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Topic: Jenny Geddes


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  Jenny Geddes
The legendary Jenny Geddes famously threw her stool at the head of the minister in St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, beginning the riot that led to the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, which included the English Civil War.
The first use of the prayer book was in St Giles' on Sunday 23 July 1637, when John Hanna, Dean of Edinburgh, began to read the Collects, part of the prescribed service, and Jenny Geddes, a market-woman or street-seller, threw her stool straight at the reverend's head.
In the aftermath of the riots definitive evidence is hard to come by, and some doubt if Jenny Geddes started the fight or if she even existed, but she remains a part of Edinburgh tradition and has long had a memorial in St Giles.
encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com /pages/11478/Jenny-Geddes.html   (387 words)

  
 Jenny Geddes - ScotWars
Vegetable seller Jenny Geddes, attending morning service in St Giles, the High Kirk of Edinburgh, on 23 July 1637, is said to have picked up her stool and hurled it at the minister.
That flying furniture led to the Scottish National Covenant, the English Civil War, the execution of Charles and the conquest of Scotland by Cromwell.
Jenny, known as the ‘Princess of the Tron adventurers’, the street traders whose market place was only a few yards further down the Royal Mile, was concerned to preserve the style of worship that had been familiar in her local church.
www.scotwars.com /html/jenny_geddes.htm   (168 words)

  
 Jenny Geddes
Jenny Geddes’s stool was, therefore, the first act of the revolutionary tumult affecting much of the 17th century.
This shows that Geddes was still thought to be living in 1670, so for a start if this is true she could not have been an “old woman” at the original event as later commentators have said.
Chambers implies that Geddes only said “Deil colic the wame o’ ye!”, and that the part about the Mass is a conflation of a story in Balfour’s Stoneyfield pamphlet, where he says that a woman smacked a man in the face after the riots for saying “Amen” loudly in her ear.
inamidst.com /lo/geddes   (1886 words)

  
  Jenny Geddes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Jenny (or Janet) Geddes was a Scotch woman, a native of that land of great minds and heroic champions of Calvinistic orthodoxy.
There were present archbishops, bishops, the lords of the session, the magistrates of the city, members of the council, "chief captains and principal men," and Jenny Geddes and her stool.
It was the first formidable outbreak against the tyranny of the Stuarts, and Jenny Geddes' stool was the first shell sent screaming through the air at those merciless oppressors of the two realms, and the echoes of that shell are reverberating to-day among the hills.
www.fpcr.org /blue_banner_articles/jgeddes.htm   (0 words)

  
  Jenny Geddes at AllExperts
The legendary Jenny Geddes famously threw her stool at the head of the minister in St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, beginning the riot that led to the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, which included the English Civil War.
The first use of the prayer book was in St Giles' on Sunday 23 July 1637, when John Hanna, Dean of Edinburgh, began to read the Collects, part of the prescribed service, and Jenny Geddes, a market-woman or street-seller, threw her stool straight at the reverend's head.
In the aftermath of the riots definitive evidence is hard to come by, and some doubt if Jenny Geddes started the fight or if she even existed, but she remains a part of Edinburgh tradition and has long had a memorial in St Giles.
en.allexperts.com /e/j/je/jenny_geddes.htm   (695 words)

  
 The Caledonian Call
Jenny Geddy is one of the most colorful Scots associated with the Reformation.
Jenny Geddes' party at St. Giles signed the death warrant of civil and ecclesiastical tyranny in both Scotland and England!
Jenny Geddes' stool was the first shot fired in the forging of Scottish religious freedom!
kenmorris.org /scots_geddy.html   (298 words)

  
 Page 442   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
GEDDES, JENNY: According to the popular story, a Scottish " herb-woman " who instigated a riot in St. Giles's Church, Edinburgh, on Sunday, July 23, 1637.
A herb-woman of the same name is said to have given her stall to be burned in a bonfire at the rejoicings in honor of the coronation of Charles II.
A folding stool, the very one used by Jenny Geddes, it is said, is exhibited in the National Museum of Antiquities in Edinburgh.
www.ccel.org /s/schaff/encyc/encyc04/htm/0458=442.htm   (978 words)

  
 Jenny Geddes Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Almost nothing is known about Jenny Geddes (even, for certain, whether she ever really existed at all), but there is a memorial to her in the cathedral.
It is generally assumed that at the start of the service she was occupying a stool in the body of the kirk.
This placed financial stress on his administration, and to raise new taxes he needed to recall the English Parliament, which started the process that led to the English Civil War; to his own execution; and to Cromwell's occupation of Scotland...
www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk /usbiography/biographies/jennygeddes.html   (551 words)

  
 Robert Burns Country: The Burns Encyclopedia: Geddes, Jenny
June 1787, Burns described his jouney on Jenny Geddes during the Border tour at great length and in Scots.
Jenny Geddes trode over me with such cautious reverence that matters were not so bad as might well have been expected; so I came off with a few cuts and bruises, and a thorough resolution to be a pattern of sobriety of the future.'
Jenny Geddes is the name tradition has given to the woman who, on 23
www.robertburns.org /encyclopedia/GeddesJenny.383.shtml   (546 words)

  
 jennasname
Jenny was a Scottish woman, dedicated to Presbyterian doctrine, born around the end of the sixtenth century.
On that next Sabbath day Jenny was there in church sitting on her milk stool as usual.
Jenny's strength in standing up for her beliefs sparked others to do the same and the attempt to abolish Presbyterianism was abandoned.
www.pf-productions.com /jennasname.html   (798 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The signature dance of the sadly defunct Jenny Geddes Clog Morris from Edinburgh.
They taught it to us last year, and we are now dancing it regularly in order to keep it in use.
This garland dance represents various features of the town of Whitby, and was taught to us by Jenny Geddes Clog Morris.
www.belfagan.org.uk /dance.htm   (401 words)

  
 July 23: Jenny Geddes throws a stool in church
July 23, 1637 •; Jenny Geddes Hurled a Stool in Church.
One, identified as Jenny Geddes, picked up her stool and hurled it at the dean.
Dozens of other objects also were thrown at the clergy by the outraged populace and, when the bishop remonstrated, a stool was hurled at him, too, but missed its mark.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2001/07/daily-07-23-2001.shtml   (588 words)

  
 Robert Burns References to Loch Lomond and Dumbarton
Local Burns lovers have always been happy to relate the tale of Rabbie's journey through the district, when he was made freeman of Dumbarton.
I had heard references to his night on Loch Lomond side and his ill-fated race with a local "Highlandman" down the lochside on his horse, Jenny Geddes.
Jenny Geddes trode over me with such cautious reverence, that matters were not so bad as might well have been expected; so I came off with a few cuts and bruises, and a thorough resolution to be a pattern of sobriety for the future.
www.robertburns.org.uk /lochlomond_dumbarton.htm   (1190 words)

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