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Topic: Jewish Autonomous Oblast


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  Jewish Autonomous Oblast
Unfortunately for the Jewish migrants, there was a good reason why virtually nobody lived in this region: the winters are extremely harsh, the roads were practically nonexistent, and the land was swampy.
The Jewish population was essentially inactive until the late 1980s an early 1990s, when there was something of a revival in Birobidzhan.
Jewish Autonomous Oblast is favourably enough located from the economic - geographical attitude on the Far East.
russia.rin.ru /guides_e/2392.html   (321 words)

  
  ooBdoo
Pogroms in the Russian Empire led Jewish philanthropists such as the Montefiores and the Rothschilds to sponsor agricultural settlements for Russian Jews in Palestine in the late 1870s, culminating in a small group of immigrants from Russia arriving in the country in 1882.
While traditional Jewish belief held that the Land of Israel was given to the ancient Israelites by God, and that therefore the right of the Jews to that land was permanent and inalienable, most Orthodox groups held that the Messiah must appear before Israel could return to Jewish control.
Haredi Jewish opinion was overwhelmingly negative, with several Hasidic groups calling Zionists the personification of Satan, blaming Zionism for the Holocaust, accusing them of being the source of all evil in the world and defiling the entire world with their impurity.
www.oobdoo.com /wikipedia/?title=Zionism   (8689 words)

  
 Britain.tv Wikipedia - OZET   (Site not responding. Last check: )
By the end of 1920s, there were 160 Jewish selsovets (rural councils) in Ukraine, 29 in the Crimean peninsula (Crimea did not belong to Ukraine at the time), and 27 in Belarus.
To increase the prestige of settling the Far East, the Soviet government raised the status of the autonomy and in 1934 JAO was declared an autonomous republic; the city of Birobidzhan became its capital and was to become the center of Jewish culture.
In the 1937, its leadership and ranks were decimated in the Great Purge and in May 1938 the agency was liquidated by special order by the Central Committee of the CPSU as a "corner of various counter-revolutionary Bundist elements, turncoats and spies".
www.britain.tv /wikipedia.php?title=OZET   (971 words)

  
 。*.。 Pun 。*.。: Minority Peoples and Their Territories   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The republic was established in 1920 as an autonomous oblast.
In 1920 Chuvashia became an autonomous oblast, and in 1925 it was redesignated an autonomous republic.
The autonomous oblast of Mari was established in 1920; an autonomous republic was designated in 1936.
hellopun.spaces.live.com /Blog/cns!8F8BE58579ABA6A2!156.entry   (6941 words)

  
 World Jewish Congress
Jewish religious articles and books were smuggled into the country, and clandestine study and worship groups were established, but the great majority of Soviet Jews had access to neither.
Jewish newspapers in the Russian language appear in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Samara, Omsk, Yekaterinburg, Nalchik, and Perm.
In the Historical Museum of Birobidzhan, one of the permanent exhibits is called "To Be or Not To Be: Repressed Jewish Culture in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast." In the same city, there is also a museum devoted to themes from the Bible.
www.worldjewishcongress.org /communities/ussr/comm_russia.html   (1134 words)

  
 Zionism definition and history
Pogroms in Russia led Jewish philanthropists such as the Montefiores and the Rothschilds to sponsor agricultural settlements for Russian Jews in Palestine in the late 1870s, culminating in a small group of immigrants from Russia arriving in the country in 1882.
Its priorities were the escalation of Jewish settlement in Palestine, the building of the institutional foundations of a Jewish state, raising funds for these purposes, and persuading - or forcing - the British authorities not to take any steps which would lead to Palestine moving towards independence as an Arab-majority state.
The emergence of Israel as a Jewish state with a small Arab minority made the idea irrelevant, but it was revived after the 1967 war left Israel in control of a large Arab population.
www.thirdworldtraveler.com /Israel/Zionism_def_history.html   (5232 words)

  
 European Jewish Congress - The Jewish Community of Russian Federation
The Jewish community living in the territory of Russia proper is of relatively recent origin.
Jewish religious articles and books were smuggled into the country, and clandestine study and worship groups were established, but the great majority of Soviet Jews had access to neither.
Jewish newspapers in the Russian language appear in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Samara, Omsk, Yekaterinburg, Nalchik, and Perm.
www.eurojewcong.org /ejc/news.php?id_article=136   (1099 words)

  
 Jewish Autonomous Oblast - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
During the civil war, the territory of the future Jewish Autonomous Oblast was the scene of terrible battles.
The Jewish administrative division was founded with the help of Komzet in 1928 as the Jewish National District.
Once again, the Jewish leadership was arrested and efforts were made to stamp out Yiddish culture—even the Judaica collection in the local library was burned.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jewish_Autonomous_Oblast   (2032 words)

