Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Jonathan Swift


Related Topics

  
  Jonathan Swift
Swift was taken or "stolen" to England by his nurse, and at the age of four he was sent back to Ireland.
In 1695 Swift was ordained in the Church of Ireland (Anglican), Dublin.
Swift once stated that "satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own." At its core the tale a simple narrative of a father who has triplets, Martin, Peter and Jack; they refer to different churches.
www.kirjasto.sci.fi /jswift.htm   (1632 words)

  
  Jonathan swift a modest proposal - A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift - Free eBook   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Jonathan Swift - A Modest Proposal - misc.kids.pregnancy
Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal - Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal.
Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" and Alexander Pope's " The
basecube.info /bzhk/jonathan-swift-a-modest-proposal.html   (1333 words)

  
  Jonathan Swift - LoveToKnow 1911
JONATHAN SWIFT (1667-1745), dean of St Patrick's, Dublin, British satirist, was born at No. 7 Hoey's Court, Dublin, on the 30th of November 1667, a few months after the death of his father, Jonathan Swift (1640-1667), who married about 1664 Abigaile Erick, of an old Leicestershire family.
Swift was to be his chaplain and secretary, but upon reaching Ireland Berkeley gave the secretaryship to a Mr Bushe, who had persuaded him that it was an unfit post for a clergyman.
Swift's pamphlets, written in a style more level with the popular intelligence than even his own ordinary manner, are models alike to the controversialist who aids a good cause and to him who is burdened with a bad one.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Jonathan_Swift   (7653 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift: A Brief Biography
Jonathan Swift was born on November 30, 1667 in Dublin, Ireland, the son of Protestant Anglo-Irish parents: his ancestors had been Royalists, and all his life he would be a High-Churchman.
His father, also Jonathan, died a few months before he was born, upon which his mother, Abigail, returned to England, leaving her son behind, in the care of relatives.
There Swift read extensively in his patron's library, and met Esther Johnson, who would become his "Stella," and it was there, too, that he began to suffer from Meniere's Disease, a disturbance of the inner ear which produces nausea and vertigo, and which was little understood in Swift's day.
www.victorianweb.org /previctorian/swift/bio.html   (971 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift - MSN Encarta
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist and political pamphleteer, considered one of the greatest masters of English prose and one of the most impassioned satirists of human folly and pretension.
Swift was born in Dublin on November 30, 1667, and educated at Trinity College in that city.
Swift's satire was originally intended as an allegorical and acidic attack on the vanity and hypocrisy of contemporary courts, statesmen, and political parties, but in the writing of his book, which is presumed to have taken more than six years, he incorporated his ripest reflections on human society.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575255/Swift_Jonathan.html   (901 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift's Voyage to Laputa (Draft Lecture)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Jonathan Swift's Voyage to Laputa April 7, 1998 Russell McNeil Of the four parts of Gulliver's Travels, the third, the Voyage to Laputa, is for many the least satisfying and least understood.
Swift uses this material -- extrapolated of course to ludicrous extremes - which he then blends with the then prevalent attitude that all mathematical and theoretical learning was "useless," to weave his underlying message that the "virtuosi" of his day had lost sight of the world at large.
Swift's idea for using 600 hogs simultaneously furrowing and manuring a field was drawn from a 1702 paper on the Culturing of Tobacco in Zeylon where Buffaloes were used in a similar fashion.
www.mala.bc.ca /~mcneil/lec/lecswiftlap.htm   (2393 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: Jonathan Swift   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Jonathan Swift was born on 30 November 1667, in Dublin.
Swift's first significant publication was “An Ode to the Athenian Society” in 1692, the year in which he took an M.A. from Hart Hall, Oxford, in the hope of advancing his career.
Swift also wrote one of the few pamphlets to bear his name, “a proposal for correcting, improving, and ascertaining the English tongue” (1712), which argued for the establishment of an academy to fix and purify language; he later parodied this idea himself in Gulliver's Travels.
www.literaryencyclopedia.com /php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=4891   (2294 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift. William Makepeace Thackeray. 1909-14. Essays: English and American. The Harvard Classics
Swift’s seems to me to be as good a name to point a moral or adorn a tale of ambition, as any hero’s that ever lived and failed.
Swift’s eyes were as azure as the heavens; Pope says nobly (as everything Pope said and thought of his friend was good and noble), “His eyes are as azure as the heavens, and have a charming archness in them.” And one person in that household, that pompous, stately, kindly Moor Park, saw heaven nowhere else.
In the famous Lilliputian kingdom, Swift speaks with approval of the practice of instantly removing children from their parents and educating them by the State; and amongst his favourite horses, a pair of foals are stated to be the very utmost a well-regulated equine couple would permit themselves.
www.bartleby.com /28/1.html   (6482 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift - Books and Biography
Swift was taken or "stolen" to England by his nurse, and at the age of four he was sent back to Ireland.
From 1695 to 1696 Swift was the vicar of Kilroot, Laracor from 1700, and prebendary of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin (1701).
Swift had predicted his mental decay when he was about 50 and had remarked to the poet Edward Young when they were gazing at the withered crown of a tree: "I shall be like that tree, I shall die from the top." He died in Dublin on October 19, 1745.
www.readprint.com /author-79/Jonathan-Swift   (1033 words)

