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Topic: James Clerk Maxwell


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  Who Was James Clerk Maxwell?
James Clerk Maxwell has recently been hailed as the No 1 Scientist in a National Library of Scotland poll, and the 4th most important topic in Scotland’s History by a BBC poll.
James Clerk Maxwell was one of the greatest scientists who have ever lived.
On the 13th June 1831 James Clerk Maxwell was born in Edinburgh, at 14 India Street, a house built for his father in that part of Edinburgh's elegant Georgian New Town which was developed after the Napoleonic Wars.
www.maxwellyear2006.org /html/who_was_maxwell_.html   (416 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell related papers and essays etc
James Clerk Maxwell related papers and essays etc
List of Books and Scientific Papers written by JCM, including those not in Collected Works by Niven, Sir W D (editor) (1890) The scientific papers of James Clerk Maxwell, Cambridge University Press.
Obituary Tributes to JCM by (1) Professor P. Tait in Trans.
www.clerkmaxwellfoundation.org /html/further_documents.html   (413 words)

  
  James Clerk Maxwell Foundation
The James Clerk Maxwell Foundation is also marking this anniversary by offering a prize for the first solution to each of the outstanding questions on the Smith’s Prize Paper set by James Clerk Maxwell in 1879.
The James Clerk Maxwell Foundation was formed in Scotland in 1977 to honour one of the greatest scientists who has ever lived: James Clerk Maxwell.
In 1993 the Foundation acquired James Clerk Maxwell's birthplace in Edinburgh.
www.clerkmaxwellfoundation.org   (346 words)

  
  James Clerk Maxwell - MSN Encarta
Maxwell drew an analogy between the behavior of the lines of force and the flow of a liquid, deriving equations that represented electric and magnetic effects.
Maxwell's other major contribution to physics was to provide a mathematical basis for the kinetic theory of gases, which explains that gases behave as they do because they are composed of particles in constant motion.
Maxwell built on the achievements of German physicist Rudolf Clausius, who in 1857 and 1858 had shown that a gas must consist of molecules in constant motion colliding with each other and with the walls of their container.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761558820/Maxwell_James_Clerk.html   (1726 words)

  
  James Clerk Maxwell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James Clerk Maxwell (13 November 1831 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh.
Maxwell developed a set of equations expressing the basic laws of electricity and magnetism as well as the Maxwell distribution in the kinetic theory of gases.
In 1854, Maxwell graduated with a degree as second wrangler in mathematics from Trinity (scoring second-highest in the mathematics exam) and was declared equal with the senior wrangler of his year in the higher ordeal of the Smith's prize examination.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_Clerk_Maxwell   (2146 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Maxwell's first major contribution to science was a study of the planet Saturn's rings, the nature of which was much debated.
Maxwell's most important achievement was his extension and mathematical formulation of Michael Faraday's theories of electricity and magnetic lines of force.
Maxwell also calculated that the speed of propagation of an electromagnetic field is approximately that of the speed of light.
www.phy.hr /~dpaar/fizicari/xmaxwell.html   (389 words)

  
 ipedia.com: James Clerk Maxwell Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
James Clerk Maxwell was a Scottish physicist, born in Edinburgh.
The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is the largest astronomical telescope in the world, with a diameter of 15 meters, (designed specifically to operate in the submillimeter wavelength region of the spectrum) and named in his honor.
In 1854, Maxwell graduated with a degree as second wrangler in mathematics from Trinity College, Cambridge (scoring second-highest in the mathematics exam) and was declared equal with the senior wrangler of his year in the higher ordeal of the Smith's prize examination.
www.ipedia.com /james_clerk_maxwell.html   (2092 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell and the Christian Proposition
Maxwell's formulation of electromagnetic theory in differential form and his championing of the fundamental nature of the field in contrast to the action-at-a-distance theories of his day is, of course, the basis of essentially all of modern physics.
Maxwell was strongly influenced by Frederick Denison Maurice, a former "Apostle" and the founder of the Christian Socialist movement.
Maxwell had become a public figure, even though his science was still greatly under-appreciated, and so it was not surprising that he was consulted for example by the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol, about his ideas relating his faith and science[19].
silas.psfc.mit.edu /Maxwell/maxwell.html   (5814 words)

