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Topic: James Ussher


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In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  Ussher-Lightfoot Calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ussher's work, more properly known as the Annales veteris testamenti, a prima mundi origine deducti (Annals of the Old Testament, deduced from the first origins of the world), was his contribution to the long-running theological debate on the age of the Earth.
Ussher's proposed date of 4004 BC was not greatly different from the estimates of the Venerable Bede (3952 BC) or Ussher's near-contemporary, Scaliger (3949 BC).
Ussher and other biblical scholars were able to achieve a fairly close correspondence between their chronologies, as they used much the same methodology to calculate key events recorded in the Bible.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ussher-Lightfoot_Calendar   (2185 words)

  
 James Ussher - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James Ussher (also spelled Usher) (January 4, 1581–March 21, 1656) was Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625–1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which dated the Creation from 4004 BC.
Ussher engaged in extensive debate with Catholic theologians, and pressed for firm measures to be taken against Irish Catholics.
Although Ussher produced a considerable number of religious works, his most famous was the Annales veteris testamenti, a prima mundi origine deducti ("Annals of the Old Testament, deduced from the first origins of the world"), published in 1650.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_Ussher   (723 words)

  
 Errors in quoting Bishop Ussher
Ussher was able to use the ages of famous pre-flood personages in the Bible to estimate the number of years between creation and the flood.
Bishop James Ussher determined the age of the universe thus: he defined the age of the universe as the time since creation (by God) and measured the age by adding the periods specified in the Bible, suitably corrected using available astronomical and historical records.
Ussher was made an archbishop of the Church of Ireland in 1625, nine years before the imposition of Anglican articles of faith, a development he was unhappy with.
freemasonry.bcy.ca /texts/ussher/errors.html   (572 words)

  
 Life of Ussher - Ussher Project - Modern History - Trinity College Dublin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Ussher was born in Dublin on the 4 th January, 1581, the son of Arland Ussher and Margaret Stanyhurst.
Ussher's call for stringent enforcement of the recusancy laws owed much to his upbringing and his strict Calvinist understanding of the Antichrist, but it made uneasy hearing in the political reality of 1622 when James I was attempting to secure a Spanish infanta for the Prince of Wales.
Ussher fought a rearguard action but his ultimate failure was evident in his decision in the mid 1630s to retreat to the safety of his library at Drogheda and leave the running of the church to Bramhall.
www.tcd.ie /Modern_History/Ussher/life.php   (1609 words)

  
 §8. James Ussher. VI. Caroline Divines. Vol. 7. Cavalier and Puritan. The Cambridge History of English and ...
Parallel to Hammond’s influence is that of another eminent theologian who was never a party man. James Ussher stands somewhat apart in principles from the dominant school of his time.
The prominent place which Ussher’s name occupies in contemporary accounts of the literature of the seventeenth century is a proof, if one were needed, how much more influential, at the period of crisis which led to the civil war, were personal than literary influences.
The “gentle soul” of Ussher made men love him and attach more importance to his writings than they deserved: such may well be the view of posterity, and it would not be wholly unfair.
www.bartleby.com /217/0608.html   (403 words)

  
 James Ussher   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
James Ussher (also spelled Usher) (January 4, 1581 - March 21, 1656) was Archbishop of Armagh and Primate ofAll Ireland between 1625 - 1656 and a prolificreligious scholar who most famously published a chronology which dated creation from 4004 BC.
Ussher was born in Dublin, Ireland intoa well-to-do Anglo-Irish family.
Although Ussher produced a considerable number of religious works, his most famous was the Annales veteris testamenti, aprima mundi origine deducti ("Annals of the Old Testament, deduced from the first origins of the world"), published in 1650.
www.therfcc.org /james-ussher-56889.html   (561 words)

  
 James Ussher   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
James Ussher, born and raised in Dublin, Ireland became an important figure in the Christian Church early in his life.
After counting the “begats” of the Book of Genesis, Ussher came to the conclusion that the universe was created at 9:00 am on the twenty-third of October, 4004 BC.
In 1656, James Ussher died at the age of seventy-five, while still living in England.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/information/biography/uvwxyz/ussher_james.html   (359 words)

  
 Bibliography - Home page - Ussher Project - Modern History - Trinity College Dublin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Ussher et al., A copie of the proceedings of some worthy and learned divines, appointed by the Lords to meet at the Bishop of Lincolnes in Westminster Touching innovations in the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England.
Crawford Gribben, 'James Ussher and the Collapse of the Genevan worldview' in Crawford Gribben, The Puritan Millenium.
Norman Sykes, 'James Ussher as Churchman' in Hermathena 88 (1956) 59-80.
www.tcd.ie /Modern_History/Ussher/bibliography.php   (3346 words)