  
 Swift   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Swift was the grandson of a Royalist vicar of Yorkshire, whose three sons sought their fortune in Ireland after the Restoration settlement.
Swift was back in Ireland again; he was 27 years old and he had had to appeal to Temple for a testimonial, since so much time had elapsed since he took his degree.
Swift's poetry, in addition to his account of his friendship with Esther Vanhomrigh, consisted of annual pieces to the other Esther (Stella) on her birthday; they are charming verses of considerable grace.
www.hertford.ox.ac.uk /alumni/swift.htm   (2284 words)

  
 JONATHAN SWIFT - LoveToKnow Article on JONATHAN SWIFT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Swift was to be his chaplain and secretary, but upon reaching Ireland Berkeley gave the secretaryship to a Mr Bushe, who had persuaded him that it was an unfit post for a clergyman.
With bitter indignation Swift denounced the simony and threw up his chaplaincy, but he was ultimately reconciled to Berkeley by the presentation to the rectory of Agher in Meath with the united vicarages of Laracor and Rathbeggan, to which was added the prebend of Dunlavin in St Patricksthe total value being about 230 a year.
Swift may have learned that Esther means star from the Elemenla linguae persicae of John Galaves or from some Persian scholar; but he is more likely to have seen the etymology in the form given from Jewish sources in Buxtorfs Lexicon, where the interpretation takes the more suggestive form Stella Veneris.
66.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SW/SWIFT_JONATHAN.htm   (7530 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift Encyclopedia Article @ NaturalResearch.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Swift is probably the foremost prose satirist in the English language, although he is also well known for his poetry and essays.
Swift was offered and accepted the post of secretary and chaplain to the Earl of Berkeley, one of the Lords Justices, but when he reached Ireland he found that the secretaryship had been given to another.
Jonathan Swift, anglo-Irish author and journalist, dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral (Dublin) from 1713, the foremost prose satirist in English language, was born in Dublin, Ireland on 30 November 1667, 2nd child and only son of Jonathan Swift and Abigail Erick Swift.
www.naturalresearch.org /encyclopedia/Jonathan_Swift   (2316 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift - Biography & Works
Jonathan Swift was born in Dublin, Ireland on 30 November 1667, as the only son of Jonathan Swift and Abigaile Erick Swift.
Swift’s most famous book “Gulliver's Travels” was published in 1726 and was the first serious work in prose written by the author.
Swift died on 19 October 1745 and was buried in St Patrick's cathedral.
www.literaturecollection.com /a/swift   (199 words)

  
 Swift, Jonathan - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Swift, Jonathan
It was in this village that Jonathan Swift wrote the poem ‘Carberiae Rupes’, in 1723.
A political pamphleteer and piercing satirist, Swift wrote his masterpiece Gulliver's Travels, a criticism of society and its institutions, set in an imaginary land of fantastic creatures, after his return to Dublin as the dean of St Patrick's.
Swift became secretary to the diplomat William Temple (1628–1699) at Moor Park, Surrey, where his friendship with the child ‘Stella’ (Esther Johnson;; 1681–1728) began in 1689.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Swift,+Jonathan   (373 words)

  
 SPECTRUM Biographies - Jonathan Swift
Irish author and satirist Jonathan Swift was born November 30, 1667 in Dublin.
Although Swift had been a member of the Whig party since birth, he was uncomfortable with many of the party's beliefs.
Jonathan Swift died in Dublin on October 19, 1745.
www.incwell.com /Biographies/Swift.html   (670 words)

  
 Malaspina Great Books - Jonathan Swift (1667)
Swift uses this scientific material -- extrapolated of course to ludicrous extremes -- and draws on the then prevalent attitude that mathematical and theoretical learning was useless, to weave his underlying message that the virtuosi of his day had lost sight of the world at large.
Swift's idea for using 600 hogs simultaneously furrowing and manuring a field was drawn from a 1702 paper on the Culturing of Tobacco in Zeylon where Buffaloes were used in a similar fashion.
Swift's visit to Glubbdubdrib - the island of sorcerers and magicians - - where he is able to call back the dead - is a transparent copy of the ancient satirist Lucian where similar encounters with the dead were described.
www.malaspina.org /home.asp?topic=./search/details&lastpage=./search/results&ID=173   (9247 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift
In the aftermath of the 1689 Jacobite rebellion in Ireland, Swift found shelter in England, under the auspices of Sir William Temple, a prominent diplomat and statesman.
Swift took over The Examiner, a Tory rag, and, with a couple of 1711 pamphlets, helped turn to the tide of English public opinion against the "Whig" War of Spanish Succession.
Having served his role as an Irish patriot and Tory critic of Whig policies, Swift is duly celebrated in William Butler Yeats's poem "The Seven Sages" and in "Swift's Epitaph".
cepa.newschool.edu /het/profiles/swift.htm   (977 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift at AllExperts
Jonathan Swift was born at No. 7, Hoey's Court, Dublin, the second child and only son of Jonathan and Abigail Erick (or Herrick) Swift, English immigrants.
Swift was part of the inner circle of the Tory government and often acted as mediator between Henry St. John (Viscount Bolingbroke) the secretary of state for foreign affairs (1710-15) and Robert Harley (Earl of Oxford) lord treasurer and prime minister (1711-4).
Swift furnished Hester with the nickname "Vanessa" and she features as one of the main characters in his poem "Cadenus and Vanessa." The poem and their correspondence suggests that Hester was infatuated with Swift, that he may have reciprocated her affections, only to regret it and then try to break it off.
en.allexperts.com /e/j/jo/jonathan_swift.htm   (3397 words)

