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Topic: Jodrell Bank


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  BBC ON THIS DAY | 14 | 1960: Radio telescope makes space history
Jodrell first made contact with Pioneer V after it went into orbit around the Sun, between the paths of Earth and Venus.
Shortly after launch, the Jodrell Bank telescope was used for the first time to give commands to a rocket in space.
By pressing a button at Jodrell Bank, the 90lb (43kg) payload was separated from the third stage of the launching rocket.
news.bbc.co.uk /onthisday/hi/dates/stories/march/14/newsid_2566000/2566961.stm   (434 words)

  
  Jodrell Bank - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jodrell Bank was the only installation in the world able to track Sputnik's booster rocket by radar, and the fame and income this brought in enabled the considerable construction debts to be paid off.
In February 1966, Jodrell Bank tracked the USSR unmanned moon lander Luna 9 and listened in on its facsimile transmission of photographs from the moon's surface.
Jodrell Bank Observatory is also the base of the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN), a National Facility run by the University of Manchester on behalf of PPARC.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jodrell_Bank   (1324 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank
The Jodrell Bank Observatory, near Macclesfield, Cheshire in the north west of England is a part of the University of Manchester.
In 1987, on its 30th anniversary, the telescope was renamed the Lovell Telescope in Sir Bernard's honour.
A second radio telescope, the Mark II, was built at Jodrell Bank in 1964, with a diameter of approximately 25 metres (it's parabolic, not circular), while a third telescope, the Mark III, located some 20 miles away near Nantwich is part of the Jodrell Bank Observatory.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/jo/Jodrell_Bank.html   (216 words)

  
 Guardian Unlimited | Life | The radio star
Since the first giant radio telescope was constructed in the University of Manchester's botanical gardens at Jodrell Bank in 1947, the people of Macclesfield and the surrounding towns and villages have been justifiably proud of the landmark on their doorstep.
Jodrell Bank's astronomers have watched nearby galaxies give birth to stars and identified bizarre sounding celestial objects such as quasars and gravitational lenses.
Ian Halliday, the chief executive of PPARC (and nearly the man who closed Jodrell Bank), is reluctant to dwell on how much the history and prestige of the observatory influenced past decisions over its fate, but he is happy to talk about how they could be harnessed in the future.
www.guardian.co.uk /life/feature/story/0,13026,1229666,00.html   (1946 words)

  
 BNSC - Jodrell Bank
It is the flagship of the Jodrell Bank Observatory, part of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester.
Jodrell Bank is a place of learning, teaching and research for the University's engineers, astronomers and students.
Lovell and his colleagues turned their attention to outer space and an early telescope at Jodrell Bank was the first to discover radio waves coming from the Andromeda galaxy.
www.bnsc.gov.uk /learningzone.aspx?nid=4706   (330 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Jodrell Bank Observatory (Astronomical Observatories) - Encyclopedia
Jodrell Bank Observatory[jOd´rul] Pronunciation Key, observatory for radio astronomy located at Jodrell Bank, Macclesfield, Cheshire, England.
Originally known as the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, it was officially the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories from 1966 to 1999.
The principal instrument is one of the world's largest fully steerable radio antennas, the Lovell Telescope, with an altazimuth-mounted parabolic dish 250 ft (76 m) in diameter.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/J/JodrellB.html   (259 words)

  
 From Copernicus to Jodrell Bank
There are very few members of the British public who have not heard of Jodrell Bank and there remains in the minds of many an exciting association between Jodrell Bank, satellites and manned discoveries in Space.
Jodrell Bank is situated in rural Cheshire, near MacClesfield where the Radio Telescope dominates the skyline.
The main purpose of the radio telescopes at Jodrell Bank (and an associated array elsewhere in England and Wales) is to pursue serious scientific research into the nature of the Universe, and owes its existence to the vision of one man - Sir Bernard Lovell.
www.asss.utvinternet.com /articles2/fromcopernicusto.htm   (1084 words)

