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Topic: Joseph Louis Lagrange


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Joseph Louis Lagrange - LoveToKnow 1911
JOSEPH LOUIS LAGRANGE (1736-1813), French mathematician, was born at Turin, on the 25th of January 1736.
His father, Joseph Louis Lagrange, married Maria Theresa Gros, only daughter of a rich physician at Cambiano, and had by her eleven children, of whom only the eldest (the subject of this notice) and the youngest survived infancy.
The prize was again awarded to Lagrange; and he earned the same distinction with essays on the problem of three bodies in 1772, on the secular equation of the moon in 1774, and in 1778 on the theory of cometary perturbations.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Joseph_Louis_Lagrange   (3346 words)

  
 Lagrange biography
Lagrange was the eldest of their 11 children but one of only two to live to adulthood.
Lagrange was a major contributor to the first volumes of the Mélanges de Turin volume 1 of which appeared in 1759, volume 2 in 1762 and volume 3 in 1766.
Lagrange was greeted warmly by most members of the Academy and he soon became close friends with Lambert and Johann(III) Bernoulli.
www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/Biographies/Lagrange.html   (2944 words)

  
 The Founders Of Classical Mechanics :: Joseph Louis Lagrange
Lagrange was a favourite of the king, who used frequently to discourse to him on the advantages of perfect regularity of life.
Lagrange, who was present, now discussed the whole subject afresh, and in a memoir communicated to the Academy in 1808 explained how, by the variation of arbitrary constants, the periodical and secular inequalities of any system of mutually interacting bodies could be determined.
Lagrange's interests were essentially those of a student of pure mathematics: he sought and obtained far-reaching abstract results, and was content to leave the applications to others.
about-physicists.org /lagrange.html   (3116 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange
In 1758 Lagrange established with the aid of his pupils a society, which was subsequently incorporated as the Turin Academy, and in the five volumes of its transactions, usually known as the Miscellanea Taurinensia, most of his early writings are to be found.
In 1761 Lagrange stood without a rival as the foremost mathematician living; but the unceasing labour of the preceding nine years had seriously affected his health, and the doctors refused to be responsible for his reason or life unless he would take rest and exercise.
Lagrange, who was present, now discussed the whole subject afresh, and in a memoir communicated to the Academy in 1808 explained how, by the variation of arbitrary constants, the periodical and secular inequalities of any system of mutually interacting bodies could be determined.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/jo/Joseph-Louis_de_Lagrange.html   (3019 words)

  
  Joseph Louis Lagrange - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lagrange developed the mean value theorem which led to a proof of the fundamental theorem of calculus, and a proof of Taylor's theorem.
Lagrange also invented the method of solving differential equations known as variation of parameters, applied differential calculus to the theory of probabilities and attained notable work on the solution of equations.
Lagrange, who was present, now discussed the whole subject afresh, and in a letter communicated to the Academy in 1808 explained how, by the variation of arbitrary constants, the periodical and secular inequalities of any system of mutually interacting bodies could be determined.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Joseph_Louis_Lagrange   (3527 words)

  
 Lagrange, Joseph Louis
Lagrange's mathematical contributions began as early as 1754 with the discovery of the calculus of variations and continued with applications to mechanics in 1756.
Lagrange's mathematical career can be viewed as natural extension of the work of his older and greater contemporary, Euler, which in many respects he carried forward and refined.
Lagrange's major works were in the equations of motion and the understanding of potential energy.
www.iasbs.ac.ir /faculty/pirayesh/calculus_thomas/content/b_histbiogs/bios/lagrange.htm   (371 words)

