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Topic: John Bell Hood


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  John Bell Hood: Biography - Ancestry
John Bell's mother, Theodosia French, was the daughter of James French and Keziah Callaway.
John W., along with brothers William and Andrew, would forgo the military bent of their father, and turn to the study and practice of medicine in the small Clark County, Kentucky town of Winchester.
Luykas Andrieszen (John Bell Hood's great X 3 grandfather) was the son of Andries Luykaszen (Hood's great X 4 grandfather) and Jennetje Sebyns, and both father and son are both identified frequently as "Skipper" or "Captain" in numerous court, church, marine and civil records of the early Dutch colony.
johnbellhood.org /bio-01.htm   (867 words)

  
  John Bell Hood - LoveToKnow 1911
JOHN BELL HOOD (1831-1879), American soldier, lieut.- general of the Confederate army, was born at Owingsville, Kentucky, in 1831, and graduated from West Point military academy in 1853.
A severe battle was fought at Franklin on the 30th of November, and finally Hood was defeated and his army almost annihilated in the battle of Nashville.
Hood's reputation as a bold and energetic leader was well deserved, though his reckless vigour proved but a poor substitute for Johnston's careful husbanding of his strength at this declining stage of the Confederacy.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /John_Bell_Hood   (451 words)

  
 John Bell Hood: Biography - Early Years
John Bell Hood was born on June 29, 1831, in Owingsville (Bath County), Kentucky, a son of Dr. John and Theodosia French Hood.
John Bell and his siblings were left with their mother for approximately eight months each year during the middle and late 1840’s during Dr. Hood’s annual visits to Philadelphia, where he taught medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
John Bell was urged by his father to take up the study of medicine, and was even offered an opportunity to study in Europe.
johnbellhood.org /bio-02.htm   (366 words)

  
 John Bell Hood - biography
John Bell Hood was born on June 29, 1831, in Owingsville, Kentucky.
Hood was wounded early on in the Battle of Gettysburg and permanently lost the use of his left arm.
Hood's style of fighting was to charge the enemy head-on, which sometimes was described as courageous or fearless and other times drew criticism as being reckless.On February 4, 1864 he became Commander of the Army of Tennessee.
www.texas-brigade.com /jbh.htm   (1016 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - John Bell Hood
John Bell Hood (June 1, 1831–August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War.
Hood had a reputation for bravery and aggressiveness since he was one of the few generals to personally lead his soldiers into combat.
Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky and was educated at the United States Military Academy; he graduated in 1853 ranked 44th out of 52.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/John_Bell_Hood   (488 words)

  
 John Bell Hood
Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky, and was the; son of John W. Hood, a doctor and Theodosia French Hood.
Hood became the brigade commander of the unit that was henceforth known as Hood's Texas Brigade on February 20, 1862, part of the Confederate Army of the Potomac, and was promoted to brigadier general on March 3, 1862.
John M. Schofield at Spring Hill, Tennessee, on November 29, the next day at the Battle of Franklin his troops were unsuccessful in their attempt to breach the Union breastworks and they allowed the Union force to withdraw unimpeded toward Nashville.
john-bell-hood.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/John_Bell_Hood   (3038 words)

  
 John B. Hood Biography
John Bell Hood was a likeable person- tall and handsome with piercing blue eyes, with long, sandy blonde hair, and possessing a strong, booming voice.
Hood graduated 44 out of 52 in the class of 1853, and was sent to an infantry post in California before his transfer to the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, which he joined in Texas.
Hood's division avoided heavy fighting at the Battle of Fredericksburg, after which his division was ordered to Suffolk, Virginia, where they collected supplies for the army and sparred with a Union force which occupied the city.
www.nps.gov /gett/getttour/tstops/tstd2-09jbh.htm   (1074 words)

  
 Wikinfo | John Bell Hood   (Site not responding. Last check: )
John Bell Hood (June 1, 1831—August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War.
Hood had a reputation for bravery and aggressiveness since he was one of the few generals to personally lead his soldiers into combat.
Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky and was educated at the United States Military Academy; he graduated in 1853 ranked 44th out of 52.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=John_Bell_Hood   (400 words)

