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Topic: Jewish exodus from Arab lands


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  The Treatment of Jews in Arab/Islamic Countries
While Jewish communities in Arab and Islamic countries fared better overall than those in Christian lands in Europe, Jews were no strangers to persecution and humiliation among the Arabs and Muslim.
When the Jews of Medina refused to convert and rejected Muhammad, two of the major Jewish tribes were expelled; in 627, Muhammad's followers killed between 600 and 900 of the men, and divided the surviving Jewish women and children amongst themselves.
The situation of Jews in Arab lands reached a low point in the 19th century.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/anti-semitism/Jews_in_Arab_lands_(gen).html   (1338 words)

  
  Jewish exodus from Arab lands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Jewish exodus from Arab lands refers to the 20th century emigration of Jews, primarily of Sephardi and Mizrahi background, from majority Arab lands.
Disruption overall was significant: the ancestors of many Jews had resided within Arab lands for centuries before the advent and spread of Islam in the seventh century CE.
Jewish communities, like Christian ones, were typically constituted as semi-autonomous entities managed by their own laws and leadership, who carried the responsibility for the community towards the Muslim rulers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jewish_exodus_from_Arab_lands   (3652 words)

  
 Jewish refugees - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The British Mandate of Palestine prohibited Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel.
The practice of expelling the Jews accompanied by confiscation of their property, followed by temporary readmissions for ransom, was used to enrich the crown: expulsions from Paris by Philip Augustus in 1182, from France by Louis IX in 1254, by Charles IV in 1322, by Charles V in 1359, by Charles VI in 1394.
The Banu Qurayza tribe was slaughtered and the Jewish settlement of Khaybar was ransacked.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jewish_refugees   (699 words)

  
 Arab - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ʻarab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa.
During the 8th and 9th centuries, the Arabs (specifically the Umayyads, and later Abbasids) forged an empire whose borders touched southern France in the west, China in the east, Asia Minor in the north, and the Sudan in the south.
The "Arabized Arabs" (musta`ribah) of North Arabia, descending from Adnan, supposed to be a descendant of Ishmael (Ismail), the eldest son of Abraham and Hagar.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/a/r/a/Arab.html   (2529 words)

  
 Arab - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Arabs believe that they are descendants of Shem, son of Noah based on the writings of the Qur'an, Torah and the Bible.
Is used for defining the Arabs who are traditionally considered to be descendants of Abraham through his son Ishmael through his son Adnan, and they are known as Adnanite: it is defined of the Arabs who settled in Mecca when Abraham took his Egyptian wife Hagar or (Hajar) and his son Ishmael to Mecca.
Arab Muslims are Sunni, Shia, Ibadhite, Alawite, Ismaili or Druze.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Arab   (2830 words)

  
 THE FORGOTTEN REFUGEES: the causes of the post-1948 Jewish Exodus from Arab Countries
The Jewish exodus from Iraq was influenced by, and coincided with, a wave of bombings which took place between April 1950 and June 1951.
On the one hand, Arab denial of the contribution made by anti-Jewish hostility to the Jewish exodus from Iraq and elsewhere is insensitive and ahistorical.
Jewish refugees from Arab lands should be entitled to some form of compensation for abandoned lands and property.
www.ajds.org.au /mendes_refugees.htm   (3768 words)

  
 THE FORGOTTEN REFUGEES: the causes of the post-1948 Jewish Exodus from Arab Countries
Their exodus is attributed not to anti-Semitism, but rather to a malicious Zionist conspiracy including instances of bomb-throwing aimed at achieving mass Jewish emigration to Israel (Hirst 1977; Wolfsohn 1980; Shiblak 1986; Alcalay 1993:45-51; Bahry 1996:111; Gat 1997:2; Abu Shakrah 2001).
On the one hand, Arab denial of the contribution made by anti-Jewish hostility to the Jewish exodus from Iraq and elsewhere is insensitive and ahistorical.
Jewish refugees from Arab lands should be entitled to some form of compensation for abandoned lands and property.
www.labyrinth.net.au /~ajds/mendes_refugees.htm   (3768 words)

  
 The Illegal Palestinian Occupation of Israel and Jewish Explusion from Arab Lands
The Jewish exodus from Arab lands refers to the 20th century emigration of Jews, primarily of Sephardi and Mizrahi background, from majority Arab lands.
Jewish communities, like Christian ones, were typically constituted as semi-autonomous entities managed by their own laws and leadership, who carried the responsibility for the community towards the Muslim rulers.
By 1971, the Jewish population was down to 35,000; however, most of this wave of emigration went to Europe and North America rather than Israel.
www.theoccupation.net   (3510 words)