  
 Geographic Travels with Catholicgauze!: Stalin's Zion - Jewish Autonomous Region
So in 1934 in the Far East along the Chinese border the Jewish Autonomous Region (JAR) was established as an outpost of European communism in an Asian land.
Today the Jewish population of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast is less than two percent officially (some estimates have it up to fifteen percent with people hiding their Jewish identities).
A sort of revival is going on with the Jewish population there as a new synagogue built in 2004 and schools are offering Yiddish again.
catholicgauze.blogspot.com /2007/11/stalins-zion-jewish-autonomous-region.html   (627 words)

  
 Copyright
These included assimilationist narodniki, for whom all Jewish issues were subordinate to the struggle for general liberation from Tsarist oppression; Bundists who fused the Marxist cause of proletarian revolution with a call for Jewish "national-cultural autonomy"; and Zionists who argued that the Jewish nation could thrive only once it had established its own homeland.
Gitelman provides an excellent brief history of grass-roots Jewish voluntary and cultural associations, which in their lively disputes over the best means of promoting Jewish cultural interests seem to be reprising many of the basic debates among Jewish organizations of the early twentieth century.
Gitelman frets that Jewish identity in the Post-Soviet era is a Soviet construct, a "passport identity" that has left Jews "others" even after the specifically Jewish "content" has been drained out of their lives.
www.ess.uwe.ac.uk /GENOCIDE/reviewas21.htm   (2965 words)

  
 Russia - Local and Regional Government
Under the 1993 constitution, the republics, territories, oblasts, autonomous oblast, autonomous regions, and cities of federal designation are held to be "equal in their relations with the federal agencies of state power"; this language represents an attempt to end the complaints of the nonrepublic jurisdictions about their inferior status.
Despite constitutional language equalizing the regional jurisdictions in their relations with the center, vestiges of Soviet-era multitiered federalism remain in a number of provisions, including those allowing for the use of non-Russian languages in the republics but not in other jurisdictions, and in the definitions of the five categories of subunit.
Under the power given him in 1991 to appoint the chief executives of territories, oblasts, autonomous regions, and the autonomous oblast, Yeltsin had appointed virtually all of the sixty-six leaders of those jurisdictions.
countrystudies.us /russia/72.htm   (2242 words)

  
 Russian Judaism, Judaism of Russia, reform Judaism, Orthodox Judaism, Messianic Judaism, Conservative Judaism in ...
For the next 120 years, tsarist governments restricted Jewish settlements to what was called the Pale of Settlement, established by Catherine II in 1792 to include portions of the Baltic states, Ukraine, Belorussia, and the northern shore of the Black Sea.
During the nineteenth century, restrictions on the Jewish population were alternately eased and tightened.
As part of Soviet ethnic policy, the Jewish Autonomous Oblast (Yevreyskaya avtonomnaya oblast', later called Birobidzhan) was established in 1934.
www.russiansabroad.com /russian_history_137.html   (1386 words)

  
 Vladivostok News focus page
There are Jewish clubs, a small synagogue, and a weekly class where 107 children study Jewish culture and history - funded in part by the region's department of education.
During the height of the purges, in 1936 to 1938, the state closed the Yiddish schools, dismantled the institutions for Jewish agricultural settlement, and ended efforts to attract Jewish colonists.
Now the oblast administration celebrates Jewish holidays in the House of Culture, and there are Jewish clubs and soup kitchens for the elderly.
vn.vladnews.ru /Arch/2000/ISS207/focus.html   (2170 words)

  
 JAR - The Government Official Website
Nikolai Volkov, the governor of the Jewish Autonomous Region met with the appointed general director of OAO “Dalsvyaz” Anton Kolpakov
It was mentioned during the meeting of the delegations of the Jewish Autonomous Region and the province of Heilongjiang, which was held last days off in the Government of...
Reference to the Jewish Autonomous Region official government website is obliged in case of full or partial use of materials from this website.
eao.ru /eng   (972 words)

  
 Information About Russian Region Jewish Autonomous Oblast.
The Jewish population was essentially inactive until the late 1980s an early 1990s, when there was something of a revival in Birobidzhan.
Jewish Autonomous Oblast is favourably enough located from the economic - geographical attitude on the Far East.
Belgorodskaya Oblast I Bryanskaya Oblast I Chelyabinskaya Oblast I Chitinskaya Oblast I Chukotsky AO I Evenksky AO I Irkutskaya Oblast I Ivanovskaya Oblast
www.russianbrideguide.com /about_russia/regions/jewish-ao.shtml   (511 words)

  
 Politics of Russia
The ten autonomous regions and Birobidzhan are p art of larger jurisdictions, either an oblast or a territory.
(In the 1995 elections, Moscow Oblast received nearly 38 percent of the State Duma's seats based on the concentration of party-list candidates in the national capital.) Shumeyko contended that such misallocation fed potentially dangerous popular discontent with the parliament and politicians.
Despite constitutional language equalizing the regional jurisdictions in their relations with the center, vestiges of Soviet-era multitiered federalism remain in a number of provisions, including those allowing for the use of non-Russian languages in t he republics but not in other jurisdictions, and in the definitions of the five categories of subunit.
www.stranslation.com /Russian_Translation/politics_of_russia.htm   (10770 words)

