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Topic: Joseph Stiglitz


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
  Joseph E. Stiglitz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and winner of the John Bates Clark Medal (1979) and Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics (2001).
Stiglitz was born in Gary, Indiana, to Charlotte and Nathaniel Stiglitz.
Stiglitz is currently a Professor at Columbia University, with appointments at the Business School, the Department of Economics and the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), and is editor of The Economists' Voice journal with J.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Joseph_Stiglitz   (611 words)

  
 Joseph E. Stiglitz -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an (A native or inhabitant of the United States) American economist, author and winner of (Click link for more info and facts about Nobel Prize for economics) Nobel Prize for economics (2001).
Stiglitz was born in (A city in northwest Indiana on Lake Michigan; steel production) Gary, (A state in midwestern United States) Indiana, to Charlotte and Nathaniel Stiglitz.
Stiglitz was forced out of the World Bank by (The position of the head of the Treasury Department) Treasury Secretary (Click link for more info and facts about Lawrence Summers) Lawrence Summers.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/j/jo/joseph_e._stiglitz.htm   (579 words)

  
 Joseph E. Stiglitz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and Nobel laureate (2001).
Stiglitz' most famous research was on screening, a technique used by one economic agent to extract otherwise private information from another.
Along with his technical economic publications, Stiglitz is the author of Whither Socialism, a nonmathematical book providing an introduction to the theories behind economic socialism's failure in Eastern Europe, the role of imperfect information in markets, and misconceptions about how truly "free market" our free market capitalist system operates.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Joseph_Stiglitz   (448 words)

  
 Columbia News ::: Joseph Stiglitz Wins Nobel Prize for Economics: Third Economist to Win Prize in Six Years
Columbia University Professor Joseph Stiglitz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics on Wednesday (10-10-01) by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
Stiglitz, who thanked the National Science Foundation for supporting much of his research and the research universities where he has conducted his scholarship, noted that the September terrorist attacks tempered the joy he felt about winning the prize.
Stiglitz commented on the tax cut advocated by the Bush Administration and passed by Congress earlier this year, saying that it was not intended to boost the economy, but, rather, to limit the federal government's discretionary spending.
www.columbia.edu /cu/news/01/10/josephStiglitz_nobel_2001.html   (962 words)

  
 The New York Review of Books: Globalization: Stiglitz's Case
Stiglitz charges that the IMF has reverted to Herbert Hoover's economics in imposing these policies on countries during deep recessions, when the deficit is mostly the result of an induced decline in revenues; he argues that cuts in spending or tax hikes only make the downturn worse.
Stiglitz also thinks it is no coincidence that food subsidies and other ways of cushioning the hardships suffered by the poor are among the first programs that the IMF tells countries to cut when they need to balance their budgets.
Stiglitz has presented, as effectively as it is possible to imagine anyone making it, his side of the argument, including the substantive case for the kind of economic development policies he favors as well as his more specific indictment of what the IMF has done and why.
www.nybooks.com /articles/15630   (5620 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz - Social and Economic Policy - Global Policy Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Joseph Stiglitz accused IMF former managing director Michel Camdessus of saying that for a people to recover economically, “they must suffer.” Camdessus virulently denies the allegation, arguing that countries in financial crisis require strict adjustments to stabilize their economies, but “suffering” should not be a requirement.
Joseph Stiglitz was chief economist of the IMF during the height of the Asian financial crisis.
Joseph Stiglitz presents a checklist to assess whether developed countries were sincere when they committed themselves to give up their trade interests for the sake of development.
www.globalpolicy.org /socecon/bwi-wto/wbank/stigindx.htm   (2462 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz - Homepage
Joseph E. Stiglitz was born in Gary, Indiana in 1943.
A graduate of Amherst College, he received his PHD from MIT in 1967, became a full professor at Yale in 1970, and in 1979 was awarded the John Bates Clark Award, given biennially by the American Economic Association to the economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the field.
Stiglitz helped create a new branch of economics, "The Economics of Information," exploring the consequences of information asymmetries and pioneering such pivotal concepts as adverse selection and moral hazard, which have now become standard tools not only of theorists, but of policy analysts.
www-1.gsb.columbia.edu /faculty/jstiglitz/bio.cfm   (333 words)

