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Topic: Jean Jacques Rousseau


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
 MSN Encarta - Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), French philosopher, social and political theorist, musician, botanist, and one of the most eloquent writers of the Age of Enlightenment.
Jean Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva on June 28, 1712, and was raised by an aunt and uncle following the death of his mother a few days after his birth.
Rousseau’s unconventional views antagonized French and Swiss authorities and alienated many of his friends, and in 1762 he fled first to Prussia and then to England.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761551924   (645 words)

  
 Confessions (Jean-Jacques Rousseau) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Confessions is an autobiographical book by Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Augustine of Hippo's Confessions, the book from which Jean-Jacques Rousseau took the title for his own book.
For instance, Rousseau recounts an incident when, while a servant, he covered up his theft of a ribbon by framing a young girl who was working in the house for the crime.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Confessions_(Jean-Jacques_Rousseau)   (408 words)

  
 Rousseau, Jean-Jacques [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born to Isaac Rousseau and Suzanne Bernard in Geneva on June 28, 1712.
Rousseau is at the same time trying both to justify his actions to the public so that he might gain its approval, but also to affirm his own uniqueness as a critic of that same public.
Rousseau’s praise of humans in the state of nature is perhaps one of the most misunderstood ideas in his philosophy.
www.utm.edu /research/iep/r/rousseau.htm   (8029 words)

  
 Rousseau, Jean Jacques on Encyclopedia.com
Rousseau was born at Geneva, the son of a watchmaker.
Rousseau's style, in all his writings, is always personal, sometimes bizarre, sometimes rhetorical, sometimes bitterly sarcastic, sometimes deliberately plebeian, and often animated by a tender and musical quality unequaled in French prose.
Rousseau's educational proposal is highly artificial, the process is carefully timed and controlled, but with the end of allowing the free development of human potential.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/R/RousseauJ1.asp   (1568 words)

  
 Jean-Jaques Rousseau and informal education
Rousseau believed it was possible to preserve the original nature of the child by careful control of his education and environment based on an analysis of the different physical and psychological stages through which he passed from birth to maturity (Stewart and McCann 1967).
Rousseau believes that by the time Émile is fifteen, his reason will be well developed, and he will then be able to deal with he sees as the dangerous emotions of adolescence, and with moral issues and religion.
Rousseau's exploration of education took the form of a novel concerning the tutoring of a young boy.
www.infed.org /thinkers/et-rous.htm   (5071 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-78).
Jean Jacques Rousseau, born at Geneva, was deserted by his family at age 10.
Rousseau's concept of a social contract (viz., that there existed unstated reciprocal obligations between the people and government) is not near as upsetting as his view that the existing social conventions should be immediately upset like a barrow of apples at the Saturday morning market: every apple, all at once, to be bruised and kicked.
What Rousseau failed to observe or appreciate is that the state is an "organic organ" which has evolved over a very long time and runs (and can only run) on culture and custom: on tradition.
www.blupete.com /Literature/Biographies/Philosophy/Rousseau.htm   (830 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau at Erratic Impact's Philosophy Research Base
The most enigmatic of all the philosophies of the 18th century Enlightenment, the political philosopher, educationist and essayist, Jean Jacques Rousseau, was born at Geneva on June 28th, 1712.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau was the most influential political philosopher of the eighteenth century.
Rousseau's most celebrated theory was that of the "natural man." In his Discourse on the Inequalities of Men (1754) and Social Contract (1762) he maintained that human beings were essentially good and equal in the state of nature but were corrupted by the introduction of property, agriculture, science, and commerce.
www.erraticimpact.com /~modern/html/modern_jean_jacques_rousseau.htm   (1048 words)

  
 Malaspina Great Books - Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712)
Rousseau was one of the first modern writers to seriously attack the institution of private property, and therefore is considered a forebearer of modern socialism and Communism.
In his earlier writings Rousseau identified nature with the primitive state of savage man. Later, especially under the criticism of Voltaire, Rousseau took nature to mean the spontaneity of the process by which man builds his personality and his world.
Rousseau is buried in The Pantheon , Paris.
www.malaspina.org /home.asp?topic=./search/details&lastpage=./search/results&ID=169   (3641 words)

  
 Glossary of People: Ro
Rousseau's most famous work is Discourse on the Origin of Inequality Among Men, in which he shows how social conditions, and in particular private property, lead to inequality and the whole range of social ills.
Emile (and the later Sophie) are unstructured, almost stream-of-consciousness works in which Rousseau uses narrative and dialogue with a fictious son (and daughter) to expound his theory of child development, pedagogy and sociology.
Along with Diderot, Voltaire and others, Rousseau was a part of the Enlightenment which laid the basis for the French Revolution, and was on the "Left Wing" of that movement.
www.marxists.org /glossary/people/r/o.htm   (3635 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The "natural state", Rousseau claimed, could only be achieved via wholesale social reform which, in its ultimate manifestation, envisioned not Hobbes's "equilibrium" of competing wants, but rather a collective state with extra-personal dedication to a "General Will".
However, Rousseau's paranoid nature and bitterness annoyed even the good-natured Hume, and soon enough, he returned to France, where he wandered in poverty until his death in 1778.
Only in such a state, Rousseau asserted, could the true "natural man" exist and be truly free.
cepa.newschool.edu /het/profiles/rousseau.htm   (528 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau
One of the most enigmatic thinkers of the 18th century, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's colourful life and consistent defiance of social conventions are reflected in his political writings.
Rousseau argued that these were merely the seductive characteristics of a modern society in which mankind had lost his natural liberty and entered a moral decline.
In 1750 Rousseau wrote his Discourse on the Sciences and the Arts for a competition at the academy of Dijon, in which he established the themes which he was to develop in much of his subsequent political philosophy.
www.philosophers.co.uk /cafe/phil_jun2003.htm   (864 words)

