details of how these dimensions interact with the structure and the meanings of sentences, that is, in their intonation.
www.indiana.edu /~hlw/PhonProcess/accents.html   (5787 words)

  
 Jamaican Creole
The consequences of this cultural confusion are well-known: English and African words were mingled with African syntax, phonology and rhythm, and the Jamaican creole developed-an un-English English unintelligible to the slave masters, an effective act of resistance that was at first invisible.
Regarding the situation in English schools, Ansel Wong states that by adopting such a dogmatic attitude towards patois and by refusing to legitimize its use as a language in its own right, schools negate the fl child's linguistic competence.
The effect of this is that the teaching of English in most schools has become a process of dismantling the child's competence rather than adding a second language to his London Jamaican dialect.
www.fb10.uni-bremen.de /anglistik/kerkhoff/DubPoetry/Contexts/JamaicanCreole.html   (1087 words)

  
 Jumieka Langwij: Kwuot/Jamaican Language: Quotes
The use of Standard English for official and formal discourse is not incompatible, after all, with the common usage of a tongue created by the Jamaican people over three hundred years for their own use and to describe their own reality.
It is a point deliberately missed by a school of thought that would seek to deny to Jamaicans the capacity to exercise their creative imagination and intellect in ways that produce things of value distinctive and different from what was regarded as 'high culture' coming from the imperial metropole.
The refusal to recognise Jamaican as a tool through which our children may gain information about the world is tragic, not only because it devalues their primary means of accessing information, but also because it fails to appreciate the role of that language in the successful acquisition of their second, English.
www.geocities.com /yotaino/wademase.html   (3459 words)

  
 Jamaican English   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The aim of this study is to describe some of the variations of Jamaican English and see to what extent it differs from the Standard West Indian English described by Crystal (1995) and by Roberts (1988).
This study includes a brief summary of Jamaican history with especial emphasis on the linguistic aspects, a description of West Indies English and of the Jamaican suprasegmental features, and an analysis of an interview with Bob and Rita Marley.
According to Roberts (1988) there are two main groups of varieties in Jamaica: "foreign Englishes" (including American, British and other varities used to communicate with the tourists and in some TV programmes) and a continuum of varieties with Jamaican English at one end and the creole language spoken in the rural areas at the other.
www.fut.es /~apym/students/jamaica.html   (2907 words)

  
 Patois   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The slave traders and owners spoke English while the slaves spoke a variety of African languages and the slaves had to assimilate by learning English which explains why much of the vocabulary is English in origin.
In Jamaica, in addition to the Jamaican patois of the roots, the development of Rastafarianism has caused Rastas to develop a language and vocabulary of their own (Nicholas, 1996, p.38), and for the purpose of this paper it will be referred to as Rasta talk.
When she was teaching English to young children who came from Patois speaking backgrounds, she would write a sentence in Patois and then next to it, the same sentence in "Standard" English, to help the children understand what the sentence means and to help them learn how to read and write.
www.reggaemovement.com /History/patois.htm   (3725 words)

  
 Jamaica's Language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
English dominates Patois, but the grammar and vocabulary are far removed from today's standard English.
Jamaican Patois did not evolve as a written language but is now often written in novels, plays, anancy tales, and songs.
If a Jamaican says something is a chain or two down the road, it is not in reference to a supermarket chain.
ptyme.tripod.com /jam8.html   (955 words)

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