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Topic: Jocelyn Burnell


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  WowEssays.com - Jocelyn (Susan) Bell Burnell
Jocelyn (Susan)Bell Burnell An important woman in the contribution of science is Jocelyn Bell Burnell.
Jocelyn was born in 1943 in Belfast, Northern Ireland.
Jocelyn began her studies by conducting experiments of gamma-ray astronomy at the University of Southampton.
www.wowessays.com /dbase/aa4/dli169.shtml   (490 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Susan Jocelyn Bell was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland on July 15, 1943.
Jocelyn Bell's parents very strongly believed in educating women.
Jocelyn Bell received her Ph.D. in radio astronomy from Cambridge University in 1968.
starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov /docs/StarChild/whos_who_level2/bell.html   (588 words)

  
  Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell FRS - Spectrum of astronomy
Jocelyn Bell Burnell was made a Fellow of the Royal Society for her considerable contributions to astronomy including her role in the discovery of pulsars whilst still a post graduate student at Cambridge.
Jocelyn Bell Burnells involvement with the discovery during her Ph.D. work in Cambridge in 1968 was the start of a series of contributions to new astrophysics and space science across the electromagnetic spectrum in what she describes as her "portfolio career".
Jocelyn was the only women in her physics undergraduate class at Glasgow University in the early 1960s.
www.royalsoc.ac.uk /page.asp?id=1481   (711 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell speaks at Arecibo
Jocelyn Bell Burnell speaks at Arecibo June 27 on pulsars, the process of discovery and being a female scientist in the 1960s.
Forty years later, Bell Burnell (she married soon after receiving her Ph.D.), a visiting professor at the University of Oxford, is known for her 1967 discovery of pulsars: the key to understanding such fundamental forces as gravity and the strong nuclear force.
She spoke June 27 on "Reflections on the Discovery of Pulsars" at Cornell's Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico as the 2006 William E. and Elva F. Gordon Distinguished Lecturer.
www.news.cornell.edu /stories/July06/jocelyn.bell.html   (597 words)

  
 Ask Us A Question   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Jocelyn Bell Burnell, CBE, FRS FRAS (born Susan Jocelyn Bell, 15 July 1943), Northern Irish astrophysicist and Quaker who discovered the first radio pulsars with her thesis advisor Antony Hewish.
Before retiring Bell Burnell was Dean of Science at the University of Bath between 2001 and 2004, and was President of the Royal Astronomical Society between 2002 and 2004.
She is the house patron of Burnell House at Cambridge House Grammar School in Ballymena, Northern Ireland.
www.sanpablocaus.com /topic/Jocelyn_Bell_Burnell   (482 words)

  
 Astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell discovered pulsars, not aliens
Jocelyn Bell Burnell is an astronomer who briefly thought she had actually made contact with extraterrestrial beings.
Burnell was working with advisor Anthony Hewish at the time of the discovery.
Burnell was responsible for the telescope's operation and for studying the data it gathered.
www.post-gazette.com /magazine/20000328kids9.asp   (242 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Susan Jocelyn Bell was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland on July 15, 1943.
It was Jocelyn Bell's job to operate the telescope and to analyze over 120 meters of chart paper produced by the telescope every four days.
Jocelyn Bell received her Ph.D. in radio astronomy from Cambridge University in 1968.
www.geocities.com /djkalie/burnell.html   (382 words)

  
 Stars, Galaxies and the Universe (29:50) Biographies
Jocelyn Bell Burnell was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland on July 15, 1943.
Jocelyn Bell's first two years at Cambridge were spent assisting in the construction of an 81.5-megahertz radio telescope that was to be used to track quasars.
It was Jocelyn Bell's job to operate the telescope and to analyze the chart paper produced by the telescope.
www.physics.uiowa.edu /~hbryce/sgu/bio.html   (4904 words)