  
 John Bell Hood, Confederate General at Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Atlanta Campaign, Nashville Campaign
Born the son of a rural doctor in Owingsville, Kentucky, John Bell Hood was raised in the bluegrass region of central Kentucky near the town of Mt. Sterling.
Hood was so severely wounded that his amputated leg was sent with him so that it could be buried with the him in the result of his death.
Hood developed a close personal relationship with fellow Kentuckian, President Jefferson Davis while recovering from his Chickamauga wound in Richmond during the winter of 1863-1864.
www.ngeorgia.com /people/hood.html   (2255 words)

  
 JOHN BELL HOOD, CSA
John Bell Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky, on June 1, 1831.
Hood was promoted to lieutenant general on February 1, 1864, to rank from the Battle of Chickamauga, he commanded a corps in the Atlanta Campaign.
Hood's friends arranged for his war memoirs to be published, and the proceeds were used to provide for Hood's orphaned children.
www.multied.com /Bio/CWcGENS/CSAHood.html   (639 words)

  
 John Bell Hood - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Bell, John (1797-1869), American statesman, born near Nashville, Tennessee, and educated at Cumberland College.
John Bell Hood was a brilliant tactician who reached his nadir when promoted to command of the Army...
John Bell Hood (June 1 or June 29, 1831 August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War.
ca.encarta.msn.com /John_Bell_Hood.html   (198 words)

  
 John Bell Hood information - Search.com
Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky, son of John W. Hood, a doctor, and Theodosia French Hood.
Hood was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 4th U.S. Infantry, served in California, and later transferred to the 2nd U.S. Cavalry in Texas, where he was commanded by Colonel Robert E. Lee.
John Bell Hood is buried in the Hennen family tomb at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/John_Bell_Hood   (2208 words)

  
 John Bell Hood
John Bell Hood was born on June 1, 1831.
Hood was appointed Lt. General and commander of the Army of Tennessee after the position was vacated by General Joseph E. Johnston in 1864.
Hood's army was thoroughly destroyed by Union forces in Tennessee and he asked to be relieved of his command in January 1865.
www.navarrocollege.edu /library/civilwar/finding_aids/g_l/hood.htm   (342 words)

  
 American History - Hood's Texas Brigade
John Bell Hood was born June 29, 1831 in Bath County Kentucky.
Hood proved himself a true leader and was promoted to Lt. General in the Army of Northern Virginia.
General Longstreet made the statement that Hood was responsible for the loss of the war and Hood, who had kept a journal on his army activities made a rebuttal to Longstreet.
www.electricscotland.com /history/america/hood.htm   (915 words)

  
 JOHN BELL HOOD   (Site not responding. Last check: )
John Bell Hood, born in Owingsville, Kentucky, June 1, 1831, and graduated from West Point in the class of 1853 had by all odds the most spectacular advance in rank of any officer in the Confederate service.
Hoods corps was composed of the divisions of Hindman, C L Stevenson, and A P Stewart, Army of Tennessee.
Hood was then relieved at his own request in January 1865 and reverted to his permanent rank of lieutenant general.
www.b17.com /mosb/generals/hood.htm   (348 words)

  
 Gen. John Bell Hood's Invasion of Tennessee
Hood now found himself in the unenviable position of attempting to shadow Sherman, trying to bring him into a pitched battle with of hope of defeating him, or Hood could strike what he thought would be a death blow to the Union by invading Tennessee.
Hood's plan was to have Cheatham's corps and the Headquarters move north on the Waynesboro-Florence Road to Waynesboro and then on the old Columbia Central Turnpike to Mt. Pleasant.
Hood was a defeated man and submitted his resignation, the army was placed under the immediate command of Gen. Richard Taylor, later joining Gen. Joe Johnston for the denouement of the war.
www.netease.net /wayne/Hood.htm   (1710 words)

  
 John Bell Hood: Biography - U.S. Army Career
Hood was promoted to second lieutenant of cavalry, and reported to Col. Johnston at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis, Missouri in October 1855.
Hood, impressed with his youngest son, made John Bell sole power of attorney for the elder Hood's affairs, and instructed John Bell in the disposition of his assets.
Hood's first combat occurred when he was assigned by Major George Thomas to conduct a scouting and raiding expedition against the Indians, departing Fort Mason on July 5, 1857 with 25 troopers and an Indian guide.
johnbellhood.org /bio-04.htm   (741 words)