  
 JAMES CLERK MAXWELL - LoveToKnow Article on JAMES CLERK MAXWELL   (Site not responding. Last check: )
(1831-1879), British physicist, was the last representative of a younger branch of the wellknown Scottish family of Clerk of Penicuik, and was born at Edim~burgh on the I3th of November 1831.
The first paper of Maxwells in which an attempt at an admissible physical theory of electromagnetism was made was communicated to the Royal Society in 1867.
In private life Clerk Maxwell was one of the most lovable of men, a sincere and unostentatious Christian.
39.1911encyclopedia.org /M/MA/MAXWELL_JAMES_CLERK.htm   (1112 words)

  
 James Clark Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the thirteenth of November in 1831.
Maxwell's most important achievement was in his extension and mathematical formulation of Michael Faraday's theories of electricity and magnetic lines of force.
Maxwell's theory is a unification that remains one of the greatest landmarks in the whole of science.
www.studyworld.com /james_clark_maxwell.htm   (886 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell (1831 - 1879) was a 19th century Scottish physicist who demonstrated that electric and magnetic forces are two aspects of electromagnetism.
Maxwell codified earlier work on electricity and magnetism by Michael Faraday, Andre Marie Ampere, and others into a linked set of twenty differential equations in quaternions, the same mathematical system used later by Einstein for the relativity theory.
Maxwell's Laws describe the nature of static and moving electric and magnetic charges, and the relationship between the two, namely electromagnetic induction.
www.rare-earth-magnets.com /magnet_university/james_clerk_maxwell.htm   (311 words)

  
 Maxwell's House
James Clerk Maxwell was born on 13th June 1831 in Edinburgh at 14 India Street, a house built for his father in that part of Edinburgh's elegant Georgian New Town which was built after the Napoleonic Wars.
Their son James Clerk Maxwell was born in the house at 14 India Street and he would eventually inherit the house on the death of his father, retaining the house throughout his life.
James Clerk Maxwell's father had prepared his son well for education in many ways but, to send him to the Academy dressed in the country clothes he would have worn at Glenlair, shows a lack of understanding of how James's fellow pupils would react.
www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/HistTopics/Maxwell_House.html   (3549 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell - Maxwell Year 2006
James Clerk Maxwell has recently been hailed as the No 1 Scientist in a National Library of Scotland poll, and the 4th most important topic in Scotland’s History by a BBC poll.
James Clerk Maxwell himself (in 1864) said: “We have strong reason to conclude that light itself - including radiant heat and other radiation, if any - is an electromagnetic disturbance in the form of waves propagated through the electro-magnetic field according to electro-magnetic laws.”
- James Clerk Maxwell was placed 4th by the public vote in ‘Scotland's History - The Top Ten’, a BBC Scotland TV series, which took stock of Scotland's past to define the top 10 events that have shaped our nation.
www.maxwellyear2006.org   (893 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell Science Centre, Edinburgh Academy
James Clerk Maxwell was such a man, recognised throughout the world as one who transformed scientific thinking.
There are three laboratories specifically dedicated to chemistry in the James Clerk Maxwell Science Centre as well as a preparation and storage room, but all nine laboratories in the new building can be used for any of the three science subjects as and when the need arises.
James Clerk Maxwell is a giant in the history of science.
www.edinburghacademy.org.uk /curriculum/chemistry/sciencecentre.htm   (951 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Scottish physicist and mathematician James Clerk Maxwell was born November 13, 1831, the year that Samuel F.B. Morse first conceived the telegraph, and he died in Cambridge on November 5, 1879, the year that Thomas Edison was doing his first early work to invent the light bulb.
James Forbes "for it was not thought proper for a boy in a round jacket to mount the rostrum there." As a young man, Maxwell was something of a nerd.
But Maxwell's ether, or "sea of space," made it possible for scientists and engineers who followed Maxwell to think of "waves," a move that gave them the imaginative model they needed to proceed with the experiments in electromagnetism that led to the wireless telegraph, radio, television, radar and the laser.
www.webstationone.com /fecha/max.htm   (497 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell
His “Maxwell’s law” is considered one of the ten mathematical formulas which changed the face of the earth.
James Clerk Maxwell was born in Edinburgh, and his family moved to Glenlair in Kirkcudbrightshire, near Dumfries, when he was just over two years old.
Maxwell explored the earlier work thoroughly, repeating many of Cavendish’s experiments, and produced “The Electrical Researches of the Honourable Henry Cavendish” in 1879, a volume considered a cornerstone in the history of electricity.
www.clanmaxwellusa.com /clerkmax.htm   (1140 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Maxwell was only fourteen when a paper he’d written was presented to the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
Although Maxwell’s interests ran from poetry to the question of why a cat will always land on its feet, it was his work in mathematics and physics that paved the way for scientists and discoveries of the future.
Maxwell was married to Katherine Mary Dewar in June 1859.
www.tartans.com /articles/famscots/jamesmaxwell.html   (145 words)