  
 Remembering the Forgotten Exodus
All Arabs who stayed in Israel enjoy full citizenship; the few Jews who remained in Arab lands continue to experience persecution, attacks, jail and other violations of human rights.
After rejecting the UN resolution which called for a Jewish state, and after their defeat in the battlefield, when they failed to drive the Jews into the sea, the Arab countries developed a brilliant scheme.
Acknowledging the Jewish refugees from Arab lands, and understanding the hidden agenda behind a Palestinian "right of return" as well as the obstructive role played by both the Arab states and UNRWA in the refugee issue, are the first steps to restoring a sense of justice to the Middle East narrative.
www.ujc.org /page.html?ArticleID=43816   (1482 words)

  
 Backgrounder: The Jewish Exodus, Part III
Jewish life in Yemen, up to the time of Israel's modern evacuation of the community, contained the harshest elements imaginable under dhimmitude status.
The exchange of Arab and Jewish populations in and around Israel's War of Independence cannot be equated, as the circumstances perpetuating the refugee movements prove vastly different.
In contrast, the Jewish residents of Arab countries were, almost without exception, forcefully expelled from their homelands and robbed of their wealth and livelihoods by government-planned, anti-Semitic campaigns meant to eliminate from their midst the "pariah" Jewish presence.
www.cdn-friends-icej.ca /medigest/dec99/backgrnd.html   (995 words)

  
 Palestinian exodus - Free net encyclopedia
The 'Arab leaders endorsement of the refugee flight' was the official line taken by the governments of Israel and mainstream Israeli Historians, assigning the main responsibility for the exodus to calls made by local and foreign Arab leaders.
While not discounting other reasons for the exodus, the 'transfer principle' theory suggests that this prevalent 'attitude of transfer' is what made it easy for local Haganah and IDF commanders to resort to various means of expelling the Arab population, even without a 'master plan' or a blanket command given by Israeli authorities.
Plan D was aimed to establish Jewish sovereignty over the land allocated to the Jews by the United Nations (Resolution 181), and to prepare the ground toward the expected invasion of Palestine by Arab states after the imminent establishment of the state of Israel.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Nakba   (6026 words)

  
 Free Articles at www.workboatforsale.com
The situation of the Palestinian Arab refugees is one of the world's largest and most enduring refugee problems.
Arab governments did not grant refugees citizenship and did not provide funds to improve the conditions in refugee camps.
The Arab League issued instructions barring the Arab states from granting citizenship to Palestinian Arab refugees (or their descendants) "to avoid dissolution of their identity and protect their right to return to their homeland".
www.workboatforsale.com /ferry.php?q=Pale   (2608 words)

  
 Jews in Arab Occupied Lands
The Exodus from Egypt, the liberation of the Children of Israel from slavery, is a universal human theme.
In that year, another great Jewish Exodus occurred, leading to a large increase in the population of Israel and the decimation of some of the oldest Jewish communities on earth.
From the Arab point of view that was indeed as stupid a policy as the Arab incitement of the Russian population against the Jews in that country.
www.jbuff.com /c042503.htm   (1181 words)

  
 Pierre Rehov's Middle East Documentaries
And, while the Arab armies were preparing to invade the young refugee-country, the survivors of the Shoah were piling up in rickety boats.
Israel is the keeper of a mutilated Arab identity, the repository for the guilty consciences of the Arab peoples, the living witness to a true history of the Arab countries, continuously denied, falsified and ignored.
In fact 'the Silent Exodus' testifies that anti-Semitism and the pogroms against the Jews of the Middle East preceded the birth of the state of Israel and the advent of ideological pan-Arabism and pan-Islamism.
www.pierrerehov.com /exodus.htm   (1395 words)

  
 JTA NEWS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Justice for Jews From Arab Countries was launched Monday to publicize the “historical truth” of Jewish refugees from Arab countries, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Richard Holbrooke, said Monday.
The new group is not interested in a lawsuit against the Arab League proposed in June by Amram Attias, president of the International Committee of Jews From Arab Lands, which is under the aegis of the American Sephardi Federation.
Holbrooke emphasized the scope of the Jewish exodus from Arab lands and the risk that the story might be lost to posterity.
www.jta.org /story.asp?id=021001-arab   (1106 words)

  
 YouTube - The Nakba of Arabic Jews
The Jewish exodus from Arab lands refers to the 20th century expulsion or mass departure of Jews, primarily of Sephardi and Mizrahi background, from Arab and Islamic countries.
Some claim that the Jewish exodus from Arab lands is a historical parallel to the Palestinian exodus during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, while others reject this comparison as simplistic.
One Palestinian sociologist has commented that the loss of Jewish property in Arab lands fulfills the conditions of a sulha, or reconciliation, since Jews as well as Palestinians have experienced a catastrophe, and that publicizing this knowledge would pave the way to a true peace process.
www.youtube.com /watch?v=dxKcFo_h5Eg&feature=related   (946 words)

