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Topic: John Vincent Atanasoff


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In the News (Mon 25 Mar 19)

  
  John Atanasoff
John Atanasoff was a prominent American inventor who took pride in his Bulgarian heritage and maintained strong ties to his ancestral home of Bulgaria.
John Atanasoff's father, Ivan Atanasoff, was born in the village of Boyadjick, Bulgaria.
John Vincent Atanasoff was born in the town of Hamilton, New York on October 4, 1903.
www.johnatanasoff.com /biography.php?sub=basic_facts   (798 words)

  
 Computing People: John Atanasoff
John Vincent Atanasoff, born on 4 October 1903 in Hamilton, New York the first child of John Atanasoff and Iva Lucena Purdy took an early interest in mathematics.
Atanasoff had hoped to pursue a patent for his computer, but with the onset of World War II he was called to Washington to do physics research for the Navy.
John Vincent Atanasoff died 15 June 1995 of a stroke at his home in Monrovia, Md. He was 91 years old, the true inventor of the digital electronic computer.
www.angelfire.com /ma/kilenm/2k03ppl.html   (1176 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff
John Vincent Atanasoff is the first son of John Atanasoff and Iva Lucena Purdy.
John Vincent read the instructions on how to use the slide rule, and he became more interested in the mathematical principles of the slide rule.
John Vincent graduated from the University of Florida in 1925 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering.
ei.cs.vt.edu /~history/do_Atanasoff.html   (1398 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
John Atanasoff (a-ta-NA-soff) was raised in Brewster, Florida, the son of an electrical engineer.
John Atanasoff met John Mauchly at the December 1940 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia, where Mauchly was demonstrating his "harmonic analyzer".
Atanasoff Nunatak peak on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is named for John Vincent Atanasoff.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/John_Vincent_Atanasoff   (1513 words)

  
 DesMoinesRegister.com | Famous Iowans
John Vincent Atanasoff changed the way modern life is lived by building the first electronic digital computer while teaching at Iowa State University.
Atanasoff, one of John and Iva Purdy Atanasoff's eight children, was born in Hamilton, N.Y., and grew up in Florida, where his father, an immigrant from Bulgaria, was an electrical engineer.
Atanasoff, known as "J.V." to his friends, was called to work for the government in Washington, D.C., in World War II and never returned to his teaching post.
desmoinesregister.com /extras/iowans/atanasoff.html   (302 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff (1905 - 1995)
John Atanasoff, a physics professor at Iowa State College, decided - almost against his better judgement - to base his version of a computer on the binary system.
Atanasoff was convinced that the two digit binary system - with its benefit of reducing ten symbols to two in his machine's circuitry - would increase speed and efficiency, but he was concerned that users might be confused by the transition from the familiar decimal system.
The machine designed and built by Atanasoff and a young engineering student, Clifford Berry, by 1942, was capable of solving differential equations using binary math, although it couldn't be programmed and had no central processing unit.
www.kerryr.net /pioneers/atanasoff.htm   (338 words)

  
 John V. Atanasoff: Obituary
The Atanasoff prototype finally was recognized as the father of modern computing when, in a patent infringement case Sperry Rand brought against Honeywell, a federal judge voided Sperry Rand's patent on the ENIAC, saying it had been derived from Dr. Atanasoff's invention.
John Vincent Atanasoff was born in Hamilton, N.Y. He was an electrical engineering graduate of the University of Florida and received a master's degree in mathematics from Iowa State University, where he taught for 15 years.
Atanasoff, whose father was born in Bulgaria, also was awarded Bulgaria's highest science award and was a member of the Bulgarian Academy of Science.
archive.comlab.ox.ac.uk /other/museums/computing/atanasoff.html   (1168 words)

  
 John Atanasoff Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
John Atanasoff (1903-1995) was a pioneer in the field of computer science.
John Vincent Atanasoff was born on October 4, 1903, in Hamilton, New York.
Atanasoff became interested in calculating devices at an early age--he began studying his father's slide rule when he was only nine, and read technical books on mathematics, physics, and chemistry.
www.bookrags.com /biography/john-atanasoff   (782 words)