  
 Profile on Jocelyn Bell Burnell - Women in Science - British Council - Science   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Contemporary scientists such as Jocelyn Bell Burnell have more in common with Jodie Fosters worldly astronomer in the film Contact.In all her remarkable achievements Jocelyn is an excellent role model in having overcome failing the Northern Ireland equivalent of the eleven-plus school examinations.
While at Cambridge Jocelyn was involved in the discovery of pulsars, a new area of astrophysics, for which her supervisor won a Nobel Prize.
Jocelyn's work in astronomy means that she can occasionally be found on mountain-tops in Hawaii using the UK's infra-red or millimetre waveband telescopes.
www.britishcouncil.org /it/science-testimonials-jocelyn-bell-burnell.htm   (340 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Jocelyn believes that her academic career began when she failed her 11+ exam, a test to determine who would pursue higher education, at eleven years old.
Burnell is currently a professor and chair of physics at the United Kingdom's Open University, a college devoted to giving people second chances to get a good education.
Burnell hopes that her presence at the university will encourage other women to pursue careers in physics.
www.immaculata.edu /bioinformatics/Summer_2001/Students/eharmon/burnell.htm   (718 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell
Lead by Professor Antony Hewish, Cambridge graduate student Jocelyn Bell was surveying the sky for scintillation phenomena due to interplanetary plasma in a certain radio frequency range.(Chiu, p.965) Among the expected random noises, Bell noted a repeating signal.
Jocelyn Bell's discoveries and research initiated one of the major movements in radio astrophysics, and the lack of acknowledgement, and possible future scientific status, is evidence of the hierarchical and gender bias found in science today.
Working as a graduate student at Cambridge University, Jocelyn Bell was the first to discover this amazing phenomenon, but in spite of documentation attesting to her principal role, the credit for the work and discovery went to her professor Antony Hewish in the form of a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1974.
www.mta.ca /faculty/Courses/Physics/1001/Misc/StudentPapers97/Bell.html   (1334 words)

  
 The woman who discovered pulsars: Jocelyn Bell-Burnell
Jocelyn Bell was a graduate student mapping twinkling quasars under the direction of Tony Hewish in 1967 when she came upon unusually regular radio waves.
The precision of the waves being so perfect, she thought that it must be interference of some sort, or perhaps extraterrestrial life signalling from a far off planet.
Jocelyn Bell, under the direction of Tony Hewish, had discovered the first pulsar.
www.physics.uc.edu /~hanson/TEACH/bell.html   (798 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell - Irish Star of Astrophysics | Science.ie
Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born 1943, Belfast) is the astrophysicist who first discovered pulsars - rapidly rotating neutron stars that release regular bursts of radiowaves.
Burnell was awarded the prestigious Michelson Award with her former graduate advisor Anthony Hewish in 1973.
Today Jocelyn Bell Burnell is still working on the advancement of astronomy and is presently Professor of Physics and Department Chair at the Open University, England.
www.science.ie /EN/index.cfm/section/sitePages/page/burnell   (266 words)

  
 Scientist of the Month
Jocelyn couldn't find any faults or a source of interference and over a few weeks was able to see that the source of the strange signal was moving across the sky at the same rate as the stars - in fact it must be as far away as the stars.
Jocelyn's first pulsar was a neutron star just fifteen kilometres in diameter, and giving off radio waves in a beam as it rotated like a lighthouse lamp.
Jocelyn was a highly respected astronomer even though she was only working part time.
www.longman.co.uk /tt_secsci/resources/scimon/jan_01/bell.htm   (859 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Biography
Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born Jocelyn Bell, 15 July 1943), British astrophysicist who discovered the first radio pulsars with her thesis advisor Antony Hewish.
After finishing her PhD, Burnell worked at the University of Southampton and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, before becoming Professor of Physics at the Open University for ten years, and then a visiting professor at Princeton University.
Burnell has been Dean of Science at the University of Bath since 2001, and was President of the Royal Astronomical Society between 2002 and 2004.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Bell_Jocelyn.html   (284 words)

  
 Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Jocelyn Burnell Bell had made the most remarkable astronomical discovery in recent history; she had detected the first known pulsar, a rapidly spinning neutron star that sends out regular burst of radio waves and other electromagnetic radiation.
Jocelyn was married in 1968 and had a son and was married several years but has subsequently divorced.
Today Jocelyn concerns and efforts are directed towards the advancement of astronomy and she is deeply involved in the teaching and public understanding of physics and astronomy.
www.csupomona.edu /~nova/scientists/articles/burn.html   (1525 words)

