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Topic: James Weldon Johnson


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  James Weldon Johnson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 - June 26, 1938) was a leading African American author, poet, early civil rights activist, and prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance.
Johnson was a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. He was also one of the first African-American professors at New York University.
James Weldon Johnson died in 1938 while on vacation in Wiscasset, Maine when the car he was driving was hit by a train.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_Weldon_Johnson   (324 words)

  
 Governor's Office - Black History Month - Biography of James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
As the first son of James Johnson and the former Helen Louise Dillet, James Weldon inherited his forebears' combination of industrious energy and public-mindedness, as demonstrated by his maternal grandfathers long life in public service in the Bahamas, where he served in the House of Assembly for thirty years.
James, Sr., spent many years as the headwaiter of the St. James Hotel in Jacksonville, Florida, where he had moved the family after his sponge fishing and dray businesses were ruined by a hurricane that hit the Bahamas in 1866.
James, Jr., was born and educated in Jacksonville, first by his mother, who taught for many years in the public schools, and later by James C. Walter, the well-educated but stern principal of the Stanton School.
www.myflorida.com /myflorida/governorsoffice/black_history/james_johnson.html   (1056 words)

  
 James Johnson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
James Johnson (Georgia) (1811-1891), U.S. congressman and governor of Georgia
James Johnson (figure skater), British silver medalist in pairs figure skating at the 1908 Summer Olympics
James A. Johnson, chairman of Fannie Mae, the Kennedy Center and the Brookings Institution
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/James_Johnson   (261 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
James Weldon Johnson was born in Florida in 1871 and educated in a Jacksonville, Florida, segregated public school.
Johnson examines tactics that have failed in the past, emigration back to Africa and the use of physical force against the white majority, only to reject them.
Johnson was killed in an automobile accident in the state of Maine on 26 June 1938.
www.literaryencyclopedia.com /php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=2380   (1047 words)

  
 Global Mappings: James Weldon Johnson
Johnson was highly educated, earning an BA and an MA from Atlanta University, passing the Florida Bar exam in 1897 and eventually studying literature at Columbia University.
Johnson was also a key historian of the Harlem Renaissance, documenting much of the culture and activism as it happened.
Johnson was one of the key players in making the NAACP a truly national organization, with branches and supporters around the country.
diaspora.northwestern.edu /mbin/WebObjects/DiasporaX.woa/wa/displayArticle?atomid=606   (449 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson's Life and Career
Johnson, James Weldon (17 June 1871-26 June 1938), civil-rights leader, poet, and novelist, was born in Jacksonville, Florida, the son of James Johnson, a resort hotel headwaiter, and Helen Dillet, a schoolteacher.
Johnson was deeply committed to exposing the injustice and brutality imposed on African Americans throughout the United States, especially in the Jim Crow South.
Finally, Johnson was a key figure in making the NAACP a clearinghouse for civil-rights court cases; he collaborated closely with such noted attorneys as Moorfield Storey, Louis Marshall, and Arthur Garfield Hayes in a series of cases defending African-American civil rights and attacking the legal structure of segregation.
www.english.uiuc.edu /maps/poets/g_l/johnson/life.htm   (2624 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - James Weldon Johnson
James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), American author, lawyer, and diplomat, whose writings and activities demonstrated his deep consideration of fl life in the United States.
Later Johnson served as U.S. consul, in Venezuela from 1906 to 1909 and in Nicaragua from 1909 to 1912.
Johnson also wrote volumes of poetry, including God's Trombones (1927), a collection of sermons in free verse; several studies of fl American life, including Black Manhattan (1930); and an autobiography, Along This Way (1933).
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761552465/Johnson_James_Weldon.html   (335 words)

  
 Johnson, James Weldon on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Johnson was the first African American to be admitted to the Florida bar and later was American consul (1906-12), first in Venezuela and then in Nicaragua.
Irony and subversion in James Weldon Johnson's 'The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man'.
James Weldon Johnson's Black Manhattan and the Kingdom of American Culture.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/J/JohnsonJW.asp   (424 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
James Weldon Johnson was born on June 17, 1871 in Jacksonville, Fla. He is best known as being a poet, composer, diplomat, and anthologist of fl culture.
James was trained in music and other subjects by his mother, a schoolteacher.
Johnson graduated from Atlanta University with A.B. in 1894.
members.aol.com /klove01/jamesjoh.htm   (359 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Johnson was born in Jacksonville, Florida, June 17, 1871.
James was a charter member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) in 1914, along with such luminaries as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern and Victor Herbert.
The James Weldon Johnson stamp was the 1 Ith in the Black Heritage series, which has appeared at the rate of one stamp a year since 1978.
members.aol.com /efirpo/johnsnjw.html   (443 words)