  
 Biographies
JOHN VINCENT ATANASOFF was born on 4 October 1903 a few miles west of Hamilton, New York.
Atanasoff regarded this machine as having the same flaws as other analog devices, where accuracy was dependent upon the performance of other parts of the machine.
Atanasoff left Ames, Iowa, on leave from Iowa State for a defense-related position at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in Washington, D.C. He left the task of completing the patenting of the ABC to university officials.
www.scl.ameslab.gov /ABC/Biographies.html   (2711 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
John Vincent Atanasoff was born near Hamilton, New York on October the 4th 1903.
John Vincent was the first child John Atanasoff, an electrical engineer, and a mathematic teacher Iva Lucena Purdy.
John Vincent Atanasoff died of a stroke on June the 15th 1995.
www.csulb.edu /~cwallis/wallis/computability/atanasoff.html   (818 words)

  
 Atanasoff: Inventor, Problem-Solver, And Inventor of the Real Computer
John V. Atanasoff, II sees his father's invention as ranking so high in importance that it may not yet be fully understood.
Atanasoff ultimately was recognized as the true father of the electronic digital computer, because -- while he was busy with other things -- a major corporation took another one to court.
Atanasoff built the device in the basement of the university's physics building with the collaboration of graduate student Clifford Berry.
www.intercom.net /local/shore_journal/joc10225.html   (1796 words)

  
 Department of Computer Science: Iowa State University
It was built by John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry at Iowa State University during 1937-42.
Clark Mollenhoff in his book, Atanasoff, Forgotten Father of the Computer, details the design and construction of the Atanasoff-Berry Computer with emphasis on the relationships of the individuals.
In recognition of his achievement, Atanasoff was awarded the National Medal of Technology by President George Bush at the White house on November 13, 1990.
www.cs.iastate.edu /jva/jva-archive.shtml   (260 words)

  
 Intl Symposium To Honor Atanasoff, Computer's Inventor
John Vincent Atanasoff, the father of the digital computer and an ISU alum (MS ’26 mathematics) and former professor, was born 100 years ago on Oct. 4, and Iowa State is celebrating his birthday.
The story of Atanasoff and his invention has begun to take on the polished patina of a cherished legend, but such has not always been the case.
But the lawsuit proved that Atanasoff was indeed the father of the electronic digital computer, and the United States and Iowa State honored him for his invention in 1974.
www.taborcommunications.com /hpcwire/hpcwireWWW/03/1031/106295.html   (913 words)

  
 Inventor John Atanasoff Biography
Atanasoff's interest in this topic was reportedly developed in responce to the inadequate computation aids available to him while he was writing his doctoral thesis, a computationally-intensive paper.
John Mauchly's construction of ENIAC, the first Turing-complete computer, with J. Presper Eckert in the mid 1940s has has led to controversy over who was the actual inventor of the computer.
Atanasoff and graduate student Clifford Berry built a prototype ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Computer) in 1939, and a full-scale model in 1942.
www.ideafinder.com /history/inventors/atanasoff.htm   (1237 words)

  
 News
John Vincent Atanasoff is the father of the first electronic digital computer.
Atanasoff's life and work were recognized and honored in two books: Alice R. and Arthur W. Burks, The First Electronic Computer: The Atanasoff Story, The University of Michigan Press, 1988; and Clark R. Mollenhoff's Atanasoff, Forgotten Father of the Computer, Iowa State University Press, 1988.
Atanasoff died in 1995 at the age of 91.
www.iastate.edu /news/releases/97/bios.html   (706 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff
John Vincent Atanasoff was born on October 4, 1903 a few miles west of Hamilton, New York.
John was a brother to Ethelyn, Margaret, Theodore, Avis, Raymond, Melva, and Irving.
In 1974 John was asked to be the guest of honor and grand marshall at the annual Veisha celebration.
www.east-buc.k12.ia.us /99_00/PK/ja.htm   (736 words)

  
 J.V. Atanasoff
John Vincent Atanasoff was born on 4 October 1903 in Hamilton, New York.
Atanasoff then returned to Iowa State College as an assistant professor in mathematics and physics in 1936.
In recognition of his achivement, Atanasoff was awarded the National Medal of Technology by President George Bush at the White house on November 13, 1990.
www.thocp.net /biographies/atanasoff_john.html   (1631 words)