  
 A modest proposal - A Modest Proposal, by Jonathan Swift. Read it now for Free! (Homepage)
A modest proposal - A Modest Proposal, by Jonathan Swift.
"A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift - Swift's "A Modest Proposal"
Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" is generally considered to be the most famous satirical essay in the English language.
xn--zhq692d06i.com /?q=a-modest-proposal   (549 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift Summary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Jonathan Swift was born in Dublin, Ireland, on Nov. 30, 1667...
Seventeenth-century British writer Jonathan Swift is considered to be perhaps the foremost prose satirist in the English language and one of the greatest masters of that form in world literature.
Swift, Jonathan(1667–1745) Jonathan Swift, the British clergyman, moralist, satirist, poet, and political journalist, was born in Dublin, a few months after his father's death.
www.bookrags.com /Jonathan_Swift   (476 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift
Swift found the position trying, though he calls Temple "a man of sense and virtue." In 1694 he quarreled with his employer and returned to Ireland to seek ordination, obtaining the small living of Kilroot, near Belfast.
Swift had a hand in her education; she was now, at 15, growing into a very beautiful woman.
Swift rode down to Marley Abbey, where she was staying, with a terrible countenance, petrified her with a frown, and departed, flinging on the table a packet containing her letter to Stella.
www.nndb.com /people/691/000055526   (1488 words)

  
 Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels Criticism and Essays
Throughout the volume Swift attacked the baseness of humankind even as he suggested the greatest virtues of the human race; he also attacked the folly of human learning and political systems even as he implied the proper functions of art, science, and government.
Merrel D. Clubb has noted that "the longer that one studies Swift, the more obvious it becomes that the interpretations and verdict to be placed on the 'Voyage to the Houyhnhnms' is, after all, the central problem of Swift criticism." Much of the controversy surrounds three possible interpretations of the Houyhnhnms and the Yahoos.
The eighteenth-century critics were most concerned with depicting Swift's perceived immorality and misanthropy, and they often argued their case with the help of misrepresentations, or deliberate fabrications of facts.
www.enotes.com /literary-criticism/swift-jonathan-gulliver-s-travels   (1753 words)

  
 Jonathan Swift - Penguin Classics Authors - Penguin Classics
Jonathan Swift (1667 – 1745) was a poet, satirist and clergyman; his parents were English but he was born in Dublin.
Jonathan Swift’s cousin, the poet John Dryden, told him he would never be a poet, but he soon became known as a poet and writer.
Swift was always afraid of madness and often suffered from depression; he suffered serious ill health in his last years.
www.penguinclassics.co.uk /nf/Author/AuthorPage/0,,10_1000016392,00.html   (333 words)

  
 Fictionwise eBooks: Jonathan Swift
Bio: Jonathan Swift is almost universally accorded a leading place among the greatest of prose satirists.
At the age of six, Swift entered Kilkenny School, the foremost Anglican academy in Ireland, and at fourteen he was admitted to Trinity College, Dublin.
Swift returned briefly to London in 1726 with a manuscript of Gulliver's Travels, a devastating satire of English politics and society.
www.fictionwise.com /eBooks/JonathanSwifteBooks.htm   (698 words)

  
 Amazon.de: Jonathan Swift: English Books: Victoria Glendinning   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Glendinning believes that you can't find Swift in his work so she seeks him out in private places; in letters to and from his young girlfriends, Stella and Vanessa, and in his relationships with powerful thinkers and writers of the time such as Alexander Pope.
Swift (1667-1745) is best known to many as the author of Gulliver's Travels; for others, he is more vividly remembered for A Modest Proposal, in which--with the textual equivalent of a deadpan expression--he offered Ireland's British rulers a solution to Irish overpopulation and poverty:
Glendinning quotes extensively from Swift's prose and poetry, probing the political and aesthetic sensibilities that led him to such dark assessments of human nature, but she is just as strong--if not stronger--in her assessment of the two great romantic relationships in his life, with Esther Johnson ("Stella") and Hester Vanhomrigh ("Vanessa").
www.amazon.de /Jonathan-Swift-Victoria-Glendinning/dp/0712662626   (1030 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.