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Topic: James McHenry


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
 Fort McHenry - Biocrawler
Named after James McHenry, a Scotch-Irish immigrant and surgeon-soldier who became Secretary of War under President Washington, Fort McHenry was built to defend the important port of Baltimore from future enemy attacks, after America won its independence.
Due to the poor accuracy of the British weapons and the limited range of the American guns, little damage was done on either side, but the British ceased their attack on the morning of September 14, 1814, and the naval part of the British invasion of Baltimore had been repulsed.
In an earlier coincidence, James McHenry's son had served in the defense of the fort during the Battle of Baltimore.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Fort_McHenry   (914 words)

  
  From Revolution to Reconstruction: Biographies: James McHenry
McHenry was born at Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland, in 1753.
McHenry stayed on Washington's staff until 1780, when he joined that of the Marquis de Lafayette, and he remained in that assignment until he entered the Maryland Senate (1781-86).
McHenry missed many of the proceedings at the Philadelphia convention, in part because of the illness of his brother, and played an insubstantial part in the debates when he was present.
odur.let.rug.nl /~usa/B/mchenry/mchenry.htm   (428 words)

  
 James McHenry Writings and Biography
McHenry was born at Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland, in 1753.
McHenry stayed on Washington's staff until 1780, when he joined that of the Marquis de Lafayette, and he remained in that assignment until he entered the Maryland Senate (1781-86).
McHenry missed many of the proceedings at the Philadelphia convention, in part because of the illness of his brother, and played an insubstantial part in the debates when he was present.
www.lexrex.com /bios/jmchenry.htm   (416 words)

  
 American President: James McHenry (1797-1800)
James McHenry was born in County Antrim, Ireland, on November 16, 1753, and briefly attended the University of Dublin before receiving a medical education in America at the Newark Academy (Delaware).
McHenry left the Army in 1781 with the rank of major and proceeded to trade his military career for a legislative one, serving as a state senator in Maryland from 1781 to 1783.
McHenry went on to serve at the national level as a member of the Continental Congress (1783-1786) and, in 1787, he became a delegate to the federal Constitutional Convention.
www.millercenter.virginia.edu /academic/americanpresident/adams/essays/cabinet/115   (230 words)

  
 UC Irvine - Faculty Profile System
McHenry, M.J. and Strother, J.A. The kinematics of phototaxis in larvae of the ascidian Aplidium constellatum.
McHenry, M.J. and Jed, J. (2003).  The scaling of hydrodynamics and swimming performance in jellyfish (Aurelia aurita).  J.
McHenry, M.J. (2001).  Mechanisms of helical swimming: asymmetries in the morphology, movement and mechanics of larvae of the ascidian Distaplia occidentalis.
www.faculty.uci.edu /profile.cfm?faculty_id=5273   (368 words)

  
 JAMES McHENRY
McHenry remained on Washington's staff as a volunteer without rank or pay for two and a half years.
McHenry, who would preside over the Army under both Washington and John Adams, was the third of seven Continental soldiers to hold that position.
McHenry's dedication to strong central government led him to advocate civilian leadership, a democratic ideal held by many of the citizen-soldiers of the Revolution, including most notably George Washington.
www.army.mil /cmh-pg/books/RevWar/ss/mchenry.htm   (1817 words)

  
 The American Revolution - The Making of America and Her Independence
McHenry came to accept the proposition that the breach between colonies and mother country could not be healed, and he offered his services to his adopted land when hostilities broke out in New England in 1775.
But in McHenry's case the concept was put to the practical test as newly appointed generals, including his friend Hamilton and the controversial James Wilkinson, vied to control military appointments and organizational plans for the provisional Army.
McHenry continued in office for some months after the threat of war with France ended in 1800, but disputes with Adams over the future of the Federalist Party finally made his presence in the cabinet untenable.
www.americanrevolution.com /ppl_james_mchenry.html   (2262 words)

  
 James McHenry Biography and Summary
James McHenry's name is unfamiliar to most readers today, though he enjoyed considerable popularity as a poet, playwright, novelist, and critic during his life.
McHenry's contributions to literature should not be forgotten, however, as he was the first A...
McHenry was a signer of the United States Constitution from Maryland and the namesake of Fort McHenry, the bombardment of which inspired the American national anthem S...
www.bookrags.com /James_McHenry   (134 words)