  
 Handbook of Texas Online:
John Bell Hood, United States and Confederate States Army officer, was born at Owingsville, Bath County, Kentucky, on June 1, 1831, the son of John W. and Theodocia (French) Hood.
Hood, commanding a reconnaissance patrol from Fort Mason, sustained an arrow wound to the left hand in action against the Comanches near the headwaters of the Devils River on July 20, 1857.
Hood's command spearheaded the Rebel attack that broke the Union line on September 20, but Hood was shot in the upper right thigh, a wound that necessitated the amputation of his leg.
www.tsha.utexas.edu /handbook/online/articles/view/HH/fho49.html   (888 words)

  
 Military.com Content
Hood had graduated from West Point near the bottom of his 1853 class, which included future Union foes James B. McPherson and John Schofield.
Hood lost the use of an arm on the second day at Gettysburg and lost a leg to amputation after the Battle of Chickamauga.
Hood then began to advance through Tennessee, and Schofield slowly withdrew before him, repulsing his attacks at Franklin and at Nashville.
www.military.com /Content/MoreContent?file=ML_jbhood_bkp   (400 words)

  
 John Bell Hood
Born the son of a rural doctor in Owingsville, Kentucky, John Bell Hood was raised in the bluegrass region of central Kentucky near the town of Mt. Sterling.
Hood was so severely wounded that his amputated leg was sent with him so that it could be buried with the him in the result of his death.
During this period Davis advised Hood of his intentions to reinforce General Joseph E. Johnston [CS] at Dalton, Georgia in the spring of 1864, and to move against the Federal army of General William T. Sherman at Chattanooga, Tennessee.
ngeorgia.com /ang/John_Bell_Hood   (2268 words)

  
 John Bell Hood: Biography - West Point
John Bell Hood arrived at West Point during the summer of 1849, and graduated four years later in a class that included Civil War notables James B. McPherson, John M. Schofield and Philip H. Sheridan.
Cadet Hood was cited for "laughing in ranks," "chewing tobacco," "smoking," "hair not cut," "trifling conduct in the philosophical academy," "making unnecessary noise and dancing on the piazza," "late at church," "laughing and inattentive in the ethical academy," and "clothes not neat." Other offenses included numerous instances of a disorderly room in the barracks.
Hood was reduced in rank and received numerous demerits that placed his total at 196, four short of expulsion.
johnbellhood.org /bio-03.htm   (584 words)

  
 JOHN BELL HOOD & THE CURSE OF ANNE MITCHELL
JOHN BELL HOOD and THE CURSE OF ANNE MITCHELL
Hood was the son of Dr. John W. Hood, who lived near the Mitchell home and who operated a small farm and a medical school for aspiring doctors.
After the outbreak of the war, Hood followed Lee into service for the Confederacy, becoming a commander in the Texas Brigade, an outfit considered to be one of the toughest in the southern army.
www.militaryghosts.com /hood.html   (1698 words)

  
 Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate States Armies by John Bell Hood, ISBN: ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Hood wrote that the reason he didn't wait for the artillery was because he didn't want to risk shelling innocent civilians that lived in Franklin.
Hood is indeed a tragic figure of the Civil War, representing the badly outdated infantry tactics of the era as well as the careless bravery that so many officers possessed.
Hood himself stated that he felt the AOT was weak in the fact that they had become accustomed to the defense of breastworks.
www.campusi.com /isbn_0306805340.htm   (1819 words)

  
 John Bell Hood
John Bell Hood's first military assignment of the Civil War came to him from an old commander - Hood probably thought of him as a friend - Robert E. Lee.
Hood, however, was not out of range of federal gunboats on the York River and these forced him to withdraw.
Hood's first action during the Union retreat was at the Battle of Gaines Mill.
blueandgraytrail.com /event/John_Bell_Hood   (1103 words)

  
 John Bell Hood and the War for Southern Independence
John Bell Hood was blamed for the defeats at Franklin and Nashville of the Army of Tennessee in 1864.
John Bell Hood's early career was marked by good fortune and successes in battle, and ultimately he became the youngest of the eight full generals of the Confederacy.
John Bell was definitely not a loyal subordinate.
www.xmlwriter.net /books/viewbook/John_Bell_Hood_and_the_War_for_Southern_Independence-0803281919.html   (1153 words)

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