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Topic: Jerusalem artichoke


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  Jerusalem artichoke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The artichoke part of the Jerusalem artichoke's name comes from its taste of its edible tuber, which is a cross between a radish and a artichoke.
Jerusalem artichokes were cultivated by the Native Americans (who called them "sun roots") long before the arrival of the Europeans.
Jerusalem artichokes are trivial to cultivate, the ease of which tempts gardeners to simply leave them completely alone to grow.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jerusalem_artichoke   (412 words)

  
 Artichoke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Artichokes are three types of vegetables in the daisy family Asteraceae.
When unqualified, the term "artichoke" nearly always refers to the globe artichoke, of which the aboveground part is eaten, in contrast to the other two, where a root part is eaten.
The Jerusalem artichoke Helianthus tuberosus is a species of sunflower.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Artichoke   (202 words)

  
 Jerusalem Artichoke
Jerusalem artichoke tubers resemble potatoes except the carbohydrates composing 75 to 80% of the tubers are in the form of inulin rather than starch.
Although the Jerusalem artichoke is a viable fructose source, the U.S. sugar industry has been hesitant in utilizing it because farmers have been concerried with its potential as a weed problem, and because it requires extra planting and harvesting equipment along with storage difficulties.
Jerusalem artichokes are propagated vegetatively by the use of sound, disease-free small tubers or pieces of tubers weighing approximately 2 oz and having at least 2 to 3 buds each.
www.hort.purdue.edu /newcrop/afcm/jerusart.html   (2079 words)

  
 Hybrids Between Jerusalem Artichoke and Sunflower
A distinguishing mark of Jerusalem artichoke, and in particular of variety Belyi Kievskii, is the red-brown anthocyanin coloring of the stem, particularly of its upper part.
Achenes of parents and hybrids 1 - achene of Jerusalem artichoke; 2 - achene of F1 hybrid 3 - achene of F2 hybrid; 4 - achene of sunflower.
The hybrids between Jerusalem artichoke and sunflower also possess very good qualities as fodder plants: their green matter contains up to 12% of sugars and up to 3% (of the fresh weight) of digestible protein; the hybrids are on a level with corn in fodder value and are superior to sunflower grown for silage.
www.bulbnrose.com /Heredity/sunflowerXchoke/sunflowerXchoke.html   (5361 words)

  
 Jerusalem artichoke
The artichoke became a staple food for North American pilgrims and was thought of as a new feed in a "new Jerusalem." A second theory is that the word Jerusalem is a twisting of the Italian word for sunflower-girasol.
Although the Jerusalem artichoke is a viable fructose source, the U.S. sugar industry has been hesitant in utilizing it because farmers have been concerned with its potential as a weed problem, and because it requires extra planting and harvesting equipment along with storage difficulties.
Response of Jerusalem artichokes to nitrogen (N) and potas- sium (K) fertilizer on leached, sand soil at the Staples Irrigation Center, Staples, MN – 1981.
corn.agronomy.wisc.edu /AlternativeCrops/JerusalemArtichoke.htm   (2060 words)

  
 Floridata: Helianthus tuberosus
Jerusalem artichoke is a type of sunflower that is grown for its edible tuberous roots as well as its pretty yellow flowers.
Jerusalem artichokes can be stored fresh in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for several weeks, but it's better to leave them in the ground until you need them.
Jerusalem artichokes were cultivated by Native Americans who introduced them to the first white settlers in the early 1600s.
www.floridata.com /ref/h/heli_tub.cfm   (961 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Jerusalem artichoke, Plant (Plants) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Jerusalem artichoke, tuberous-rooted perennial (Helianthus tuberosus) of the family Asteraceae (aster family), native to North America, where it was early cultivated by the indigenous inhabitants.
Jerusalem artichoke is more favored as a food plant in Europe (where it was introduced in 1616) and China than in North America, where it is most frequently grown as stock feed.
Jerusalem artichokes are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/J/Jerusal-ar.html   (242 words)

  
 Jerusalem Artichoke, Commercial Vegetable Production Guides, North Willamette Research and Extension Center   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Jerusalem Artichoke tubers may be stored at 31 to 32 F and 90-95% relative humidity for 4-5 months.
Jerusalem artichokes may be packaged in cartons and boxes, loose packed, 20-25 lb each.
Although Jerusalem artichokes are known to be one of the best sources of raw product for the manufacture of fuel alcohol and fructose sugar, because of alternative raw products and other considerations these uses have not been economically successful in the Pacific Northwest to date.
oregonstate.edu /Dept/NWREC/artichje.html   (582 words)