  
 Salon Feature | Silencing Joseph Stiglitz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
When Stiglitz announced last year that he was leaving the bank and returning to academic life, there were rumors that he was pushed out because he was too outspoken.
Stiglitz compared it to President Herbert Hoover's insistence on balancing the budget as the Depression swept across the country.
Stiglitz is encouraged that world attention is now focused on the previously obscure decisions of the bank and IMF.
www.salon.com /news/feature/2000/05/02/stiglitz/print.html   (1612 words)

  
 Amherst College: News & Events: News Releases : Joseph E. Stiglitz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Stiglitz, a 1964 graduate of Amherst, is the 2001 recipient of the Nobel prize in economic science.
Stiglitz served as chief economist and senior vice president, development economics, at the World Bank from 1997 until 2000.
Stiglitz is a leading scholar of the economics of the public sector.
www.amherst.edu /~pubaff/news/news_releases/01/stiglitz.html   (282 words)

  
 Stiglitz, the IMF and Globalization -- Speech by Thomas C. Dawson, Director, External Relations Department, IMF
Stiglitz tries to provide a grand theme for all this by claiming that all these mistakes are due to the IMF's slavish devotion to what he calls "market fundamentalism".
Stiglitz notes that Stanley Fischer, the former deputy head of the IMF and former MIT professor of economics, went straight from the IMF to Citigroup.
Stiglitz surely knows that Fischer is regarded as a man of unimpeachable integrity and yet he cannot resist the jibe at him.
www.imf.org /external/np/speeches/2002/061302.htm   (3188 words)

  
 The globalizer who came in from the cold: Joseph Stiglitz
But instead of chairing the meetings of ministers and central bankers, Stiglitz was kept outside the blue police cordons the same as the nuns carrying a large wooden cross, the Bolivian union leaders, the parents of AIDS victims, and the other "antiglobalization" protesters.
Stiglitz is particularly emotional over the WTO's intellectual property rights treaty, which goes by the acronym "TRIPS." It is here, says the economist, that the new global order has "condemned people to death" by imposing impossible tariffs and tributes to pay to pharmaceutical companies for branded medicines.
Stiglitz proposed radical land reform, an attack at the heart of "landlordism" on the usurious rents charged by the propertied oligarchies worldwide, typically 50 percent of a tenant's crops.
www.thirdworldtraveler.com /Heroes/Joseph_Stiglitz.html   (1584 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Joseph Stiglitz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Stiglitz was born in Gary is a city located in Lake County in northwest Indiana in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois.
Stiglitz was forced out of the World Bank by The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States.
George A. Akerlof and Michael Spence is a winner of Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, along with George A. Akerlof and Joseph E. Stiglitz, for their work on the dynamics of information flows and market development.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Joseph-Stiglitz   (2472 words)

  
 AlterNet: The Globalizer Who Came in from the Cold
Instead of chairing the meetings of ministers and central bankers, Stiglitz was kept exiled safely behind the blue police cordons, the same as the nuns carrying a large wooden cross, the Bolivian union leaders, the parents of AIDS victims and the other "antiglobalization" protesters.
Stiglitz's greatest concern is that World Bank plans, devised in secrecy and driven by an absolutist ideology, are never open for discourse or dissent.
Stiglitz proposed radical land reform, an attack at the heart of "landlordism", on the usurious rents charged by the propertied oligarchies worldwide, typically 50 per cent of a tenant's crops.
www.alternet.org /story.html?StoryID=12652   (1914 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Books: Globalization and Its Discontents   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Stiglitz is clearly a first rate economist, the arguments he makes in his book are by no means watertight, but I found most of them to be very convincing.
Joseph Stiglitz, the author of "Globalization and Its Discontents", is a renowned professor of economics.
Stiglitz should have done was to tell a certain number of very specific stories that illustrate the message that he is trying to get across.
www.amazon.co.uk /exec/obidos/ASIN/014101038X   (2491 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz -- A Dangerous Man, A World Bank Insider Who Defected
Stiglitz came to Minnesota last week to speak at the annual Nobel Conference sponsored by Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter to coincide with the announcement of the Nobel prizes.
Stiglitz takes the debate to a higher level -- not just because he dissects the orthodoxy with its own tools, but because he uses the anecdotes of an insider to confirm the suspicions of the outsiders.
Stiglitz went home and had one of his World Bank researchers run a study; it turns out that foreign aid is actually a more stable revenue source than tax receipts for poor countries.
www.commondreams.org /views/101100-101.htm   (1167 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Joseph E. Stiglitz served on the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers from 1993 to 1997 under President Clinton.
Joseph E. Stiglitz was Chief Economist at the World Bank from 1996 until 1999, during which time he became quite critical of World Bank policy.
Stiglitz believes that many world policymakers need to rethink the global economic principles of liberalization, stabilization, and privatization and that the "Washington Consensus" needs to put more emphasis on creating political, judicial, and social structures that support economic modernization.
www.dickinson.edu /~mccartia/josephstiglitz.htm   (377 words)