  
 JIMENA Books and Articles
The film illuminates a complex and sensitive period of Jewish life in Iraq when Jews felt their security threatened as antisemitism surfaced with the growth of Zionism.
She uses the Pesach seder, which tells the story of the Hebrew's exodus from Egypt, as a symbol of her grandmother's exodus from modern Egypt.
The Jewish community on this island sees itself as the remnant of an earlier congregation, and it claims to have the “Ghriba” stones from the Temple.
www.jimena.org /Books_Articles.htm   (2674 words)

  
 1967 War - impact on Jews in Arab countries
The defeat of the Arabs by Israel in the war of 1967 led to another frightening reign of terror against the Jews.
Jewish migration from Lebanon, which accelerated in 1964, reached epidemic proportions after the 1967 war due to fears of impending riots.
By 1971, the Jewish population was down to 35,000; however, most of this wave of middle class emigration went to France and North America rather than Israel.
www.sixdaywar.co.uk /jews_in_arab_countries_intro.htm   (1431 words)

  
 Walid Shoebat - Former PLO Terrorist who speaks out for Israel
The Israeli Arab Conflict is not about geography but about Jew hatred; Throughout the Islamic as well as Christendom's history Jews have been persecuted, the persecution of Israel is just the same as the old antisemitism.
The Arab refugees are being used as pawns' to create a terror breeding ground, as a form of aggression against Israel.
Jews who fled Arab persecution from 1948 to 1956 should have no right of return to Arab lands, and Arabs who ran away in 1948 and 1967 should have no right of return either.
www.shoebat.com   (361 words)

  
 Arab: Encyclopedia II - Arab - Who is an Arab?
The definition of who an Arab is has several aspects: Ethnic identity: someone who considers himself to be an Arab (regardless of racial or ethnic origin) and is recognized as such by others.
Not many people consider themselves Arab on the basis of the political definition without the linguistic one—thus, Kurds or Berbers do not usually identify themselves as Arab—but some do (for instance, some Berbers do consider themselves Arabs, and Kurds were in some historical circumstances seen as Arabs or Turks or Persians).
"An Arab is a person whose language is Arabic, who lives in an Arabic speaking country, who is in sympathy with the aspirations of the Arabic speaking peoples." As a number of the Prophet companions were of non-Arab descent, Salman the Persian, Suhaib the Roman and Bilal from Abisinia.
www.experiencefestival.com /a/Arab_-_Who_is_an_Arab/id/610523   (779 words)

  
 Jewish ... Arab lands - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Arab lands - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Arab-Israeli Conflict, conflict between Arabs and Jews in the Middle East over the land of historic Israel and Palestine.
Ben-Gurion's many literary works include Israel: A Personal History (1970) and The Jews in Their Land (1974).
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/search.aspx?q=Jewish+...+Arab+lands   (100 words)

  
 Essential Reading
Compelling discussion of the pogroms and expulsion of 850,000 Jews from Arab North Africa and the Middle East between 1941 and 1976.
Examines brutal persecution of Jews in Arab countries, particularly on the eve of the establishment of the State of Israel.
Discards conventional explanations of anti-Semitism to argue that its root causes are, paradoxically, the very convictions that have ensured Jewish survival: the Jewish conceptions of God, law, and peoplehood.
www.honestreporting.com /a/reading.asp   (804 words)

  
 Jewish exodus from Arab lands - Mideast Youth - Thinking Ahead
How voluntary, if at all this exodus was varies greatly from country to country.
You can see Jewish men wearing yarmulkes in Iran (especially in Esfahan) — it is not a secret.
Even so, Jews walk on eggshells in Iran: they are very careful to maintain their place in society and not demand too much.
www.mideastyouth.com /?p=296   (416 words)

  
 Jews of Yemen
In 1922, the government of Yemen reintroduced an ancient Islamic law requiring that Jewish orphans under age 12 be forcibly converted to Islam.
This increasingly perilous situation led to the emigration of virtually the entire Yemenite Jewish community - almost 50,000 - between June 1949 and September 1950 in Operation "Magic Carpet." A smaller, continuous migration was allowed to continue into 1962, when a civil war put an abrupt halt to any further Jewish exodus.
For a short time, Jewish organizations were allowed to travel openly within Yemen, distributing Hebrew books and materials to the Jewish community.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/anti-semitism/yemenjews.html   (719 words)

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