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Topic: James II


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  James II of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460.
James was son of James I of Scotland and Joan Beaufort, daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and Margaret Holland.
But James' patronage of lands, titles and office to allies of the Douglases saw their allies begin to change sides, most tellingly the Earl of Crawford, and in 1455 James was finally able to make a decisive blow against the Douglases, and they were finally defeated at the battle of Arkinholm in May 1455.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_II_of_Scotland   (1009 words)

  
 James II of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685.
James, the second surviving son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France, was born at St.
Charles II was recognised by the Parliaments of Scotland and Ireland, and was crowned at Scone, in Scotland, in 1651.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_II_of_England   (2593 words)

  
 Famous Scots- King James II of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Another James in the line of Stewart Kings was born on October 16, 1430, to King James I and Joan Beaufort at Holyrood in Edinburgh, Scotland.
In February 1437, King James I was murdered in a plot to overthrow the crown.
In 1460, James II used the excuse of the York patronage and the still quite annoying ninth Earl of Douglas (he had fled to England) to attack Roxburgh Castle.
www.tartans.com /articles/famscots/stewartjamesII.html   (731 words)

  
 James II, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
As the young duke of York James was surrendered (1646) to the parliamentary forces at the end of the first civil war, but he escaped (1648) to the Continent and served in the French (1652–55) and Spanish (1658) armies.
James consented to the marriage (1677) of his daughter Mary (later Mary II) to the Protestant prince of Orange (later William III), and the couple became the heirs presumptive, after James, to the English throne.
James made an effort to restore himself by landing in Ireland in 1689 and leading his many Catholic followers there, but the effort failed at the battle of the Boyne (1690).
www.bartleby.com /65/ja/James2Eng.html   (645 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Stewarts > James II
James II was crowned in Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh in 1437, the first king not to be enthroned at Scone since Kenneth MacAlpin (843-58).
James' minority was dominated by the struggles of rival families for power in the realm and control of the king.
Known as 'James of the Fiery Face' because of a birthmark, he began to rule for himself when he was 18, soon after his marriage in July 1449 to Mary of Gueldres, a devout and cultivated Burgundian lady.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page129.asp   (289 words)

  
 James II (of England)
In 1660 James married Anne Hyde (1637–1671; mother of Mary II and Anne) and in 1673 Mary of Modena (mother of James Edward Stuart).
James fled to France, then led an uprising in Ireland in 1689, but after defeat at the Battle of the Boyne (1690) remained in exile in France.
James had no male heir by his marriage to Anne Hyde, but in June 1688 Mary of Modena gave birth to a son.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0020037.html   (450 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
James II was born in 1633, the third son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria.
James was deposed in 1688, and died from a cerebral hemorrhage in 1701.
James, haunted by recollections of Richard II and Henry IV, chose to flee London rather than be captured.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon50.html   (525 words)

  
 James II
James was a pawn and a prisoner in the hands of the competing Scots lords, all of whom wished to rule through him.
James was charmed by them but at the feast they were murdered in the presence of James II and two younger brothers.
James himself in a fit of rage stabbed William, the 8th Earl of Douglas, one of the most powerful nobles in the land when the Earl would not denounce the 4th Earl of Crawford (the Tiger Earl) and the Earl of Ross (4th Lord of the Isles).
www.nwlink.com /~scotlass/jamesii.htm   (637 words)