  
 CNN.com - Food Central - Key Ingredient - By any name, Jerusalem artichokes are a delight - January 31, 2000
Jerusalem Artichokes are knobby roots related to the Sunflower with a crunchy, tangy taste.
Turn the Jerusalem artichokes in the butter to coat, season with salt and white pepper, garnish with chopped parsley and serve as you would potatoes for a lighter taste and fewer calories.
Jerusalem artichokes (helianthus tuberosus) are available from early fall through the winter and into early spring in most of the United States.
www.cnn.com /FOOD/key.ingredient/jerusalem.artichokes   (1054 words)

  
 Jerusalem Artichokes
Jerusalem artichokes are not artichokes at all but a member of the sunflower family.
The Jerusalem artichoke is a tuber that grows underground like the potato, where the tubers cling to the roots.
The Jerusalem artichoke is often called a starchy plant, but the starch is in the form of inulin, a polysaccharide from which fructose can be produced.
www.geocities.com /artichokebc   (326 words)

  
 Vegetarians in Paradise/ Jerusalem Artichoke History, Jerusalem Artichoke Nutrition, Jerusalem Artichoke Recipe
The Jerusalem artichoke has no relatives in the artichoke family but is actually a member of the sunflower family.
Our sleuths have surmised that when Jerusalem artichokes arrived in Italy sometime before 1633, the Italian word for sunflower, "girasole" which means "turning to the sun," was somehow later corrupted into the word "Jerusalem." This corruption combined with Champlain's likening the taste of the vegetable to an artichoke brings our mystery to a close.
The Jerusalem artichoke is a tuber that grows underground like the potato but is harder to harvest because the tubers cling to the roots and become entwined.
www.vegparadise.com /highestperch26.html   (1471 words)

  
 botanical.com - A Modern Herbal | Artichoke, Jerusalem - Herb Profile and Information
---Habitat---The Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus, Linn.), now commonly cultivated in England for its edible tubers, another of the numerous Sunflowers, is a native of the North American plains, being indigenous in the lake regions of Canada, as far west as Saskatchewan, and from thence southward to Arkansas and the middle parts of Georgia.
Its name, Jerusalem Artichoke, does not, as it seems, imply that it grows in Palestine, but is a corruption of the Italian Girasola articiocco, the Sunflower Artichoke, Girasola meaning 'turning to the sun,' an allusion to the habit it is supposed to have in common with many of the Sunflower tribe.
Jerusalem Artichokes afford a useful screen for a wooden fence, when planted along the foot of it, but the more open the spot, the more likely they are to prosper.
www.botanical.com /botanical/mgmh/a/artic065.html   (967 words)

  
 Artichoke, Jerusalem -- Helianthus tuberosus L.
The Jerusalem artichoke is a tuberous rooted perennial better adapted to the northern parts of the United States than to Florida.
Do not confuse it with the globe artichoke of which the edible bud is a gourmet's delight.
Although the Jerusalem artichoke is not as well adapted to Florida as to other parts of the country, it is grown satisfactorily in gardens around the state.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu /MV012   (549 words)

  
 healthy recipes, cooking, jerusalem artichokes
The botanical name of the Jerusalem artichoke is Helianthus tuberosus, meaning that it is from the sunflower family (which it is) and that it's a root (two for two).
Jerusalem artichokes were part of the cornucopia found by Europeans when they began exploring and settling the New World.
Jerusalem artichokes that have been cold-stored for a month or more (in the ground or under refrigeration) will have less gas than ones purchased earlier in the season.
www.samcooks.com /relish/jerusalem_artichokes.htm   (1707 words)

  
 A.R.E. Health & Rejuvenation Research Center - The Cayce Health Database
Jerusalem artichoke is a vegetable which resembles a small potato.
Jerusalem artichoke is a primary therapy in the Cayce approach to diabetes.
Do use the Jerusalem Artichoke at least once a week in the diet, but only cooked in its own juices - or mix the juices in which it is cooked with the bulk of the artichoke; that is, cook it in Patapar paper.
www.edgarcayce.org /health/database/chdata/data/thjartic.html   (2580 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - artichoke, Plant (Plants) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The French, or globe, artichoke (Cynara scolymus) is a thistlelike plant of which the globular flower heads are used in the immature state as a salad or vegetable; only the lower part of the fleshy bracts ("leaves") and the center ("heart") are eaten.
The other artichoke plant is the Jerusalem artichoke.
Artichokes are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/artichok.html   (209 words)

  
 Jerusalem artichoke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The common name does not refer to Jerusalem, but is said to be a corruption of "girasole", Italian for "turn-sun".
The Jerusalem artichoke has edible, underground tuberous rhizomes that form in the autumn.
Jerusalem artichoke is aggressive and can be difficult to control when planted.
www.lib.ksu.edu /wildflower/jerusalem.html   (207 words)