  
 MERLIN : How it works.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
As well as ensuring that all the telescopes are working correctly and locked on to the required source position, the computers monitor the weather, the security of the site, and generally keep a watch over the telescopes in their charge.
Jodrell Bank astronomres have had to devise new computation techniques to handle data from this "unfilled aperture" and generate high quality images.
Jodrell Bank is fortunate in having access to the SERC Starlink network of astronomical computers, but the MERLIN workload is so high that a more powerful, dedicated machine is necessary.
www.merlin.ac.uk /about/layman/works.html   (527 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank radio telescope   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The 250-ft (76-m) dish at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire, was the world’s first large radio telescope.
The unmistakable structure of the Jodrell Bank dish appeared on this stamp from a Hungarian set issued in 1965 to mark the International Years of the Quiet Sun (IQSY), a follow-up to the International Geophysical Year.
Ascension, an island in the South Atlantic, included the Jodrell Bank dish in a set depicting the evolution of space travel, although this illustration seems to confuse its role in radio astronomy with that of satellite tracking and communications.
www.ianridpath.com /stamps/jodrell.htm   (391 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank Arboretum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Jodrell Bank Arboretum is an arboretum at Jodrell Bank near Macclesfield, Cheshire in the north west of England.
There are 2,500 varieties of tree and shrub, including National Collections of crab apple Malus and mountain ash Sorbus.
Jodrell Bank Arboretum - information on garden history
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jodrell_Bank_Arboretum   (109 words)

  
 chapter 3
Jodrell Bank astronomers argued that they had demonstrated closed orbits for meteors that did not form part of showers, and they concluded that all meteors form part of the solar system.
At Jodrell Bank, William Murray, supported by a DSIR student fellowship, and J.K. Hargreaves began their study of lunar echoes in connection with a meteor research team led by Tom Kaiser.
Lunar echo research at Jodrell Bank now became the work of John V. Evans, who arrived as a postgraduate student in 1954 and whose supervisor was Ian C. Browne, a colleague of Tom Kaiser working on radar echoes from meteors.
history.nasa.gov /SP-4217/ch3.htm   (6281 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank Observatory
Jodrell Bank Observatory is part of the School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Manchester.
Astronomers based at Jodrell Bank Observatory have found evidence that giant whirlpools form in the wake of stars as they move through clouds in interstellar space.
Jodrell Bank Observatory scientists and engineers have contributed some of the key receivers that are now being incorporated.
www.jb.man.ac.uk   (632 words)

  
 Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | Rumors of Jodrell Bank's demise greatly exaggerated
Meanwhile, Jodrell Bank and MERLIN continue to probe the frontiers of the Universe.
It is operated by the University of Manchester on behalf of PPARC and is the radio astronomy cornerstone of the United Kingdom's astronomy programme.
MERLIN is a network of 7 telescopes distributed over central England; several at and near Jodrell Bank in Cheshire, one at Knockin near the Welsh border, one at Defford in Worcestershire and the newest located just outside Cambridge.
spaceflightnow.com /news/n0007/19jodrell   (1126 words)

  
 JRULM: Special Collections Guide: Jodrell Bank Archive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Papers relating to the Jodrell Bank Radio Telescope, deposited by Sir Bernard Lovell (b 1913), Professor of Radio Astronomy at Manchester University and Director of Jodrell Bank, 1951-1980.
The first radar transmitter and receiver was installed by Lovell at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire, in December 1945.
For further information on the history of Jodrell Bank, technical details about the telescopes, and news of current research activities, visit the Jodrell Bank website.
rylibweb.man.ac.uk /data2/spcoll/jodrellb   (311 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank Observatory
It is the flagship of the Jodrell Bank Observatory which is part of the School of Physics and Astronomy of The University of Manchester.
Jodrell Bank is also a place of wonder and inspiration for the many people who visit our Visitor Centre each year.
There is a history of the developments at Jodrell Bank and those taking place today.
www.jodrellbank.manchester.ac.uk /generalpublic   (456 words)