  
 Russian, Chinese Agreement on Use of Border Islands, Nov. 13, 1997
That the RF Ministry of Foreign Affairs conduct negotiations with the Chinese side and, upon achieving accord, that it sign this Agreement on behalf of the RF Government, having been permitted to enter changes and additions, which are not in the nature of a principle, into the attached draft.
Expenditures to send the representatives of Primorskii and Khabarovsk krais, the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, and Amur and Chita oblasts to the city of Moscow on the mission are to be put down to the budgets of the organs of executive authority of the appropriate components of the Russian Federation.
Expenditures to organize the negotiations in the indicated krais and oblasts (making facilities available for the negotiations, assigning transport, carrying out representative and cultural measures) are to be put down to the budgets of the organs of executive authority of the appropriate components of the Russian Federation.
www.shaps.hawaii.edu /fp/russia/china-agreement-971113.html   (387 words)

  
 Birobidzhan – FREE Birobidzhan Information | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, Information!
The Jewish Autonomous Region, known as Birobidzhan, astonishingly still exists.
With its capital at Birobidzhan, the Jewish autonomy was meant to...
Mari El, Mordovia, North Ossetia-Alania, Sakha, Tatarstan, Tuva, and Udmurt; one autonomous region (or oblast): Jewish (Birobidzhan); five autonomous national areas (okrugs): Agin-Buryat, Chukotka, Khanty-Mansi, Nenets, and Yamalo-Nenets; 47 Russian regions...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-X-Birobidz.html   (587 words)

  
 Travel East Russia - Jewish Autonomous Oblast
"In the northern southwest corner of the Khabarovski Krai on the border of China is the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, a district set up in 1928 to settle the "Jewish Question." Its history is an interesting one.
In March of 1928, the government allotted an area in the Amur River Basin for "settlement by working people of the Jewish Nationality." By creating a special area for the Jews in sparsely populated regions of the Russian Far East, the Soviet government hoped to accomplish several things.
In the Jewish Autonomous Republic migration came to a halt.
www.traveleastrussia.com /jewish.html   (424 words)

  
 [No title]
The Krays and Oblast have substantial baseline data for the Project, including information on fire incidence (records over nearly 50 years), vast experience in fire management, fire prevention and elimination of its consequences, in the development of the protected area system.
The Khabarovsk Kray Administration and the governments of the neighboring Primorsky Kray and Jewish Autonomous Oblast, in cooperation with the Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia and other partners, are able and willing to organize the remaining feasibility studies for the Project, as well as Project preparation and implementation.
Budget The main objective of the PDF Block B grant is to prepare the GEF Project in Primorsky and Khabarovsk Krays and in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, with a proper participatory approach.
www.gefweb.org /Projects/Pipeline/Pipeline_5/Russian_Fire.doc   (3823 words)

  
 Jewish Autonomous Oblast travel guide - Wikitravel
Russia's Jewish Autonomous Oblast is a region in Southeastern Russia, which borders Amur Oblast to the west, Khabarovsk Krai to the north, and China to the south.
The Oblast's "Jewish" status has led to some odd Soviet-Jewish art, such as the menorah monument in the city center, but did not lead to mass Jewish immigration - Jews constitute only about 2% (although there are some reports that is is up to 16%) of this region's population.
Yiddish shares official status with Russian, but you are unlikely to hear it aside from a synagogue visit or on the one Yiddish radio station.
wikitravel.org /en/Jewish_Autonomous_Oblast   (344 words)

  
 Blazons of Jewish Autonomous Oblast Towns
Jewish Autonomous Oblast: "The Coat of Arms of Jewish Autonomous Oblast represents a heraldic French shield (ratio of width to height of 8:9) aquamarine colours, at upper and bottom of which the narrow horizontal strips consisting of white, light-blue and white strips, equal among themselves on width making
In center of the arms the gold ussurian tiger with fl stripes according to natural colouring is represented.
The figure of a tiger is turned to the right from the spectator, that specifies a unusual history and original path of development of Oblast".
heraldry.hobby.ru /eng/eng.eao.html   (103 words)

  
 News
The Social Protection Department of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast (Far East) decided to start up the project “Self-Sufficiency” in 2008.
This project was included into the oblast’s program “Family and Children of the Jewish Autonomous Area”.
The decision to apply this tool was made by the Jewish Autonomous Oblast after the IUE had provided the oblast with the information on the tool’s design and the experience of other Russian localities that had been using the tool.
www.urbaneconomics.ru /eng/news.php?folder_id=1&mat_id=49&page_id=295   (128 words)

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