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Topic: Jessie Fauset


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
  Jessie Redmon Fauset - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jessie Redmon Fauset (April 27, 1882 - April 20, 1961) was an African American editor, poet, essayist and novelist.
Fauset was born in Snow Hill, New Jersey in Camden County as the daughter of Anna Seamon and Redmon Fauset, an African Methodist Episcopal minister.
Fauset graduated from Cornell University in 1905, possibly the first fl woman in Phi Beta Kappa, and came to the NAACP's journal, The Crisis, in 1912 when it was only 16 months old.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jessie_Fauset   (318 words)

  
 Modernism and Prestige
So, given all the traditions that Fauset appears to be cut off from, her work stands in the peculiar position of being considered a few contradictory things at once: too Victorian to be modern, too bourgeois to be fl, and both too fl and too genteel to be feminist.
Against these trends in Fauset-criticism, I want to contend that Jessie Fauset is indeed a fl feminist modernist and that her novels are in fact integral to the cultural moment in which they are published.
Fauset is not writing Victorian novels, but rather she is parodying their structures ironically to assert her own reactions to modernity.
www.english.upenn.edu /~jenglish/Prestige/MacMaster.htm   (1464 words)

  
 Jessie Fauset - The Black Renaissance in Washington, DC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Fauset did not possess the characteristics generally associated with the Renaissance: she was older, reserved in demeanor, meaningfully employed, and her lifestyle was not bohemian in nature.
Miss Fauset is often referred to as an “older sister figure” to the younger writers, “midwife” of the Renaissance, and “provider of yeoman’s work for the Negro Renaissance.” In all respects, her services and contributions to the movement were appreciated and her novels endorsed by the established fl critics of the day.
Jessie Redmon Fauset, the seventh child of Redmon and Annie Seamon Fauset, was born in Camden County, New Jersey, a suburb of Philadelphia.
www.dclibrary.org /blkren/bios/fausetjr.html   (1160 words)

  
 VG: Artist Biography: Fauset, Jessie Redmon
Jessie Fauset wrote all four of her novels in the remarkably prolific years between 1924 and 1931.
Fauset's remaining novels, The Chinaberry Tree and There is Confusion, both hinge upon the complications which arise in a culture in which procreative relationships between the races are common but are not legally sanctioned.
Jessie Fauset has often been criticized for portraying her almost exclusively upper-middle class characters as exemplars of "what the race is capable of doing" (Christian 41).
voices.cla.umn.edu /vg/Bios/entries/fauset_jessie_redmon.html   (1009 words)

  
 Beth Carol Aplin-Rollins -- Africana Library, Cornell University
As a detailed biographical sketch of Jessie Fauset's life and in an analysis of her writings that is informed by her life, this thesis both confirms and challenges previous scholarly research on Fauset's life and writing.
The fourth chapter presents a review of portions of Fauset's writing for periodicals and anthologies through a focus on her book reviews, articles, and essays with the purpose of determining how this work adds to the understanding of her life and her novels.
Fauset's writing, which incorporates a multitude of genres, reveals both a vehement racial consciousness and a progressive, and at times, radical feminist consciousness.
www.library.cornell.edu /africana/thesis/aplinrollins1995.html   (405 words)

  
 Black Reader - Jessie Fauset
Jessie Fauset, essayist, editor, and novelist, displayed in her work the complexities of life for literary artists during the Harlem Renaissance and the Great Depression.
After completing her master's degree in French in 1920, she was invited to become The Crisis's literary editor, holding the job until 1923 and afterward becoming the managing editor.
Fauset left The Crisis in 1927 to achieve a more ordered life as a French teacher at De Witt Clinton High School.
www.blackreader.com /profiles/fauset.html   (205 words)

  
 New Crisis, The: Jessie Fauset: Midwife to the Harlem renaissance
New Crisis, The: Jessie Fauset: Midwife to the Harlem renaissance
Jessie Fauset joined The Crisis magazine and became at once its "astute guiding spirit," according to Darlene Clark Hines in Black Women in America.
Fauset wrote hundreds of stories, poems and articles in the 24 issues of the magazine as well as handled its correspondence and all the editing.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3812/is_200007/ai_n8923356   (949 words)

  
 Harmon Collection   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Jessie Fauset, the most published novelist of the Harlem Renaissance, was living in retirement in Montclair, New Jersey, when Laura Wheeler Waring painted her portrait for the Harmon collection.
From 1919 to 1926, Fauset was the indispensable associate of W.E.B. Du Bois in the publication of the NAACP magazine "The Crisis." Persuading Du Bois that creative writing could be a source of racial uplift, Fauset cultivated the talents of young poets and novelists.
Laura Wheeler Waring and Fauset were old friends when she painted Fauset's portrait for the Harmon Foundation.
www.npg.si.edu /exh/harmon/fausharm.htm   (240 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Books: Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
I was so impressed with how Ms Fauset wrote Plum Bun, that upon completing the book I have been actively purchasing all of her other books that are in print.
Fauset was one of the most underrated members of the Harlem Renaissance.
Fauset is one of my literary favorites, and a woman that I truly admire.
www.amazon.ca /exec/obidos/ASIN/0863580572   (633 words)

  
 Introducing Jessie Redmon Fauset -- Lawnside Historical Society, Inc.
Miss Fauset was born in Snow Hill (the old name for Lawnside) on April 26, 1882.
Her father the Rev. Redmon Fauset was pastor of Mount Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal Church.
It was Langston Hughes who called Miss Fauset the mid-wife of the Harlem Renaissance for nurturing him and others by providing an outlet and pay for their published work.
petermotthouse.org /news/JessieFauset.html   (418 words)