  
 Holmes Chapel - Jodrell Bank
JODRELL BANK, near Holmes Chapel in Cheshire, is just the place to find out all you ever wanted to know about the planets and all the rest of outer space.
Jodrell Bank can trace its origins back to 1945 when Bernard Lovell came to Manchester University to observe cosmic rays.
In those days, Jodrell Bank was the university's little-known botanical station, but today, it is one of the world's leading radio-astronomy facilities.
www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk /entertainment/daysout/s/24/24878_holmes_chapel__jodrell_bank.html   (204 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Jodrell Bank Science Centre and Arboretum in Cheshire was visited by yours truly on Saturday, 4th May.
The radio telescope, now known as the Lovell Telescope, was bathed in glorious sunshine as we drove towards it from the camp site at Mobberly (south of Manchester).
The show seemed to be aimed at the less well informed (perhaps the children) and the quality of the photographs projected onto the dome was poor.
homepage.ntlworld.com /brian.kilby/astro/1996/may/jodrell.html   (519 words)

  
 Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | Looking inside a neutron star
The world-famous Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, University of Manchester, has discovered a pulsar that is wobbling, giving astronomers a glimpse into the interior of a neutron star.
The Jodrell Bank scientists (Ingrid Stairs, Andrew Lyne and Setnam Shemar) have been studying 13 years' worth of data from the pulsar PSR B1828-11.
The described research is funded by PPARC and carried out by the pulsar research group of the Jodrell Bank Observatory which forms part of the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Manchester.
spaceflightnow.com /news/n0008/02neutroninside   (920 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank astronomers find new type of star | SpaceRef - Your Space Reference
Astronomers of the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory (UK) have led an international team which used the Parkes radio telescope in Australia to find a new kind of cosmic object which sends out radio flashes.
The powerful "multibeam" receiver was built as a joint venture between engineers at the Australia Telescope National Facility and the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory.
The Jodrell Bank work was supported by funding from the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC).
www.spaceref.com /news/viewpr.html?pid=19085   (1133 words)

  
 Space Today Online - Deep Space Astronomy -- Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank
The 250-ft. Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory
Lovell Telescope, the flagship of Jodrell Bank Observatory, stands on the Cheshire Plain in the United Kingdom — part of the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Manchester.
The Jodrell Bank Observatory's radiotelescopes, used for teaching and research by students, astronomers and engineers, work in coordination with X-ray, optical, infrared and millimetre-wave telescopes around the world.
www.spacetoday.org /DeepSpace/Telescopes/LovellTelescopeJBO.html   (248 words)

  
 Jodrell Bank-Looking forward to a bright future by Dr Ian Morison   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Dr Morison began with a fascinating account of the early years of Jodrell Bank that began shortly after WWII when Dr Bernard Lovell was obliged to set up an ex-army radar unit in a muddy field in Cheshire, to escape radio interference from Manchester trams, in his cosmic ray research.
Nevertheless, the discovery rate at Jodrell has been immense, particularly of pulsars, the rapidly rotating cores of collapsed stars that 'tick' like clocks at radio wavelengths.
Five years ago Jodrell Bank was in financial difficulties.
www.mikeoates.org /mas/history/lectures/20020919.htm   (372 words)

  
 Lovell Telescope  - Telescope Dude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The upgraded giant radio dish at the uk's jodrell bank observatory is officially opened by the prince of wales.
Sto covers space from earth to the edge of the universe lovell telescope, the flagship of jodrell bank observatory, stands on the cheshire plain in the united kingdom when the lovell telescope was built in 1957, it was expected to
Twenty years ago, engineers in charge of the lovell telescope at jodrell bank were having measurement problems as the lovell telescope rotates on a central shaft diameter of 1.
www.telescopedude.com /info/LovellTelescope   (1325 words)

  
 Field Report from Jodrell Bank, England - SETI Institute   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Unlike Arecibo, Jodrell Bank is completely above ground level and dominates the Cheshire landscape for miles around.
The first I heard of Jodrell Bank was in the beginning of the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
While the view from the top of the green hills and farms of Cheshire is beautiful, the view of the inside is magnificent, lots of dust and grease and larger than life machinery.
www.seti.org /site/pp.asp?c=ktJ2J9MMIsE&b=260269   (476 words)

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