  
 Creation Science, Ussher   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Ussher took a known point in Biblical history, namely, the fall of Jerusalem in 588 B.C. Counting back from there, with the Bible’s genealogies and the known number of years that these people lived, he simply added up the dates to get back to the 4,004 B.C. date for Adam’s birthday.
Ussher claims that 23 October 4004 BC is the date of the creation of the world.
While Ussher does add the six 24-hour days for the creation to his calculations, we have ample evidence today to show that the days of creation were long periods of time.
www.answersincreation.org /ussher.htm   (680 words)

  
 Bishop Ussher Dates the World: 4004 BC
Bishop Ussher Dates the World: 4004 BC James Ussher (1581-1656), Archbishop of Armagh, Primate of All Ireland, and Vice-Chancellor of Trinity College in Dublin was highly regarded in his day as a churchman and as a scholar.
Based on an intricate correlation of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean histories and Holy writ, it was incorporated into an authorized version of the Bible printed in 1701, and thus came to be regarded with almost as much unquestioning reverence as the Bible itself.
John Lightfoot (1602-1675), Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University was a contemporary of Ussher.
www.lhup.edu /~dsimanek/ussher.htm   (348 words)

  
 James Ussher   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Through Ussher's tolerance of puritans in Ireland, by Cromwell’s order he was given a state funeral in Westminster Abbey (1656).
He is considered the Irish link in the 17th century “republic of letters.” His library was bought by the state in 1656 and placed in TCD (1661) where it remains.
(2 vol., 1650–54), Ussher worked out a system of dates (setting the creation at 4004 B.C.) that was followed for many years to come until disproved in the 19th century.
www.ucc.ie /acad/classics/CNLS/ussher.html   (347 words)

  
 James Ussher
James Ussher was sent to a school in Dublin opened by two political agents of James VI of Scotland, who adopted this manner of averting the suspicions of Queen Elizabeth I's government from their real object, which was to secure a party for James in Ireland in the event of the queen's death.
For many years Ussher was actively employed both in the government of his diocese and in the publication of several learned works, among which may be specified Emmanuel (a treatise upon the Incarnation), published in 1638, and Britannicarum Ecclesiarum Antiquitates, in 1639.
All Ussher's property in Ireland was lost to him through the rebellion, except his books and some plate and furniture, but he was assigned the temporalities of the vacant see of Carlisle for his support.
www.nndb.com /people/742/000094460   (918 words)

  
 The Annals of the World by James Ussher
After a lifetime of research, James Ussher set out to write a history of the world from creation to A.D. The result was published in the 1650s as the literary classic The Annals of the World.
Using the Bible as his main source, Ussher began with the death Nebuchadnezzar as a reliable date and worked backward through the genealogies of the Old Testament to arrive at the date of creation -- 4004 B.C. Integrating biblical history (around 15% of the text is from the Bible) with secular.
Popularly discarded when evolutionary-based theories became "vogue" in the last half-century, Archbishop James Ussher was a well-respected and important historical scholar of ancient history during the early 17th century.
www2.whidbey.net /jmboyes/annals.htm   (645 words)

  
 October 23: Ussher's Date for the Creation
James Ussher, who tried to calculate the beginning of the earth.
James Ussher was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1581 and died in England in 1656.
Although Ussher went by the best knowledge of his day, pouring deep learning into the subject, even then there were strong reasons to doubt his conclusions.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2003/10/daily-10-23-2003.shtml   (818 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: James Ussher
James Ussher (also spelled Usher) (January 4, 1581 - March 21, 1656) was Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625 - 1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which dated creation from 4004 BC.
Ussher bibliography and list of secondary sources: James Ussher, Archbishop of Armagh by R. Buck Knox, University of Wales Press, 1967
James Ussher (also spelled Usher) (1581 - 1656), born on January 4, 1581, in Dublin, Ireland into a well-to-do Anglo-Irish family, was a priest who sided with King Charles during the English Civil War.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/James-Ussher   (2216 words)

  
 Archbishop James Ussher
James Ussher (January 4, 1581- March 21, 1656), Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of Ireland, was highly regarded in his day as a theologian and as a scholar.
During his lifetime he was widely known as a defender of learning, of the value of books secular and sacred, and a proponent of maintaining an independent identity for Irish Protestant faith.
Archbishop Ussher's chronology is widely misquoted, often with the addition of an hour.
freemasonry.bcy.ca /texts/ussher/ussher.html   (333 words)

