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Topic: Japanese tea ceremony


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Tea

  
  The Japanese Tea Ceremony (Chaji)
The host enters with the chawan (tea bowl) which holds the chasen (tea whisk), chakin (the tea cloth) which is a bleached white linen cloth used to dry the bowl, and the chashaku (tea scoop), a slender bamboo scoop used to dispense the matcha, which rests across it.
Hot water is ladled into the tea bowl, the whisk is rinsed, the tea bowl is emptied and wiped with the chakin.
The tea bowl is more decorative in style; and guests are individually served a bowl of this forthy brew.
www.holymtn.com /tea/Japanesetea.htm   (1487 words)

  
  Japanese tea ceremony (thing)@Everything2.com
The cha no yu, or "tea ceremony," is a famed tradition in Japanese culture in which Japanese green tea, or "cha" is served to a guest according to extremely strict ritual requiring years of practice to master.
The Japanese tea ceremony originated in China and was first brought to Japan during the Heian Era, where it was refined in the 16th century by Sen Rikyu (1522-1591), an aesthete in the retinue of Toyotomi Hideyoshi.
Although the ceremony varies by school, in all cases the ritual is very precisely defined, right down to what angle to lay the utensils, which direction to rotate the bowl and how many times, and what order to do or say each part of the ceremony.
www.everything2.com /index.pl?node_id=1518121   (570 words)

  
  Zen and Leaves: Japanese Tea Ceremony
Today, the ceremony may be performed in a specially designed room in a private house, in a tea house within a private garden, in a designated complex of rooms in the workplace, or in a public tea house.
Ceremonies are held to honour special guests, to celebrate particular occasions such as the blossoming of the cherry trees in Spring, to admire the full moon, or simply to gather together a few friends.
Because the Tea Ceremony involves an understanding and appreciation of a complex combination of sensual and spiritual elements, the training to become a Tea Master is long and demands complete commitment.
www.teamuse.com /article_001001.html   (820 words)

  
 EasternTea: Tea Ceremony
The essence of the Japanese tea ceremony is harmony.
The Japanese tea ceremony had its origins 700 years ago when Zen Buddhist monks began to explore this art form.
Leaving their worries and other worldly affairs aside, the participants in the tea ceremony began to drift into the spirit of the tea ceremony itself.
www.easterntea.com /teaceremony.htm   (336 words)

  
  Japanese tea ceremony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Since a tea practitioner must be familiar with the production and types of tea, with kimono, calligraphy, flower arranging, ceramics, incense and a wide range of other disciplines and traditional arts in addition to his or her school's tea practices, the study of the tea ceremony takes many years and often lasts a lifetime.
Tea ceremonies may take place outside (in which case some kind of seating will usually be provided for guests, whether benches or chairs, or even tatami) or inside, either in a tea room or a tea house, but tea ceremonies can be performed nearly anywhere.
Seiza is integral to the Japanese tea ceremony.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Japanese_tea_ceremony   (5539 words)

  
 Plutschow - Japanese Tea Ceremony
Tea, however, does not call any deity into presence and is not performed to please any deities other than perhaps the great Tea master Sen Rikyu (1521-1591), whose tragic death ordered by the warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536-1598) made him in the eyes of subsequent Tea masters the unquestioned tutelary deity of Tea.
Japanese Tea takes place in a space that is structurally separate from the ordinary, everyday space of human activity and, therefore, seems to correspond to the liminal space Victor Turner discovered in many rituals.
Tea gardens usually come with a path called roji, referring to the Buddhist parable of escaping from the burning house which is the world, and a middle gate beyond which one is supposed to leave the mundane world behind.
www.humnet.ucla.edu /humnet/anthropoetics/ap0501/tea.htm   (8706 words)

  
 Green Tea, White Tea: Japanese Green Tea Ceremony
Preparing For The Tea Ceremony - The Japanese tea ceremony (cha-no-yu, chado, or sado) is a traditional ritual influenced by Zen Buddhism.
The tea ceremony as an art form cuts through a whole spectrum of Japanese culture because it embraces many art forms such as architecture, gardening, ceramics, textiles, calligraphy, flower arrangement, and cuisine, plus a few rather arcane art forms such as the sculpting of ashes and the building of a beautiful fire.
She paid very careful attention to the tea ceremony, but when her son finished she simply said, "Well, dear, you did that very gracefully, but I must say that I can get a cup of tea together much quicker than that." The cup of tea, the end product was the important thing to her.
greentealovers.com /greenteapreparationteaceremony.htm   (7642 words)