  
 News Releases: Iowa State University
The endowment is being established with an estate gift from John Atanasoff II, whose father, John Vincent Atanasoff (along with graduate student Clifford Berry) invented the world's first electronic digital computer at Iowa State between 1939 and 1942.
John Vincent Atanasoff was a former physics and math professor at Iowa State, and received his master's degree in mathematics from ISU in 1926.
President Geoffroy thanked John Atanasoff II and his family for their gift, which will enhance Iowa State's future academic programs through an endowed faculty position, fellowships or scholarships.
www.iastate.edu /~nscentral/releases/2003/oct/atanasoff.shtml   (259 words)

  
 COSMIC BASEBALL ASSOCIATION- John V. Atanasoff: 1998 Cosmic Player Plate
Atanasoff's achievement made it obvious that the electronic computer would be useful in hundreds of ways.
John Vincent Atanasoff was born in New York.
Atanasoff spent 15 years teaching at Iowa State University and in the early 1940s, during World War Two, he went to Washington, D.C. His work with the digital computer was put aside in Washington when he began working at the Naval Ordnance Lab in White Oak, Maryland.
www.cosmicbaseball.com /atanaso8.html   (489 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff's Special-Purpose Electronic Digital Computer
Working alongside one of his graduate students (the brilliant Clifford Berry), Atanasoff commenced work on an electronic computer in early 1939, and had a prototype machine by the autumn of that year.
Atanasoff's design utilized capacitors to store electrical charge that could represent numbers in the form of logic 0s and logic 1s.
The presence or absence of these spots could be automatically determined by the machine later, because the electrical resistance of a carbonized spot varied from that of the blank card.
www.maxmon.com /1939bad.htm   (440 words)

  
 John Atanasoff - Construction   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
John Vincent Atanasoff built the first electronic digital computer in 1939, with the assistance of Clifford Berry.
These ideas were communicated to John Mauchly, who used them in the design of the ENIAC built years later.
Atanasoff left Iowa State on leave for a defense-related position, Chief of the Acoustics Division at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in Washington, D.C. In 1945, he was awarded the U.S. Navy Distinguished Service Award, the Navy's highest honor awarded to civilians.
www.wiu.edu /users/mfbdw/jva/html/story3.htm   (256 words)

  
 DIY Calculator :: First Electronic Computers
We now turn our attention to an American mathematician and physicist, John Vincent Atanasoff (1903-1995), who has the dubious honor of being known as the man who either did or did not construct the first truly electronic special-purpose digital computer.
The brainchild of John William Mauchly (1907-1980) and J. Presper Eckert Jr.
The bottom line was an official ruling that John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry had constructed the first electronic digital computer at Iowa State College between 1939 and 1942.
www.diycalculator.com /sp-eleccomp.shtml   (2445 words)

  
 John Atanasoff   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Alice Atanasoff, the widow of the Inventor, his son John Atanasoff II, and the other family members who accompanied them met with prominent public figures at the towns of Sofia, Blaghoevgrad, Pleven, Veliko Turnovo, Varna, Yambol, the village of Boyadjik, and Plovdiv.
Especially moving was the meeting of the Atanasoff family with the public figures and community of the village of Boyadjik, the birthplace of Ivan Atanasoff, the Father of the Inventor.
Alice Atanasoff, John Atanasoff’s wife, and members of the family visited Republic of Bulgaria on 16-29 June 2002 at the invitation of the Initiative Committee for Building a Monument to John Atanasoff and TANGRA TanNakRa All Bulgarian Foundation.
tangra.bitex.com /eng/atanasoff/poseshtenie.htm   (371 words)

  
 Atanasoff John Vincent - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Atanasoff John Vincent - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Atanasoff, John Vincent (1903-1995), American physicist, born in Hamilton, New York (state), who has been claimed to be the developer of certain...
More MSN Search results on "Atanasoff John Vincent"
uk.encarta.msn.com /Atanasoff_John_Vincent.html   (64 words)

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