  
 JEAN JACQUES ROUSSEAU
Sentenced to prison, his father fled Geneva leaving Jean Jacques to be raised by his wife's sister.
Rousseau states that the tutor can only stand by at this period of the child's development, ensuring that the child does not acquire any bad habits.
Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712.
www.cals.ncsu.edu /agexed/aee501/rousseau.html   (1351 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Wikiquote
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (June 28, 1712 – July 2, 1778) was a Franco-Swiss philosopher of Enlightenment whose political ideas influenced the French Revolution, the development of socialist theory, and the growth of nationalism.
1.4 Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1770, published 1782)
Wikisource has original works written by or about Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
en.wikiquote.org /wiki/Jean-Jacques_Rousseau   (4495 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Jean-Jacques Rousseau : Restless Genius: Books: Leo Damrosch
Rousseau (1712–1778) was the man, we should recall, who consigned his own infants to a foundling home, who sent a miserably small sum of money to his ailing former patroness and who bought an adolescent girl for nefarious purposes.
Rousseau's contemporary, the arch-conservative Edmund Burke, labeled him "the Socrates of the National Assembly" (that is, of the hated French Revolution).
Especially as far as the first half of Rousseau's life are concerned, the main task of the biographer is to recount a story that has already been written, correcting the occasional misremembering or misrepresentation, and to comment upon it.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0618446966?v=glance   (3367 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau was an Enlightenment philosopher who lived from 1712 to 1778.
In the spring of 1778 Jean-Jacques went to live with a long time admirer the Marquis de Girardin.
Rousseau was unlike most Enlightenment thinker in that he was a philosopher.
www.tallett.com /fr312k/PAR308/ROUSSEAU   (639 words)

  
 BrothersJudd.com - Review of Jean Jacques Rousseau's The Social Contract
Though RousseauÕs evocative imaginary depictions of primitive societies were to swell the tide of nineteenth?century romantic "nostalgia" for the simple life, he himself insisted that there was no escape from history.
Contrary to Hobbes and Locke, Rousseau contended that it was civil society, not nature, that gave rise to a state of affairs that was always in danger of degenerating into war.
RousseauÕs lyrical descriptions of early man and simple societies fueled the nineteenth?century popular romantic revolt against classicism in art and literature.
www.brothersjudd.com /index.cfm/fuseaction/reviews.detail/book_id/1267   (2140 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Confessions (Penguin Classics): Books: Jean-Jacques Rousseau,J. M. Cohen
Jean Jacques Rousseau was born in 18th century France, to a middle class family that was wealthy enough to give him a chance at schooling.
In his Confessions Jean-Jacques Rousseau tells the story of his life, from the formative experience of his humble childhood in Geneva, through the achievement of international fame as novelist and philosopher in Paris, to his wanderings as an exile, persecuted by governments and alienated from
Rousseau and his philosophy, outlined in Confessions, was one of the driving forces behind the French revolution, especially among the Jacobins.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/014044033X?v=glance   (1701 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Voltaire
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, in his dramatic opening lines to his immensely powerful treatise "The Social Contract," wrote that man was naturally good but becomes corrupted by the pernicious influence of human society and institutions.
Rousseau's influence both in art and politics was huge in his own day and continues to be strong today.
In fact, it would be hard to ever envision the urbane and suave Voltaire and the radically democratic Rousseau ever seeing eye to eye on much: Voltaire believed that through education and reason man could separate himself from the beasts while Rousseau thought that it was precisely all this which made men "unnatural" and corrupted.
www.rjgeib.com /thoughts/rousseau/rousseau.html   (543 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau -- Biography
Confessions, Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques (published posthumously in
Rousseau escaped to Bern, Switzerland, but was later banished from the canton, and arrived in England.
The young Rousseau remained in Geneva with a poor relation for six years, and left the city when he was sixteen to travel Sardinia and France after his conversion to Catholicism.
www.english.upenn.edu /Projects/knarf/Rousseau/bio.html   (623 words)