  
 tags --> University of Bath - Public Relations - Press releases</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The research student was <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell, and she had just made the most remarkable astronomical discovery in recent history. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>"Jocelyn</b> was born in Belfast, where she started her academic career by failing her 11-plus examinations, a reminder to all that examinations are not an infallible guide. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> She was awarded the Edinburgh Medal for services to science and society, a CBE in 1999, she was the first recipient of the Tinsley Prize of the American Astronomical Society and earlier this year was elected a Fellow of the <a href="/topics/Royal-Society" title="Royal Society" class=fl>Royal Society</a>.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.bath.ac.uk /pr/releases/bellburnell-oration</font>   (605 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://star.arm.ac.uk/publicevents/Robinson-Lecture-2004.html">Robinson Lecture Jocelyn Bell Burnell</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The Robinson Lecture is held biennially in memory of the founder of the Armagh Observatory, Archbishop Richard Robinson. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Jocelyn</b> held the post of Professor of Physics at the Open University from 1991 until 1999 and was subsequently Dean of Science at the University of Bath until September 2004. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Professor <a href="/topics/Antony-Hewish" title="Antony Hewish" class=fl>Antony Hewish</a>, <b>Jocelyn's</b> Ph.D. supervisor, received a half share in the 1974 <a href="/topics/Nobel-Prize" title="Nobel Prize" class=fl>Nobel Prize</a> for Physics for his role in the discovery of <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a>.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>star.arm.ac.uk /publicevents/Robinson-Lecture-2004.html</font>   (486 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>Gale Schools - Women's History Month - Biographies - Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Susan <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell (<b>Burnell</b>) was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on July 15, <a href="/topics/1943" title="1943" class=fl>1943</a>. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b> held a Science Research Council fellowship from 1968 to 1970 and a junior teaching fellowship from 1970 to 1973 at the University of Southampton. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> During that time she studied the mid-latitude electron density trough in the topside ionosphere using data from the Alouette satellite, the enhancements of interplanetary scintillation, and their relationship to co-rotating streams in the interplanetary medium and to Forbush decreases.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.galeschools.com /womens_history/bio/bellburnell_s.htm</font>   (1145 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>Gale - Free Resources - Women's History - Biographies - Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Susan <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell (<b>Burnell</b>) was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on July 15, <a href="/topics/1943" title="1943" class=fl>1943</a>. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b> held a Science Research Council fellowship from 1968 to 1970 and a junior teaching fellowship from 1970 to 1973 at the University of Southampton. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> During that time she studied the mid-latitude electron density trough in the topside ionosphere using data from the Alouette satellite, the enhancements of interplanetary scintillation, and their relationship to co-rotating streams in the interplanetary medium and to Forbush decreases.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>gale.cengage.com /free_resources/whm/bio/bellburnell_s.htm</font>   (1150 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>candace: jocelyn bell burnell</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> While working on her Ph.D. at <a href="/topics/Cambridge-University" title="Cambridge University" class=fl>Cambridge University</a>, <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell <b>Burnell</b> found herself helping to build a new radio telescope called the Interplanetary Scintillation Array which was being built from 120 miles of wire covering over 4 acres. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Jocelyn's</b> <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsar</a> is called PSR1919+21, and an image of its radio pulses was used on the cover of Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures album. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Jocelyn</b> has also been loaded down with lots of honours, including numerous honorary degrees, and is a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and a Fellow of the <a href="/topics/Royal-Society" title="Royal Society" class=fl>Royal Society</a>.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>epistolary.net /archives/000280.html</font>   (1399 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>Princeton - PWB 120699 - Physics for all mind-sets</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Anyone meeting with <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell <b>Burnell</b>, Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching, is apt to learn something about her special area of expertise --<a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl> pulsars </a>-- even if they were just stopping by for a chat. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b>, who is chair of the physics department at the Open University, Great Britain's largest university, is teaching at Princeton for a year. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b> still corresponds by e-mail with elementary and high school students who have sought her out for projects on women in science.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.princeton.edu /pr/pwb/99/1206/physics.shtml</font>   (948 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.physics.ucla.edu/~cwp/Phase2/Burnell,_Jocelyn_Bell@841234567.html">CWP at physics.UCLA.edu // Bell Burnell</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Although <b>Burnell</b> shared the prestigious Michelson Award with her former graduate advisor Hewish in 1973, the Nobel Committee the following year did not acknowledge her role in the discovery of <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a> when it awarded Sir Martin Ryle and Anthony Hewish the 1974 <a href="/topics/Nobel-Prize" title="Nobel Prize" class=fl>Nobel Prize</a> in Physics "for their pioneering research in radio astrophysics. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Burnell</b> reports that her career was shaped in a large part by her husband's frequent relocations and the birth of a son. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> When <b>Burnell</b> was appointed Professor of Physics at the Open University in Milton Keynes, the number of female professors of physics in the United Kingdom doubled.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.physics.ucla.edu /~cwp/Phase2/Burnell,_Jocelyn_Bell@841234567.html</font>   (756 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.hypatiamaze.org/j_bell/pulsar.html">Making Contact with Pulsars</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> No, but the first part of the story is so similar to the real life story of <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell who discovered <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a> in 1967, some of the opening scenes from the movie could have been taken from the TV documentary about Bell. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> She founded the school's archaeology club and organized digs; she was stage manager in a number of school drama productions, and she was the captain of the hockey team. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> For example, <b>Jocelyn</b> Bell at the time of her discovery was probed by the press with questions like: was she taller than Princess Margaret and how many boyfriends did she have at a time?</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.hypatiamaze.org /j_bell/pulsar.html</font>   (1444 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.physics.princeton.edu/www/jh/news/news_bell_burnell.html">Jocelyn Bell-Burnell: Visiting Distinguished Teacher, Department of Physiccs, Princeton University</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b>, currently a visiting fellow in the Physics Department, earned her BSc in 1965 at the University of Glasgow and her PhD at <a href="/topics/Cambridge-University" title="Cambridge University" class=fl>Cambridge University</a> in 1968. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b> has taught at the University of Southampton, been on the staff of the Mullard Space Science Lab at the University of London and held a management post at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Her research interests are in astrophysics, and, she says, "astronomical examples tend to find their way into my courses." Within astrophysics, her interests are "the <a href="/topics/Neutron-star" title="Neutron star" class=fl>neutron stars</a> or <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a> that I discovered as a grad student." She has been associated this year with Princeton's <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsar</a> group.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.physics.princeton.edu /www/jh/news/news_bell_burnell.html</font>   (367 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/B/Bell_Burnell.html">Bell Burnell, (Susan) Jocelyn (1943-)</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> A British observational astronomer known for her discovery of <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a>, for which her graduate advisor, Anthony Hewish, won the 1974 <a href="/topics/Nobel-Prize" title="Nobel Prize" class=fl>Nobel Prize</a> (with Martin Ryle). </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Born in Belfast (her father was architect of the Armagh Observatory) and educated at York, Glasgow, and Cambridge, Bell (later <b>Burnell</b>) used a radio telescope at Cambridge that she helped build to detect a rapid set of pulses occurring at regular intervals. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Although <b>Burnell</b> shared the prestigious Michelson Award with Hewish in 1973, the Nobel Committee did not acknowledge her role in the discovery of <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsars</a> when it awarded Ryle and Hewish the 1974 <a href="/topics/Nobel-Prize" title="Nobel Prize" class=fl>Nobel prize</a> in physics “for their pioneering research in radio astrophysics.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/B/Bell_Burnell.html</font>   (292 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>UNC News release -- Astronomer to discuss pulsars, her career in science in two lectures</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell</b> will give two free public lectures to the Carolina community, the first focusing on her life as a scientist and the second focusing on <a href="/topics/Pulsar" title="Pulsar" class=fl>pulsar</a> research. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> A native of Northern Ireland, Bell <b>Burnell</b> is a visiting professor in astrophysics at the University of Oxford and a fellow of the <a href="/topics/Royal-Society" title="Royal Society" class=fl>Royal Society</a> and National Academy of Sciences. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Bell <b>Burnell’s</b> visit is sponsored by UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences, the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, the department of physics and astronomy, the Curriculum in Women’s Studies and the Charles M. and Shirley F. Weiss Endowment Fund for Women’s Studies.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.unc.edu /news/archives/oct05/bellburnell101305.htm</font>   (433 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><script language="JavaScript"> <!-- // This function displays the ad results. // It must be defined above the script that calls show_ads.js // to guarantee that it is defined when show_ads.js makes the call-back. function google_ad_request_done(google_ads) { // Proceed only if we have ads to display! if (google_ads.length < 1 ) return; var s = ''; // For text ads, display each ad in turn. // In this example, each ad goes in a new row in the table. if (google_ads[0].type == 'text') { for(i = 0; i < 1; ++i) { s = '<body face="Arial"><br><table cellpadding=0><tr><td>  </td><td><table ><tr><td> </td><td colspan=2>' + '<a href="' + google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '">' + google_ads[i].line1 + '</a>  <span style="font-size:10pt">'; if (google_info.feedback_url) { s += '<a href="' + google_info.feedback_url + '" style="color:#7070F0;text-decoration:none">(Ads by Google)</a>'; 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