  
 LAGRANGE, JOSEPH LOUIS, COMTE. The Columbia Encyclopedia: Sixth Edition. 2000   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The memoirs of the academy were enriched by his distinguished treatises, and during this time he wrote his chief work, Mécanique analytique, a treatment of mechanics based solely on algebra and the calculus and containing not a single diagram or geometric explanation.
In 1793 he became president of the commission on weights and measures; he was influential in causing the adoption of the decimal base for the metric system.
Under Napoleon, Lagrange was made senator and count; he is buried in the Panthéon.
www.bartleby.com /aol/65/la/Lagrange.html   (295 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Joseph Louis Lagrange
Lagranges theorem, in the mathematics of group theory, states that if G is a finite group and H is a subgroup of G, then the order (that is, the number of elements) of H divides the order of G. It is named after Joseph Lagrange.
Lagrange is a lunar crater that is attached to the northwestern rim of Piazzi crater.
The prize was again awarded to Lagrange; and he earned the same distinction with essays on the problem of three bodies in 1772, on the secular equation of the moon in- 1774, and in 1778 on the theory of cometary perturbations.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Joseph-Louis-Lagrange   (7424 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange, Comte Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Joseph Louis Lagrange was born in Turin on Jan. 25, 1736; both his parents had French ancestors, and Lagrange wrote all his works in French.
Lagrange did not explicitly recognize groups, but he obtained implicitly some of the simpler properties, including the theorem known after him, which states that the order of a subgroup is a divisor of the order of the group.
Lagrange did not regard the principle as an axiom but rather as a general expression of the law of equilibrium deduced from the laws of the lever and the composition of forces or, alternatively, from the properties of strings and pulleys.
www.bookrags.com /biography/joseph-louis-lagrange-comte   (1600 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange
Lagrange created the calculus of variations which was later expanded by Weierstrass.
The first fruit of Lagrange's labours here was his letter, written when he was still only nineteen, to Leonhard Euler, in which he solved the isoperimetrical problem which for more than half a century had been a subject of discussion.
Lagrange, who was present, now discussed the whole subject afresh, and in a letter communicated to the Academy in 1808 explained how, by the variation of arbitrary constants, the periodical and secular inequalities of any system of mutually interacting bodies could be determined.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/j/jo/joseph_louis_lagrange.html   (3288 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange
Lagrange did not seek fame and saw no reason to come to Prussia while Euler, who he had much respect for, already had the position of director of mathematics at the Berlin Academy.
Lagrange's work, which included subjects such as the calculus of variations, probabilities, the principle of least action, kinetic energy, and propagation of sound, appears in the first three volumes, published in 1759, '62, and '66.
In 1764, Lagrange won the prize competition from the Académie des Sciences in Paris on the subject of the libration, or "wobble", of the moon.
numericalmethods.eng.usf.edu /anecdotes/lagrange.html   (971 words)

  
 Lagrange biography
Lagrange was the eldest of their 11 children but one of only two to live to adulthood.
Lagrange was a major contributor to the first volumes of the Mélanges de Turin volume 1 of which appeared in 1759, volume 2 in 1762 and volume 3 in 1766.
Lagrange was greeted warmly by most members of the Academy and he soon became close friends with Lambert and Johann(III) Bernoulli.
www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk /Biographies/Lagrange.html   (2944 words)

  
 Joseph-Louis Lagrange
On the 6th of November 1766, Lagrange was installed in his new position, with a salary of 6000 francs, ample leisure for scientific research, and royal favor sufficient to secure him respect without exciting envy.
By means of this "calculus of derived functions" Lagrange hoped to give to the solution of all analytical problems the utmost "rigor of the demonstrations of the ancients"; but it cannot be said that the attempt was successful.
The final achievement of Lagrange in this direction was the extension of the method of the variation of arbitrary constants, successfully used by him in the investigation of periodical as well as of secular inequalities, to any system whatever of mutually interacting bodies.
www.nndb.com /people/380/000087119   (3296 words)

  
 Fermat's Last Theorem: Joseph-Louis Lagrange
Joseph-Louis Lagrange was born in Turin, Italy on January 25, 1736.
When Lagrange was 19, he sent a letter to the famous mathematician Leonhard Euler describing a solution to the isoperimetrical problem.
Lagrange was still working on a revision of his Mecanique Analytique when he died in 1813.
fermatslasttheorem.blogspot.com /2005/09/joseph-louis-lagrange.html   (719 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange (1736 - 1813)
Joseph Louis Lagrange, the greatest mathematician of the eighteenth century, was born at Turin on January 25, 1736, and died at Paris on April 10, 1813.
Lagrange was a favourite of the king, who used frequently to discourse to him on the advantages of perfect regularity of life.
In 1810 Lagrange commenced a thorough revision of the
www.maths.tcd.ie /pub/HistMath/People/Lagrange/RouseBall/RB_Lagrange.html   (3021 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange --Great Minds, Great Thinkers
In 1761 Lagrange stood without a rival as the foremost mathematician living; but the unceasing labour of the preceding nine years had seriously affected his health, and the doctors refused to be responsible for his reason or life unless he would take rest and exercise.
Lagrange, who was present, now discussed the whole subject afresh, and in a memoir communicated to the Academy in 1808 explained how, by the variation of arbitrary constants, the periodical and secular inequalities of any system of mutually interacting bodies could be determined.
Lagrange's interests were essentially those of a student of pure mathematics: he sought and obtained far-reaching abstract results, and was content to leave the applications to others.
www.edinformatics.com /great_thinkers/lagrange.htm   (2993 words)