  
 Best of Japanese tea ceremony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Japanese tea ceremony (cha-no-yu, chado, or sado) is a traditional ritual influenced by Zen Buddhism in which.
The Japanese tea ceremony is called chanoyu or sado in Japanese and the bitter tea served is. Bilingual magazine examining the traditional Japanese tea ceremony.
The Japanese ideal of life converging with art is best embodied in the tea ceremony, or chanoyu, where setting, utensils, and attendants join together to create a living art form.
japaneseteaceremony.flotea.info /sitemap.htm   (662 words)

  
 Japanese Tea Ceremony
The Japanese tea ceremony is a traditional ritual influenced by Zen Buddhism in which powdered green tea, or matcha, is ceremonially prepared by a skilled practitioner and served to a small group of guests in a tranquil setting.
Cha-no-yu (literally "hot water for tea"), usually refers to a single ceremony or ritual, while sadō or chadō (or "the way of tea") refer to the study or doctrine of tea ceremony.
Even to participate as a guest in a formal tea ceremony requires knowledge of sadō, including the prescribed gestures and phrases expected of guests, and the proper way to take tea and sweets, and general deportment in the tea room.
teabenefitsplus.com /japaneseteaceremony.htm   (199 words)

  
 Leddy :: The Japanese Tea Ceremony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The tea ceremony is a good example of this modification and it also represents a philosophy and appreciation of an important concept: “the appreciation of the subtle, austere beauty that may be discovered in things that seem humble and unassuming” (The Urasenke Chado Tradition 1).
Tea /Cha - According to legend the custom of drinking tea originated in China about 5,000 years ago when a Chinese emperor was sitting under a camellia tree with a pot of boiling water in front of him.
The art of tea is after all a spiritual discipline, and my aspiration for every hour of the day is not to depart from the spirit of the tea, which is by no means a matter of mere entertainment’” (Newman 128).
www.crbs.umd.edu /eastandwest/lessons/leddy-tea.htm   (1621 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony
Based on the four principles; purity, harmony, respect and tranquillity, the tea ceremony, known as chanoyu, is used to teach discipline and instill respect for others.
Tea schools in Japan, which are still in existence today, teach the etiquette and art of tea making.
The tea is served in a china bowl and presented to the guest.
www.stashtea.com /ceremony.htm   (218 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony
The Elements of the Japanese Tea Ceremony are made to be aesthetically and harmoniously suited to every other utensil as to the season and to the ocassion.
According to Japanese Buddhist Monks, the Four Value Principles of the Japanese Tea Ceremony are: Purity, Reverence, Respect and Tranquility.
The Tea Ceremony Utensils - Local link to a glossary that discribes the utensils that the three students from St.Cloud State University used for the Tea Ceremony performance.
www.cloudnet.com /~pamela/JasperStonewareCompany/index.htm   (531 words)

  
 Japanese Tea Ceremony
It was the influence of Zen Buddhist monks who turned the tea ceremony into an opportunity to celebrate the beauty found in common everyday things and in ordinary events; it was a way to show respect for the humble events of life in a simple, rustic way.
The discipline of the ceremony, performing it exactly and in humility for one’s guests was a display of the heart of the belief system of Zen Buddhism.
The center of the ceremony involved an arrangement of shelves on which the tea wares were displayed by the host.
www.tea-n-teapots.com /10502-japanese-tea-ceremony.html   (579 words)

  
 Tea Ceremony Utensils
The foot which the Japanese consider to be a very important part of the bowl varies, from twenty to eighty percent of the bowls’ overall diameter and in height from one to thirty percent of its height.
A part of the tea ceremony grew out of gatherings hosted by samurai and aristocrats, whose purpose was the viewing of beautiful imported artifacts (in the case of samurai, spoils of war).
The Raku kiln was established by Chojiro (1516-1592) at the direction of the tea master Sen-no Rikyu for the purpose of producing tea bowls to use in his tea ceremonies.
dmh.net /raku98/RAKU.html   (1150 words)

  
 Japanese Green Tea, Japanese Tea Pots, Japanese Tea Sets, Testubin Japanese Tea Set
Quality japanese green tea, japanese tea pots, tetsubin japanese tea set, japanese tea sets for serving green tea and japanese tea ceremony supplies for use for the japanese tea ceremony.
Bamboo tea whisks are a traditional utensil used for the japanese tea ceremony for blending powdered green tea.
Bamboo ladles are often placed in Japanese tea gardens for cleansing of the hands and mouth with water is used as an act of purifying the mind and body.
www.garden-gifts.com /dtea.htm   (636 words)