  
 Harlem 1900-1940: Schomburg Exhibit James Weldon Johnson
James Weldon Johnson was a writer, poet and distinguished statesman, born in Jacksonville, Florida, where he and his brother, J. Rosamond Johnson, grew up.
Their father was head waiter at a resort hotel there and their mother, who had been born in the Bahamas and educated in New York City, was the first fl woman to teach in a public school in Florida.
James attended Atlanta University and, on graduation, became principal of Stanton Grammar School in Jacksonville.
www.si.umich.edu /CHICO/Harlem/text/jwjohnson.html   (223 words)

  
 GeorgiaInfo - Carl Vinson Institute of Government
Johnson was born in Jacksonville, Fla. on June 17, 1871.
In 1917, Johnson obtained a doctorate from Talladega College in Alabama, followed by a doctorate from Howard University in 1923.
Johnson died from the injuries on June 26.
www.cviog.uga.edu /Projects/gainfo/jwjohnson.htm   (297 words)

  
 JAMES WELDON JOHNSON. Free term papers for college, book reports and research papers. Welcome to Get Term Papers
Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson.
Johnson's father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry.
Johnson died soon after Sept 6 the accident at the age of 67 and his wife, who was driving was injured and remained in the hospital for many weeks (Tolbert-Roychaleau 102).
www.gettermpapers.com /essay/009333.html   (1360 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson, 1871-1938 -- Biography
Born James William Johnson in Jacksonville, Florida, on 17 June 1871 —; he changed his middle name to Weldon in 1913 — the future teacher, poet, songwriter, and civil rights activist was the son of a headwaiter and the first female fl public school teacher in Florida, both of whom had roots in Nassau, Bahamas.
Johnson, though, became dissatisfied with the racial stereotypes propagated by popular music and, in 1903, began taking graduate courses at Columbia University to expand his literary horizons.
Johnson died on 26 June 1938 near his summer home in Wiscasset, Maine, when the car in which he was driving was struck by a train.
www.sc.edu /library/spcoll/amlit/johnson/johnson1.html   (795 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson, 1871-1938   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
James Weldon Johnson's mother was a school teacher at the Stanton Institute, the largest Florida high school for African Americans in the 1890s.
From 1930 to his death in 1938, James Weldon Johnson taught at Fisk University in Tennessee and wrote articles urging all persons to rid themselves of racial hatred and to support improved education for all.
James Weldon Johnson was a nationally famous Floridian who was a leader for quality education.
www.firn.edu /webfiles/others/civiced/games/faces/johnson.html   (252 words)

  
 BlackOnBlackRhyme.com :: James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Both James and his younger brother, John Rosamond Johnson, were given music lessons at an early age, and their mother read to them at night from Charles Dickens and other Victorian novelists.
Johnson himself had nearly suffered lynching when a group of white men saw him talking with a very fair-skinned fl female journalist in 1901.
Johnson had lobbied hard for its passage and was bitterly disappointed at its death by Southern Democratic filibuster and Northern Republican indifference.
www.blackonblackrhyme.com /BOBR_Archives/index_0822(jamesweldon).htm   (1141 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
James Weldon Johnson was born in Jacksonville, Florida in 1871, where he and his brother J. Rosamond Johnson grew up.
Their father was the head waitor at a Resort Hotel and their mother, who was born in the Bahamas and eduacated in New York was the first fl woman to teach in a public school in Florida.
Johnson attended Atlanta University and upon graduation became principal of Stanton Grammer School in Jacksonville.
www.arches.uga.edu /~princes8/JWJohnson.html   (340 words)