  
 James McHenry, First West Virginia Infantry, Civil War
James McHenry, born 6 Sep 1839, in Marshall County, W.Va., was the son of John and Mary (Dye) McHenry.
There is no further mention of James McHenry in the Trimble diary but he apparently recovered sufficiently to enlist in the subsequent First Infantry organization for two years, from 23 Feb 1862 to 23 Feb 1864.
James McHenry, 28, married Hannah Jenkins, 22, d/o Aaron Jenkins, on 16 Apr 1868 in Marshall County, W.Va. The date he gives in the pension file is about a year later but this is the marriage record.
www.lindapages.com /wvcw/1wvi/1wvi-jmchenry.htm   (1072 words)

  
 James McHenry - Encyclopedia.com
McHenry was (1781-86) a member of the Maryland senate, served (1783-86) as a delegate to the Confederation Congress, and attended (1787) the U.S. Constitutional Convention, where he maintained a conservative course.
Gypalo of Algonquin and James McTague of Cary, Republican...
Kenneth (Barbara) Mach of Inverness and James Mach of McHenry; grandchildren, Jennifer Mach of Lakemoor...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-McHenryJ.html   (951 words)

  
 Delegates to the Constitutional Convention - National Constitution Center
McHenry was born in Ireland and received a classical education in Dublin.
McHenry missed much of the Philadelphia convention because of his brother’s illness and contributed little to the debate when he was there.
McHenry’s preference for Hamilton’s political guidance rather than Adams’s annoyed the president, and in 1800 Adams forced the Marylander to resign.
www.constitutioncenter.org /explore/FoundingFathers/Maryland.shtml   (1110 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay.
Named after James McHenry, a Scots-Irish immigrant and surgeon-soldier who became Secretary of War under President Washington, Fort McHenry was built to defend the important Port of Baltimore from future enemy attacks, after America won its independence.
Fort McHenry served as the primary defense for the port of Baltimore until about 1848, when Fort Carroll was constructed further down the Patapsco River.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Fort_McHenry   (1046 words)

  
 James McHenry
James McHenry (November 16, 1753– May 3, 1816) was an early American statesman.
McHenry was signer of the United States Constitution from Maryland and the namesake of Fort McHenry, the bombardment of which inspired the American national anthem " Star-Spangled Banner." He was also a delegate to the Continental Congress from Maryland, and the third United States Secretary of War, under Presidents George Washington and John Adams.
Born in Ireland, he was a physician and ran a Baltimore import-export business with his brother.
www.abacci.com /wikipedia/topic.aspx?cur_title=James_McHenry   (172 words)

  
 James McHenry Information
McHenry was a signer of the United States Constitution from Maryland and the namesake of Fort McHenry, the bombardment of which inspired the American national anthem Star-Spangled Banner.
McHenry was born into a Scotch-Irish family at Ballymena, Ulster, (the then northern province of Ireland), in 1753.
Like many of the Founding Fathers, James McHenry was known to be a Christian.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/James_McHenry   (670 words)

  
 James McHenry, Philadelphia Convention Delegate   (Site not responding. Last check: )
McHenry was born in Ireland and came to colonial Philadelphia in 1771; he studied medicine with Benjamin Rush, perhaps the best-known physician in early America.
He then entered a mercantile partnership with his father and brother in Baltimore, but when the Revolutionary War broke out, went into the Continental Army as a surgeon, later becoming one of Washngton's aides, and then an aide-de-camp of the marquis de Lafayette.
I do no Man Injury, nor shall I give Offence, I believe, in saying his Knowledge of this Subject is the most comprehensive, his Ideas the most distinct, and his Explanations the shortest, clearest, and most satisfactory of any Gentleman's I have met with.
fas-history.rutgers.edu /~clemens/constitutional1/mcHenry.html   (246 words)

  
 James Adams - Search Results - MSN Encarta
James Truslow Adams was born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated at Brooklyn...
Two members of Adams's Cabinet whom he had come to distrust were Secretary of State Timothy Pickering and Secretary of War James McHenry, who were...
McHenry, James: member of John Adams’s cabinet (table)
encarta.msn.com /James_Adams.html   (114 words)