  
 Japanese Culture - Arts - Sado, Tea Ceremony
And study of the tea ceremony is still considered part of the 'proper' education of any aspiring young 'lady'.
The chaji, or tea ceremony is usually held in a cha-shitsu (tea-room).
A celebrant of the tea ceremony holds a chasen (bamboo brush) used to stir and mix the tea.
www.japan-zone.com /culture/sado.shtml   (837 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony in Philadelphia
The bowl (chawan), tea scoop (chashaku), the container the tea is held in (natsume or chaire), and the tea itself (matcha) are especially important.
So far, Japanese tea is not so different from the rituals surrounding British high tea -- both have their own etiquette, a set of rules that includes the proper way of doing everything.
During that period, tea was imported from China to Japan, as priests returning from their Buddhist studies brought the practice of brewing tea along with them.
www.phillytea.org /whatis.html   (1789 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony
Before the event he or she will carefully select the artwork to be displayed and the Japanese tea cups that will be used.
In Japanese, that perfect atmosphere is summed up by the phrase wa-kei-sei-jaku, which means "Harmony, Reverence, Purity, and Tranquility." The guests, in turn, will do their best to support the tea philosophy of Ichigo Ichi-e, which means "We only have one chance to enjoy this present moment.
JAPAN TEA CEREMONY This article is a short summary of what the tea plant and the tea ceremony mean to Japanese culture.
www.rothteien.com /landing/tea/chanoyu.htm   (480 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony
Acording to Japanese sources, tea was first brought to Japan from China by the priest Eisai in 1191 and drunk in Japanese temples as a form of medicine.
In the 9th century a tea ceremony, developed by Chinese masters around the Taoist philosophy of "living in the moment", may have been introduced to Japan at the same time.
Rikyu was employed as the personal tea master of the powerful warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and he was not always able to practice his humble form of tea, but his style was embraced by the wealthy merchants of Osaka, Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo), many of whom added their own embellishments.
www.gotheborg.com /qa/teaceremony.shtml   (693 words)

  
 eBay Guides - The Japanese Green Tea Ceremony
The Japanese tea ceremony is a ritualized way of preparing and drinking tea which was perfected in the latter half of the 18th century by Sen-no-Rikyu.
Great tea parties were held in which guests were invited to sample a wide variety of teas and guess their origin.
Tea ceremonies are held in traditional Japanese rooms in cultural community centres or private houses.
reviews.ebay.com /The-Japanese-Green-Tea-Ceremony_W0QQugidZ10000000000914166   (1686 words)

  
 Japanese Tea Ceremony
The Japanese tea ceremony (called cha-no-yu, chado, or sado) is a special way of making green tea (matcha?茶).
It is used to clean the tea scoop and tea caddy.
When people go into the tea room they take off their shoes and sit on a special kind of floor called tatami.
www.kakuzo.com /japanese_tea_ceremony.html   (495 words)

  
 The Japanese Tea Ceremony
The Japanese Tea Ceremony as such is a ritualized procedure for entertaining guests that puts into practice the aesthetic and spiritual principles of Zen Buddhism.
After studying tea under Zen masters he stripped everything non-essential from the tea room and the style of preparation and developed a tea ritual in which there was no wasted movement and no superfluous object.
Rikyu was employed as the personal tea master of the powerful warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and he was not always able to practice his humble form of tea, but his style was embraced by the wealthy merchants of Osaka, Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo), many of whom added their own embellishments.
gotheborg.com /qa/teaceremony.shtml   (693 words)

  
 TEA CEREMONY
The Japanese tea ceremony (cha-no-yu, chado, or sado) is a traditional ritual influenced by Zen Buddhism in which powdered green tea, or matcha (抹茶;), is ceremonially prepared by a skilled practitioner and served to a small group of guests in a tranquil setting.
Cha-no-yu (茶の湯, literally "hot water for tea"), usually refers to a single ceremony or ritual, while sado or chado (茶道, or "the way of tea") refer to the study or doctrine of tea ceremony.
Pictures are from the Japan Festival where a tea ceremony was conducted.
www.japaneselifestyle.com.au /culture/japanese_tea_ceremony.html   (211 words)

  
 Japanese Tea Ceremony
Morning tea in the winter is served at 7 A.M. The summertime hour is chosen for appreciation of the flowers/plants used for decoration and the winter time is chosen since this is considered the time best suited to enjoy the air in all its freshness and appreciate the beauty of newly-fallen snow.
Just before the ceremony is to take place the host must also sweep the garden and its path, sprinkle the path with water, make sure the tea room and the rest of the area is extremely clean and also has to arrange the tea utensils in the proper order.
It is a tea for the connoisseur and is served with sweets.
www.bookmice.net /darkchilde/japan/jtea.html   (2845 words)

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