  
 Jass.com: Bob Cole, J. Rosamond Johnson, and James Weldon Johnson
J. Rosamond and James Weldon Johnson were born in Jacksonville, Florida, James Weldon in 1871 and Rosamond in 1873.
Its success encouraged the team that their goal was not out of reach, and during the next seven years, Cole, Johnson, and Johnson wrote over 200 songs, working in a unique form of collaboration in which they each took turns writing words, composing melody, and acting as critic.
James Weldon Johnson continued to engage in a variety of activities.
www.jass.com /c&j.html   (1375 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938)
Next to James Weldon Johnson's name and date of birth in a biosketch is the familiar catalog of his accomplishments as educator, journalist, lawyer, composer, librettist, poet, novelist, editor, social historian, literary critic, diplomat, fighter for the rights of his people and the rights of all.
Johnson may stand in clearer relief by using an "exchange" pattern of image-making.
The failure of the Johnson legacy to maintain itself with the onset of Marxism and the rise of proletarian literature.
college.hmco.com /english/heath/syllabuild/iguide/johnson.html   (1578 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
As a precursor, participant and historian of the Harlem Renaissance, James Weldon Johnson had as much to do with the rise of that cultural movement as any one person.
Consequently, Johnson as lyricist and his brother Rosamond as composer wrote and staged musical comedies and light operas from 1901 to 1906, producing such enduring songs as "Since You Went Away" and "Lift Every Voice and Sing," now widely known as the fl national anthem.
Johnson was a literature instructor at Fisk University in Tennessee when he died in an automobile crash in 1938.
www.famu.edu /about/admin/vppa/News/Black_History_Moments/James_Weldon_Johnson/james_weldon_johnson.html   (361 words)

  
 Renaissance Collage - Artist Profile::James Weldon Johnson::Essay
Before arriving in Harlem in 1914, Johnson had a career of prolific sorts including work as a high school principal, a lawyer, achieved great success writing songs and plays for New York musicals and was active in the Republican Party and eventually worked in the consular service during the Roosevelt and Taft administrations.
Johnson commented that "The newer Negro poets show a tendency to discard dialect" saying that "much of the subject matter which went into the making of traditional dialect poetry, 'possums, watermelons, etc.," he concluded, "they have discarded altogether" as poetic material.
(Johnson, 41) His argument about dialect is that this "tendency" of Negro writers away from dialect, whether this trend is real or framed through his creation of an anthology, shows that at least some writers did agree with his argument.
xroads.virginia.edu /~MA03/faturoti/harlem/collage/johnson.html   (1116 words)

  
 Johnson, James Weldon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
James Weldon Johnson was an African-American poet, novelist, public school teacher, principal, diplomat, critic, historian, journalist, and lyricist.
Johnson became involved in the 1904 Presidential campaign and through contacts he made in that work ended up with an appointment as US Consul at Puerto Cabello, Venezuela which he undertook in 1907.
James Weldon Johnson was killed in an automobile accident in 1938.
www.wvu.edu /~lawfac/jelkins/lp-2001/johnson_jw.html   (2747 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In 1920, Johnson became the national organizer for the NAACP and was the organization's first executive secretary.
James Weldon Johnson was the "elder statesman" of the Harlem Renaissance.
In 1938, while a professor at Fisk University, James Weldon Johnson was killed in an automobile accident.
www.smarrpublishers.com /JohnsonJW.html   (618 words)

  
 James Weldon Johnson
Born James William Johnson in Jacksonville, Florida, on 17 June 1871 to James Johnson, a headwaiter, and Helen Dillet Johnson, the first female fl public school teacher in Florida, both of whom had roots in Nassau, Bahamas.
Johnson's younger brother, John Rosamond, graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music in 1897, the two began collaborating on a musical theater.
Johnson became professor of creative literature at Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn. He was also visiting professor of creative literature at New York University from 1934 until his death.
www.dejaelaine.com /jwj.html   (1067 words)

  
 African American Registry: James Weldon Johnson,"The Anthems" composer!
*James Weldon Johnson was born on this date in 1871.
From Jacksonville, Florida, Johnson was encouraged to study English literature and the European musical tradition.
Johnson moved to New York in 1901 to collaborate with his brother Rosamond, a composer, and became successful as a songwriter for Broadway, but decided to take a job as U. Consul to Venezuela in 1906.
www.aaregistry.com /african_american_history/2644/James_Weldon_JohnsonThe_An   (338 words)

  
 Preface. James Weldon Johnson, ed. 1922. The Book of American Negro Poetry   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Georgia Douglas Johnson is a poet neither afraid nor ashamed of her emotions.
Johnson’s poems is the secret dread down in every woman’s heart, the dread of the passing of youth and beauty, and with them love.
Johnson often sounds a note of pathos or passion that will not fail to waken a response, except in those too sophisticated or cynical to respond to natural impulses.
www.bartleby.com /269/1000.html   (9621 words)

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