  
 Helix Slim | Weight Loss Diet Pill | Appetite Suppressants | Jerusalem Artichoke | Mehndi Skin Art Distributor
Jerusalem artichoke is the ideal food for slimming and eliminating excess water and toxins.
Jerusalem Artichoke tubercle is a source of inulin, a unique complex sugar.
Jerusalem Artichoke reduces the feeling of hunger and is therefore useful in low-calorie diets to control « the munchies ».
www.mehndiskinart.com /helix_slim_weight_loss_pill.htm   (649 words)

  
 Jerusalem artichoke: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Jerusalem artichoke is a type of the sunflower, EHandler: no quick summary.
The globe artichoke (cynara scolymus) is a perennial, thistle-like plant, originating in southern europe around the mediterranean....
Jerusalem artichokes were cultivated by the Native American[Click link for more facts about this topic]s (who called them "sun roots") long before the arrival of the Europe Europe quick summary:
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/j/je/jerusalem_artichoke.htm   (1122 words)

  
 When is an artichoke not an artichoke? / Chef has penchant for weird-looking veg
The prevalent theory is that "Jerusalem" derives from girasole, the Italian word for sunflower, because this vegetable is, in fact, a member of the sunflower family.
The artichoke part of the name probably is derived from the fact that the flesh vaguely resembles the heart of an artichoke, both in taste and texture.
Jerusalem artichokes can be sliced thinly and used raw, but at Chapeau, the favored method is to cook them in water or chicken stock ("extra flavor!" says Gardelle), then puree them.
www.sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2004/03/10/FDGTF5EE611.DTL   (897 words)

  
 WHAT IS A JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Jerusalem artichokes (also known as sunchokes) are not related to the green, globe artichokes seen in stores.
The "Jerusalem" part of the name is also misleading since the plant is a native of North America and has been used as a food crop on this continent for hundreds of years.
Jerusalem artichokes are actually a close relative of sunflowers, a resemblance which is quite evident when one sees the plants in bloom.
www.ces.ncsu.edu /copubs/news/garden_cleveland/2010-11/3.html   (559 words)

  
 Artichokes -- Jerusalem
Unlike the globe artichoke, which is closely related to the thistle, the Jerusalem artichoke is a relative of the Peruvian sunflower.
Tasting a little like a water chestnut or a Brazil nut, the Jerusalem artichoke is high in starch and indigestible carbohydrates, particularly that of the complex sugar known as inulin, which is made up of units of fructose.
The Jerusalem artichoke is rich in dietary fiber, folate, and magnesium, as well as being a good source of calcium, iron (on par with meat), phosphorus, potassium, Vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and B6.
www.innvista.com /health/foods/vegetables/artjeru.htm   (704 words)

  
 Jerusalem Artichoke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Jerusalem Artichoke is a hairy, tuber-bearing perennial from the sunflower family (Compositae).
Scrub Jerusalem artichokes and cook in simmering water 30 to 40 minutes, until tender.
Put the sliced artichokes into a well-buttered gratin dish or shallow flame-proof casserole, seasoning with salt, pepper and the merest hint of crushed garlic between layers.
www.indianspringherbs.com /jerusalem_artichoke.htm   (650 words)

  
 Jerusalem Artichoke, Sunchoke
Jerusalem artichokes have a crunchy texture and a sweet, nutty flavor.
Jerusalem artichokes can be found in the produce section of most health food stores, specialty markets, and supermarkets.
Select Jerusalem artichokes that are firm and fresh looking, avoiding those with a soft texture or wrinkled skin.
www.truestarhealth.com /Notes/1792008.html   (805 words)

  
 Artichoke, Food Resource [http://food.oregonstate.edu/], Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
The artichoke, Cynara scolymus, is the flower bud of a thistle-like plant, which is grown primarily in the vicinity of the city of Castroville, CA.
Artichoke stem (approximately 38 g NSP kg 1) was similar to the receptacle (approximately 34 g NSP kg 1) but bracts were heavily lignified.
Knowledge of C and nutrient element allocation/reallocation in the Jerusalem artichoke is of value for improving fertilization strategies and in identifying critical traits for the selection of new, high yielding cultivars.
food.oregonstate.edu /v/arti.html   (2273 words)

  
 Jerusalem artichoke growing information
Jerusalem artichokes produce a large numbers of edible tubers.
They are especially good for diabetics as they contain no starch, the carbohydrate is in the form of inulin and laevulin, which are readily metabolised as the natural sugar, laevulose.
Jerusalem artichoke needs a good supply of potassium, this can be supplied with wood ash, avoid high nitrogen fertilisers or the tops will grow at the expense of the roots.
www.greenharvest.com.au /Plants/jerusalem_artichoke_info.html   (326 words)

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