  
 James II and the Jacobite War
In 1685 when James II set out to obtain religious toleration for Catholics in Ireland, he had no idea that in less than four years he would be leading an army of Catholics against William of Orange.
James' decision to flee to France on 23 December 1688 and Williams' bloodless ascension to the throne completed what historians call, "The Glorious Revolution." William's concern about Ireland after gaining control of the throne remained minimal until James landed at Kinsale, Co. Cork in March of 1689 with French troops and munitions.
James' hopes of defeating William in England were crushed, however, Tyrconnell "showed remarkable energy in rebuiding the army and organising the army to resist invasion" (493).
www.usna.edu /EnglishDept/ilv/james.htm   (1958 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Royal History - The Stuarts - James II and VII
King James II of England (who was also James VII of Scotland) inherited the throne in 1685 upon the death of his brother, Charles II.
James II was unpopular because of his attempts to increase the power of the monarchy and restore the Catholic faith.
James II: The Triumph and the Tragedy by John Callow.
www.royalty.nu /Europe/England/Stuart/JamesII.html   (283 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Stuarts > James II
Born in 1633 and named after his grandfather James I, James II grew up in exile after the Civil War (he served in the armies of Louis XIV) and, after his brother's restoration, commanded the Royal Navy from 1660 to 1673.
Despite his conversion, James II succeeded to the throne peacefully at the age of 51.
James attempted to promote the Roman Catholic cause by dismissing judges and Lord Lieutenants who refused to support the withdrawal of laws penalising religious dissidents, appointing Catholics to important academic posts, and to senior military and political positions.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page97.asp   (505 words)

  
 James II and VII
Because of James' conversion to the Catholic faith, three attempts were made in Parliament to exclude him from the succession to the throne; none of these was successful.
James died September 16, 1701, at the Château of St. Germain-en-Laye, when he was succeeded in all his British rights by his son James.
James' body remained in the Church of the English Benedictines, waiting translation to Westminster Abbey, until the French Revolution when it were desecrated by the mob and lost.
www.jacobite.ca /kings/james2.htm   (1109 words)

  
 BBC - History - James II, King of England, Scotland and Ireland (1633 - 1701)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James was born in 1633, third son to Charles I and Henrietta Maria.
James did not share this disposition and he maintained a stubborn adherence to the Roman Catholic faith.
When, in 1688, Mary of Modena gave birth to a male heir, James Francis Edward (the Old Pretender), Parliament was provoked; this event scuppered their plans for James' Protestant daughter Mary to take the throne.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/historic_figures/james_ii_king.shtml   (452 words)

  
 The Glorious Revolution of 1688   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In 1685, James II became King after the death of his older brother, Charles II.
James was stubborn, and only put his trust in a few close conniving advisors and flatterers.
James' attempts to increase the power of Catholics, through the Declarations of Indulgence in 1687 and 1688, only served to antagonize Parliament and the Anglican establishment.
www.lawsch.uga.edu /~glorious/james_II.html   (222 words)

  
 James II (1633-1701)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James II was the second surviving son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria.
At the restoration of his brother Charles II to the English throne in 1660, James became lord high admiral and did much to maintain the efficiency and improve the organization of the navy.
For most of his life James was the spokesman of the conservative Anglican courtiers, who believed that his views on monarchy and Parliament coincided with theirs, who found his formal and humourless nature more congenial than Charles's slippery geniality, and who respected his frank acknowledgment of his religious beliefs.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/britannicapages/KingJames-II/KingJames-II.html   (1623 words)

  
 James II, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland
James II, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland: Reign - Reign When Charles died in 1685, James succeeded peacefully to the throne.
James II, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland: Attempts at Restoration - Attempts at Restoration James made an effort to restore himself by landing in Ireland in 1689 and...
James II, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland: Early Life - Early Life As the young duke of York James was surrendered (1646) to the parliamentary forces at...
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0825918.html   (266 words)

  
 James II   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James II James II David Cody, Associate Professor of English, Hartwick College
James II was born in 1633 and died in 1701: the second son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria, he succeeded his brother, Charles II, to the throne and reigned as king of Great Britain from 1685 until 1688, when he was overthrown in the Glorious Revolution.
James proceeded, ill-advisedly, to enlarge the standing army and to place Catholics within it in positions of command: after doing so, he stationed it where it threatened Protestant London.
www.victorianweb.org /history/JamesII.html   (286 words)

  
 James II of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He was replaced not by his Roman Catholic son, James Francis Edward, but by his Protestant daughter and son-in-law, Mary II and William III, who became joint Sovereigns.
His son James Francis Edward Stuart and his grandson Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) attempted to restore the Jacobite line after James's death, but failed.
Judge Jeffreys' Bloody Assizes led the public to see their King as a cruel and barbarous ruler.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_II_of_England   (2593 words)