  
 Joseph-Louis Lagrange
Lagrange was largely self-taught and did not have the benefit of studying with leading mathematicians.
Lagrange used a discrete mass model for his vibrating string, which he took to consist of n masses joined by weightless strings.
Lagrange was made a member of the committee of the Académie des Sciences to standardize weights and measures in May 1790.
www.stetson.edu /~efriedma/periodictable/html/Lr.html   (892 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Joseph Louis Lagrange Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Joseph Louis Lagrange (January 25, 1736 – April 10, 1813) was an Italian mathematician and astronomer who later lived in France and Prussia.
The first fruit of Lagrange's labours here was his letter, written when he was still only nineteen, to Leonhard Euler, in which he solved the isoperimetrical problem which for more than half a century had been a subject of discussion.
Two memoirs in which the method of determining the orbit of a comet from three observations is completely worked out, 1778 and 1783: this has not indeed proved practically available, but his system of calculating the perturbations by means of mechanical quadratures has formed the basis of most subsequent researches on the subject.
www.ipedia.com /joseph_louis_lagrange.html   (3033 words)

  
 Joseph-Louis Lagrange   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Lagrange was a major contributor to the first volumes of the Mélanges de Turin volume 1 of which appeared in 1759, volume 2 in 1762 and volume 3 in 1766.
Lagrange succeeded Euler as Director of Mathematics at the Berlin Academy of Science on 6 November 1766.
Lagrange was made a member of the committee of the Académie des Sciences to standardise weights and measures in May 1790.
www.profcardy.com /matematicos/lagrange.htm   (3996 words)

  
 Joseph Louis, Comte Lagrange - Encyclopedia.com
Lagrange, Joseph Louis, Comte, 1736-1813, French mathematician and astronomer, b.
The memoirs of the academy were enriched by his distinguished treatises, and during this time he wrote his chief work, Mécanique analytique, a treatment of mechanics based solely on algebra and the calculus and containing not a single diagram or geometric explanation.
In 1793 he became president of the commission on weights and measures; he was influential in causing the adoption of the decimal base for the metric system.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Lagrange.html   (422 words)

  
 Lagrange, Joseph Louis Lagrange - Famous mathematicians pictures, posters, gifts items, note cards, greeting cards, and ...
Lagrange's image is inscribed with the "Euler-Lagrange equation", a seminal differential equation in the 'calculus of variations', which concerns itself with paths, curves, and surfaces for which a given function has a stationary value.
Lagrange's portrait shares a color palette with other pioneers of calculus, including Newton, Leibniz, and Laplace,
Lagrange's image is backed by a color plot of fields surrounding points in space, overlaid by a triangle identifying and connecting 3 critical "Lagrangian points", named after Lagrange who first showed their existence.
www.mathematicianspictures.com /Mathematicians/Lagrange.htm   (342 words)

  
 Joseph Louis Lagrange Summary
Although Joseph Louis Lagrange was born in Turin, in the Italian kingdom of Piedmont, on January 25, 1736, he was of French ancestry.
Lagrange proved to be a mathematical prodigy; he was teaching geometry at the Royal Artillery School in Turin at the age of eighteen, and he established the Turin Academy of Sciences in 1758.
Lagrange is highly regarded both for the originality of his work and the rigor and generality of his mathematical proofs.
www.bookrags.com /Joseph_Louis_Lagrange   (7560 words)

  
 Lagrange
Lagrange excelled in all fields of analysis and number theory and analytical and celestial mechanics.
Lagrange's interest in mathematics began at a very early age when he read a copy of a book by Halley.
Lagrange served as professor of geometry at the Royal Artillery School in Turin from 1755 to 1766 and helped to found the Royal Academy of Science there in 1757.
library.wolfram.com /examples/quintic/people/Lagrange.html   (337 words)

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