  
 James McHenry Papers
McHenry sat in the Maryland Senate, 1781-1786, was a member of the Continental Congress, 1783-1786, and was a delagate to the federal Constitutional Convention in 1787.
Although a formal investigation was averted, McHenry found it necessary to defend himself before the House of Representatives in 1802.
There are drafts of McHenry's correspondence with Washington during the quasi-war with France, including plans to expand the United States Army.
www.clements.umich.edu /Webguides/Arlenes/M/McHenry.html   (283 words)

  
 [No title]
At eighteen, McHenry was the first of his family to immigrate to America.
McHenry's lifelong friendship with Lafayette dated from this experience.
McHenry resigned his commission at the end of 1781 to enter politics.
www.nps.gov /morr/historyculture/upload/McHenry.doc   (267 words)

  
 Dr. James McHenry, Dental Arts, Plymouth, Michigan, Meet Our Doctors
James McHenry, D.D.S. Dr. Samuel Fandino, D.D.S. Dr. James McHenry, D.D.S. Dr. James McHenry, D.D.S., an extensively experienced and highly skilled dentist, is regarded by many as a leader in the field of cosmetic dentistry.
McHenry's formal education and training are second to none.
Dr. McHenry is active in a number of professional dental organizations, including the American Dental Association, the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, and the Michigan Dental Association.
www.premiersmiles.com /html/mchenry.html   (592 words)

  
 James McHenry
McHenry was born at Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland, in 1753 and received a classical education in Dublin.
Though his family was fairly prosperous in Ulster, James became the first to immigrate in 1771 at age 18.
McHenry came to accept the belief that independence from Great Britain was the only option so he offered his services to the Continental Army when hostilities broke out in New England in 1775.
www.faithofourfathers.org /biographies/mchenry.html   (821 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Because we will be talking about three men, all with the name "James McHenry," we'll use the name "Jim" for "Ivory Knuckles," the name most knew him by, although his high-school friends called him "Mac." For his father, James Ray McHenry, we'll use the name "Ray," the name he always used with his friends.
James McHenry, at the age of 44, was one of seven McHenry men imprisoned in Fort Mifflin and held for over three months during what some call the "Fishing Creek Confederacy."
James Ray McHenry was born November 27, 1878, in Cambra, one of seven children of James McHenry and Bethia Tubbs McHenry.
www.bentonnews.net /JimMcHenry.htm   (2097 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - James McHenry (U.S. History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
He emigrated to Philadelphia in 1771 and, after studying medicine under Benjamin Rush, served as a surgeon in the Continental Army in the American Revolution.
McHenry was (1781–86) a member of the Maryland senate, served (1783–86) as a delegate to the Confederation Congress, and attended (1787) the U.S. Constitutional Convention, where he maintained a conservative course.
Fort McHenry at Baltimore was named for him.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/McHenryJ.html   (237 words)

  
 McHenry, James
McHenry, James (1753-1816) Signer of the Constitution, Secretary of War: James McHenry was born in Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland, on November 16, 1753.
At the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, McHenry signed the Constitution, later attending the Maryland ratifying convention.
Fort McHenry in Baltimore was named after him.
www.historycentral.com /Bio/nn/McHenry.html   (168 words)

  
 Texas Execution Information - Report: James Richardson   (Site not responding. Last check: )
James Davis Richardson, 32, was executed by lethal injection on 23 May 2000 in Huntsville, Texas, for the murder of a clerk during a liquor store robbery.
As McHenry was walking out, Richardson drew a.25 caliber pistol and shot Gerald Abay, 35, in the throat and chest.
James McHenry received a life sentence for capital murder.
www.txexecutions.org /reports/215.asp   (515 words)

  
 1593. Benjamin Franklin (1706-90). Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations. 1989
—at the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, when queried as he left Independence Hall on the final day of deliberation—in the notes of Dr. James McHenry, one of Maryland’s delegates to the Convention.
McHenry’s notes were first published in The American Historical Review, vol.
A republic replied the Doctor if you can keep it.” When McHenry’s notes were included in The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, ed.
www.bartleby.com /73/1593.html   (175 words)

  
 Delegates to the Constitutional Convention: James McHenry
Fort McHenry, located near Baltimore, MD, is named in his honor.
The "Star-Spangled Banner" was written off the shores of Fort McHenry on September 13-14, 1814.
Biography from the National Archives: McHenry was born at Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland, in 1753.
teachingamericanhistory.org /convention/delegates/mchenry.html   (596 words)

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