  
 PAL: Jessie Redmon Fauset(1884-1961)
"A Sardonic, Unconventional Jessie Fauset: The Double Structure and Double Vision of Her Novels." College Language Association Journal 22 (1979):.
Johnson, Abby A. "Literary Midwife: Jessie Redmon Fauset and the Harlem Renaissance." Phylon 39 (Sumr 1978): 143-53.
"Jessie Redmon Fauset, Black American Writer: Her Relationshops, Biolgraphical and Literary, with Black and White Writers, 1910-1935." Dissertation Abstracts International 37 (1977):.
www.csustan.edu /english/reuben/pal/chap9/fauset.html   (265 words)

  
 Hecate: Reclaiming a legacy: the dialectic of race, class, and gender in Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Dorothy ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Hecate: Reclaiming a legacy: the dialectic of race, class, and gender in Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Dorothy West.
Reclaiming a legacy: the dialectic of race, class, and gender in Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Dorothy West.
Fauset's stories and articles usually advanced the ideals of family, religion and culture in depicting the positive side of fl people, while Hurston was more preoccupied with protesting societal inequalities and admonished to preserve the traditions of African Americans.
highbeam.com /library/doc0.asp?DOCID=1G1:21059508&refid=ip_almanac_hf   (240 words)

  
 St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture: Jessie Redmon Fauset
Writer Jessie Redmon Fauset represented the emergence of an authentic African-American voice in American literature.
As literary editor from 1919 to 1926, Fauset encouraged fl writers, serving as a mentor to such artists as Langston Hughes, who said she was one of the "midwives" of the Harlem Renaissance.
Fauset wrote four novels, There Is Confusion (1924), Plum Bun (1929), The Chinaberry Tree (1931), and Comedy, American Style (1933).
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g1epc/is_bio/ai_2419200385   (283 words)

  
 Alibris: Jessie R Fauset
by Fauset, Jessie Redmon, and Knopf, Marcy (Foreword by)
The Chinaberry Tree (1931), Fauset's third novel, is a tale of the lives and loves of two generations of African-American women.
Comedy: American Style (1933), Fauset's fourth and last published novel, is the tragic story of how color prejudice and racial self-hatred result in the destruction of a family.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Jessie_R_Fauset   (252 words)

  
 Jessie Redmon Fauset -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Jessie Redmon Fauset (April 27, 1882 - April 20, 1961) was an (Click link for more info and facts about African American) African American editor, poet, essayist and novelist.
She was the most prolific female novelist of the (A period in the 1920s when African-American achievements in art and music and literature flourished) Harlem Renaissance.
There Is Confusion (novel, (Click link for more info and facts about 1924) 1924) (about a light-skinned African American who temporarily (Click link for more info and facts about passes for white) passes for white)
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/j/je/jessie_redmon_fauset.htm   (341 words)

  
 Words! Words!
by Jessie Redmon Fauset, it made me reflect the many experiences I personally express to those that I love, particular, the love of my life, Demetrius, through words.
Jessie Redmon Fauset is a unique poetic writer born on April 27, 1882 in Frederickville, New Jersey, to Anna Seamon Fauset and Reverend Redmon, a Minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Snow Hill, an all fl community founded by Quakers as a home for escaped slaves.
When she was still a young child the family moved to Philadelphia, Jessie went to the Philadelphia High School for Girls and years later attended Cornell University.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/harlem_renaissance/67509   (491 words)

  
 The San Antonio College LitWeb Jessie Redmon Fauset Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Two of Ms Fauset's poems appear in The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader, pp.
From 1919 until 1926 Ms Fauset was literary editor of the magazine Crisis, W.E.B. Dubois, editor.
From 1920 -1921 she edited and contributed regularly to The Brownie's Book, the child's counterpart of the Crisis, the NAACP magazine.
www.accd.edu /sac/english/bailey/fauset.htm   (142 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Books: Black Family (Dys)Function in Novels by Jessie Fauset, Nella Larson, & Fannie Hurst   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Amazon.ca: Books: Black Family (Dys)Function in Novels by Jessie Fauset, Nella Larson, and Fannie Hurst
Black Family (Dys)Function in Novels by Jessie Fauset, Nella Larson, and Fannie Hurst
Top of Page : Black Family (Dys)Function in Novels by Jessie Fauset, Nella Larson, and Fannie Hurst
www.amazon.ca /exec/obidos/ASIN/0820451592   (290 words)

  
 Find in a Library: Jessie Redmon Fauset, black American writer
Find in a Library: Jessie Redmon Fauset, fl American writer
Subjects: Fauset, Jessie Redmon -- Criticism and interpretation.
WorldCat is provided by OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc. on behalf of its member libraries.
www.worldcatlibraries.org /wcpa/ow/4a05403f43a37035.html   (75 words)

  
 Powell's Books - Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral by Jessie R. Fauset
Powell's Books - Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral by Jessie R. Fauset
Read the original essay by Laila Lalami, and save 30% on Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits
Plum Bun is a fine example of the hidden Harlem Renaissance--where the women were writers too."
www.powells.com /cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=65-0807009199-1   (171 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral: Books: Jessie Redmon Fauset   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
About a month before seeing this book, I read THE POWER OF PRIDE, a coffee table book on the Harlem Renaissance which contained some wonderful photos.
Having read...PRIDE, I noticed that something about this particular edition of PLUM BUN really bothers me. The portrait drawing on the front of the book looks more like Nella Larsen than it does Jessie Fauset.
Unless Ms.Marks and Ms.Edkins, the compilers of...PRIDE, got their photos mixed up, the picture on the front of PLUM BUN is Nella Larsen--not Jessie Fauset.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0807009199?v=glance   (1092 words)

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