  
 James Ussher - TheBestLinks.com - Bishop, Catholic, Dublin, England, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
James Ussher - TheBestLinks.com - Bishop, Catholic, Dublin, England,...
James Ussher, Bishop, Catholic, Dublin, England, English Civil War, January 4...
nl:James Ussherde:James Ussher James Ussher (also spelled Usher) (January 4, 1581 - March 21, 1656) was Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625-1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which dated creation from 4004 BC.
www.thebestlinks.com /James_Ussher.html   (646 words)

  
 Bartholomew's notes on religion
The fact that Ussher’s chronology has been deleted from Bibles is evidence of the Church’s backsliding into the deceptive ideas of evolution.
Ussher was neither charlatan nor naive; in fact, he was one of the most learned men of his day.
The Protestants were alarmed and at the installation of the new Deputy (Sept. 1622) James Ussher, then Protestant Bishop of Meath, taking as his text, "He beareth not the sword in vain," preached a violent sermon in favour of religious persecution.
blogs.salon.com /0003494/2005/04/19.html   (554 words)

  
 Bishop James Ussher Sets the Date for Creation: October 23, 4004 B.C.
As a Protestant bishop in a Catholic land, Ussher’s obsession with providing an accurate Biblical history stemmed from a desire to establish the superiority of the scholarship practiced by the clergy of his reformed faith over that of the Jesuits, the resolutely intellectual Roman Catholic order.
Ussher began his calculation by adding the ages of the twenty-one generations of people of the Hebrew-derived Old Testament, beginning with Adam and Eve.
Ussher reasoned, therefore, that it must have been harvest time, which corresponded with the autumnal equinox: “I have observed that the Sunday, which in the year [4004 B.C.] aforesaid, came nearest the Autumnal Aequinox, by Astronomical Tables, happened upon the 23 day of the Julian October.”
www.law.umkc.edu /faculty/projects/ftrials/scopes/ussher.html   (2271 words)

  
 §6. James Ussher. IX. Anglo-Irish Literature. Vol. 14. The Victorian Age, Part Two. The Cambridge History of ...
But the first seventeenth century writer whose works are familiar to contemporary Englishmen was James Ussher, one of the first students of Trinity college, Dublin, afterwards archbishop of Armagh and primate of Ireland, who, without doubt, was one of the most remarkable of Irish scholars, being, according to Selden, ad miraculam doctus.
But his opus magnum is Annales Veteris et Novi Testamenti, a chronological compendium in Latin of the history of the world from the Creation to the dispersion of the Jews under Vespasian, which brought him European fame.
Ussher’s specially Irish works are mentioned in the bibliography.
www.bartleby.com /224/0906.html   (282 words)

  
 The History of Watson and Neill Solicitors
The firm was founded by James Ussher, from Dublin, in premises at William Street, Lurgan.
Mr Charles William (CW) Neill became an articled apprentice to Mr James Ussher and was admitted as a solicitor in 1896.
During the War years, Mr James Neill gave assistance in the firms of Charles A McKenzie and Co., Belfast and W J Irwin and Son, Dungannon, to provide cover for solicitors who were overseas with the armed forces.
www.watsonandneill.com /history.htm   (330 words)

  
 Archbishop’s achievement
James Ussher (1581–1656) was Archbishop of Armagh, the highest position in the Irish Anglican Church, a product of the Reformation in England.  He was also a noted historian and Hebrew scholar, highly regarded throughout Britain, both by kings and revolutionaries.  In 1650 and 1654 he published his magnum opus, The Annals of the World,
Ussher’s creation date has become a figure of fun.  However, it is a well-kept secret that some great scientists also calculated creation dates very close to Ussher’s.
Ussher was recognized as one of the greatest scholars of his time, being an expert on Semitic languages and ancient history.  And Lightfoot was an expert in Hebrew, including the Old Testament, and later Jewish writings called the Talmud and the Midrash, as well as being skilled in Latin and Greek.
www.answersingenesis.org /creation/v26/i1/archbishop.asp   (1550 words)

  
 1BookStreet :: Annals of the World: James Ussher's Classic Survey of World History
Ussher did something very similar to what Joseph did in his "The Antiquities of The Jews," which is Josephus' history starting with creation and ending about the same year when Titus destroyed Jerusalem.
He died before A.D. Bishop Ussher, if he had the benefit of archaeological evidence discovered after his death in 1656, especially the work of Yigael Yadin, he might have extended his Annals to cover the war under Bar Kochba.
Ussher places 2349 BCE as the year of the global Flood of Noah where God wipes out every living child, plant and animal on the planet (expect those on the boat).
www.1bookstreet.com /0890513600/Annals_of_the_World_James_Ussher_s_Classic_Survey_of_World_History.html   (1633 words)

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