  
 Biography - James Clerk Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on June 13, 1831.
Maxwell's major aim in his research on electricity and magnetism was to produce the mathematical framework underlying Faraday's experimental results and his ideas on field theory.
Maxwell was elected to the Royal Society in 1861, a prestigious association of scientists, as a result of his early work on electromagnetism.
www.answersingenesis.org /home/area/bios/jc_maxwell.asp   (1923 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879)
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879), Scottish physicist, widely considered by twentieth and twenty-first century physicists to have been one of the most significant figures of the nineteenth century.
James Clerk Maxwell was born in Edinburgh on June 13th 1831, into a modestly wealthy Scottish family.
Maxwell suggested that magnetic action could be explained by considering the lines of magnetic force around a magnet as if they were vortices within a continuous fluid medium.
www.thecore.nus.edu.sg /landow/victorian/science/maxwell1.html   (1764 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell was born at 14 India Street in Edinburgh, a house built by his parents in the 1820s, but shortly afterwards his family moved to their home at Glenlair in Kirkcudbrightshire about 20 km from Dumfries.
Maxwell was not dux of the Edinburgh Academy, this honour going to Lewis Campbell who later became the professor of Greek at the University of St Andrews.
Maxwell travelled to Edinburgh for the Easter vacation of 1856 to be with his father and the two went together to Glenlair.
www.shsu.edu /~icc_cmf/bio/maxwell.html   (2519 words)

  
 James Clerk Maxwell Foundation
With the acquisition of the house in which Clerk Maxwell was born, in the New Town of Edinburgh, the work of the Foundation entered a new phase in which its commemorative function predominated.
The James Clerk Maxwell Foundation is not an American foundation; it was founded and funded by a native of Scotland, who resides most of the year in the United States.
The portrait of John Clerk Maxwell, father of James Clerk Maxwell and original owner of 14 India Street, is a copy, courtesy of Sir John Clerk, of the original at Penicuik House, by Sir John Watson Gordon.
www.sbrow.plus.com /pages/maxwell1.html   (1784 words)

  
 J.C. Max, Inc. - About James Clerk Maxwell   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This image of Maxwell was digitized from an engraving by G. Stodart from a photograph by Fergus of Greenock.
James Clerk Maxwell's supreme contribution to physics, his characterization of the mathematical laws that govern electromagnetic phenomena, gained acceptance only slowly from his peers.
Maxwell wrote a considerable quantity of verse for which he is not widely known.
www.jcmax.com /maxwell2.html   (312 words)

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