  
 Harvard Gazette: Graduate student Scott Sowerby finds surprising side to King James II
This was the "Bloodless" or "Glorious Revolution," when James, abandoned by many of his supporters and facing an invading army from the Netherlands led by his son-in-law William of Orange, fled to France and exile.
Surely, James must have been a dismal failure as a king to have inspired his erstwhile subjects to call his expulsion "glorious," and for many years, historians assumed this to have been the case.
Sowerby believes that James, rather than being an autocrat who tried to force an unwelcome religion on his subjects, was in fact an advocate of religious toleration whose vision of a nation in which each person was free to worship as he or she saw fit was too threatening to the Protestant establishment.
www.news.harvard.edu /gazette/2003/04.17/15-kingjames.html   (1066 words)

  
 Restoration in Britain, Charles II, James II , William III and Anne
James II reign proved disastrous, he antagonized the government by suspending the anti Catholic laws, then arresting 6 bishops, finally James second wife produced a male heir, (James the old pretender).
James fled to Ireland, where he was eventually defeated in battle by William.
Anne, Younger, Protestant daughter of James II succeeded to the throne in 1702.
www.great-britain.co.uk /history/restore.htm   (293 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
Charles II, second son of Charles I and Henrietta Marie of France, was born in 1630.
His oldest child, James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, made a failed bid to capture the crown at the time of his father's death and was executed by James II, brother of Charles II and Uncle to Monmouth.
Titus Oates, a defrocked Anglican priest, stoked the fires of anti-Catholicism by accusing the queen and her favorites of attempting to murder Charles; ten men fell prey to false witness and Oates' manipulation of the anti-Catholic movement, and were executed.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon49.html   (826 words)

  
 The Open Door Web Site : History : James II and the Monmouth Rebellion (1685)
James II and Parliament were alarmed by Monmouth's progress and declared him a traitor and an outlaw.
James was active during the second (1665-1667) and third (1672-1674) Dutch Wars and proved himself to be a good leader and fine strategist.
James had been officially received into the Catholic Church in 1669, and Parliament tried all it could to stop his coming to the throne.
www.saburchill.com /history/chapters/chap4012.html   (618 words)

  
 James II   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James II was born in 1633 to King Charles I and Henrietta Maria, the sister of the king of France.
James had been married to a Protestant woman named Anne Hyde, who gave birth to two daughters, Mary and Anne.
Mary, James' daughter and William's wife was first in line for the throne, so leaders from the Whig and Tory parties secretly invited William to take over the throne.
members.aol.com /theroyaltysite/english/ejames2.html   (514 words)

  
 James II of England : James VII of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James II of England : James VII of Scotland
James II of England (James VII of Scotland) Stuart, (October 14, 1633 - September 16, 1701), was a King of England, Scotland and Ireland.
It uses material from the wikipedia article James II of England : James VII of Scotland.
www.eurofreehost.com /ja/James_VII_of_Scotland.html   (253 words)

  
 Articles - James Boag II   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James Boag II (1854-1919) was the son of James Boag I, and co-proprietor of J.
James Boag II became manager of J. Boag and Son in 1887, and later became the sole proprieter after the death of his father in 1890.
In 1919 James II died and was succeeded by James III.
www.gaple.com /articles/James_Boag_II?mySession=73429eaf1cd2ac44f9f3ba239779cee4   (330 words)

  
 webGED: The Bement Family Data Page
James, however, had antagonized the Scottish nobles by confiscating their estates, and he was assassinated in 1437 by a group of nobles.
James II (of England and Ireland) (1633-1701), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1685-1688).
James II (of Scotland) (1430-60), king of Scotland (1437-60), son of King James I, born in Edinburgh.
www.bementfamily.com /webged/bement.wbg/wga35.html   (3481 words)

  
 James II of England - Metaweb   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
James himself was rescued from confinement at St. James's Palace in London in April 1648 and was taken, in disguise, to The Hague.
As the young duke of York James was surrendered (1646) to the parliamentary forces at the end of the first civil war, but he escaped (1648) to the Continent and served in the French (1652-55) and Spanish (1658) armies.
Another bio of James II and presentation of his Jacobite heritage until the 21st Century
www.metaweb.com /wiki/wiki.phtml?title=James_II   (1637 words)

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