  
 HistoryWiz: Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Rousseau, 1712-1778, was a French philosopher and author, who wrote in the later enlightenment period.
He differed from the earlier enlightenment thinkers in focusing on the passionate side of man's nature and rejecting the worship of pure reason.
www.historywiz.com /rousseau.htm   (1262 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jean Jacques Rousseau ( June 28, 1712 – July 2, 1778) was a Franco-Swiss philosopher, writer, political theorist, and self-taught composer of The Age of Enlightenment.
Rousseau contended that man was good by nature, a " noble savage " when in the state of nature (the state of all the "other animals", and the condition humankind was in before the creation of civilization and society), but is corrupted by society.
Rousseau was one of the first modern writers to seriously attack the institution of private property, and therefore is often considered a forebearer of modern socialism and communism (see Karl Marx, though Marx rarely mentions Rousseau in his writings).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jean-Jacques_Rousseau   (1262 words)

  
 Rousseau
Rousseau sired but refused to support several illegitimate children and frequently initiated bitter quarrels with even the most supportive of his colleagues.
Although the authorities made every effort to suppress Rousseau's writings, the ideas they expressed, along with those of Locke, were of great influence during the French Revolution.
Pursuit of the arts and sciences, Rousseau argued, merely promotes idleness, and the resulting political inequality encourages alienation.
www.philosophypages.com /ph/rous.htm   (347 words)

  
 Modern History Sourcebook: Rousseau: Social Contract, 1763
Jean-Jacques Rousseau stresses, like John Lockem the idea of a social contract as the basis of society.
From Jean­Jacques Rousseau, Contrat social ou Principes du droit politique (Paris: Garnier Frères 1800), pp.
Locke's version emphasised a contact between the governors and the governed: Rousseau's was in a way much more profound - the social contract was between all members of society, and essentially replaced "natural" rights as the basis for human claims.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/mod/Rousseau-soccon.html   (2166 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau
Rousseau stays in Geneva in the charge of his mother's relations.
oregonstate.edu /instruct/phl302/philosophers/rousseau.html   (322 words)

  
 Rousseau, Jean-Jacques
The Rousseau of recent feminism does not come to us directly, but is filtered through the deconstructionist readings of Jacques Derrida and Paul de Man, who concentrated very precisely on the leftovers, the "trash" excluded whenever politics or literature claimed to be able to determine the status of the language of a Rousseauian text.
Rousseau's contribution is, first and foremost, a theory and practice of writing, of textual undecidability, of figurative language.
Rousseau has also been credited with having almost single-handedly brought about the literary revolution that was Romanticism, discovering the possibilities of the first-person imaginative subject, giving the public a taste for tales of passionate error and equally passionate repentance, exploring what would become Romanticism's dominant themes and literary devices.
www.press.jhu.edu /books/hopkins_guide_to_literary_theory/jean-jacques_rousseau.html   (322 words)

  
 Rousseau, Jean-Jacques: The Social Contract
How, as Rousseau himself asks, can one enter into an agreement which limits one's power without thereby "harming his own interests and neglecting the care he owes to himself?"
Man is born free; and everywhere he is in chains.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~wldciv/world_civ_reader/world_civ_reader_2/rousseau.html   (722 words)

  
 Jean Jacques Rousseau Collection at Bartleby.com
Shaw, G.B. Stein, G. Stevenson, R.L. Wells, H.G. Authors > Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > Jean Jacques Rousseau
One statement of Rousseau’s principles of religious faith.
The movers of the French Revolution would embrace the ideas elaborated herein.
www.bartleby.com /people/RousseauJ.html   (111 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The "natural state", Rousseau claimed, could only be achieved via wholesale social reform which, in its ultimate manifestation, envisioned not Hobbes's "equilibrium" of competing wants, but rather a collective state with extra-personal dedication to a "General Will".
However, Rousseau's paranoid nature and bitterness annoyed even the good-natured Hume, and soon enough, he returned to France, where he wandered in poverty until his death in 1778.
Only in such a state, Rousseau asserted, could the true "natural man" exist and be truly free.
cepa.newschool.edu /het/profiles/rousseau.htm   (111 words)

  
 Amazon.com: e-Books & Docs: The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau [DOWNLOAD: MICROSOFT READER]
Jean Jacques Rousseau was born in 18th century France, to a middle class family that was wealthy enough to give him a chance at schooling.
In his Confessions Jean-Jacques Rousseau tells the story of his life, from the formative experience of his humble childhood in Geneva, through the achievement of international fame as novelist and philosopher in Paris, to his wanderings as an exile, persecuted by governments and alienated from the world of modern civilization.
Rousseau and his philosophy, outlined in Confessions, was one of the driving forces behind the French revolution, especially among the Jacobins.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000059SBO?v=glance   (111 words)

  
 Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Rousseau was, as he himself relates, suffering from "a case of the vapors" (Rousseau would forever view himself as persecuted by both men and disease; the Scottish philosopher David Hume even commented that this hypersensitivity made him seem like a man lacking an outer layer of skin).
Rousseau characterized his brief sojourn at Les Charmettes as "the short period of my life’s happiness." Here he nursed his physical and psychosomatic ailments with long walks in the woods in the arms of maman, gardening, and in a vast campaign of reading and study to compensate for the proper education he had never received.
Rousseau most likely arrived in town in 1732 (his Confessions, as he himself admits, are rather loose on the chronology, if not more consequential facts), in the company of Madame de Warens.
www.literarytraveler.com /europe/rousseau.htm   (111 words)

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