  
 Rebel With a Cause
Stiglitz has not prepared a speech--half an hour earlier, as we were talking over lunch, he had completely forgotten the event was today--but that is the least of his worries.
Stiglitz's outspokenness, unprecedented for a high-ranking insider, infuriated top officials at the IMF and US Treasury Department, and eventually led James Wolfensohn, the World Bank's president, to inform him that he would have to mute his criticism or resign.
Such claims are no longer credible, for Stiglitz is part of a small but growing group of economists, sociologists and political scientists, among them Dani Rodrik of Harvard and Robert Wade of the London School of Economics, who not only take the critics seriously but warn that ignoring their concerns could have dire consequences.
www.thenation.com /doc/20020610/press   (1092 words)

  
 FT Columnist Martim Wolf discusses the flaws in Joseph Stiglitz's new book, 'Globalisation and its discontents'   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate economist, is loved on the streets and loathed in the suites.
Mr Stiglitz is absolutely right to blame the fund (and others) for their failure either to warn or protect countries adequately against these disasters.
Similarly, while Mr Stiglitz's charge against so-called "shock therapy" is exaggerated, that against the tacit support given by the IMF and the World Bank for horrifyingly corrupt and incompetent privatisation in Russia and some other countries in transition is right.
www.jubilee2000uk.org /opinion/wolf100702.htm   (956 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz
Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, professor of economics and finance at Columbia University Graduate School of Business and School of International and Public Affairs, will speak at Swarthmore College on Monday, Oct. 4, at 8:30 p.m.
Stiglitz, who has also taught at Yale, Princeton, Stanford, M.I.T., and was the Drummond Professor and a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics in 2001.
He was a member of the Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) from 1993-95 during the Clinton administration and served as CEA chairman from 1995-97.
www.swarthmore.edu /news/releases/04/stiglitz.html   (294 words)

  
 Joseph Stiglitz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Stiglitz's work has helped explain the circumstances in which markets do not work well, and how selective government intervention can improve their performance.
Stiglitz has written more than 300 articles, twelve books, and textbooks that have been translated into more than a dozen languages.
A graduate of Amherst College, Stiglitz received his PhD from MIT in 1967, became a full professor at Yale University in 1970, and in 1979 was awarded the John Bates Clark Award, given biennially by the American Economic Association to the economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the field.
www.columbia.edu /cu/sipa/RESEARCH/bios/jes322.html   (317 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World's Most Prosperous Decade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Stiglitz sees the 1990s as a brilliant economic success, but also a period in which faulty accounting, conflicts of interest, and botched deregulation schemes inflated a bubble that, when it burst, gave rise to the 2001 recession.
Joseph Stiglitz's "The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World's Most Prosperous Decade" is a thoughtful and compelling examination of the greed and corruption that ensues when markets are allowed to "regulate" themselves.
Stiglitz's, a neo-Keynesian economist, argues that the "roaring nineties" was the consequence of the forced retreat of the state from any direct involvement in the market.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0393058522?v=glance   (3221 words)

  
 The Phoenix Online - Economist rails against Bush economic policy in speech
Joseph Stiglitz, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, had a message for President George W. Bush: The much-heralded tax cuts did not work.
On Monday, Stiglitz addressed a packed crowd in the Science Center lecture hall, preaching largely to the converted on “Economics and the Election.” For over an hour, Stiglitz railed on the Bush administration’s plans for economic recovery, saving his most acrimonious critique for Alan Greenspan, the chairman of the Federal Reserve.
Furthermore, Stiglitz noted that the United States was contributing to “enormous global financial instability” by borrowing nearly $1.5 billion a day from various global markets.
phoenix.swarthmore.edu /2004-10-07/news/14301   (664 words)

  
 Salon.com Technology | The new gilded age and its discontents   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
At each step of his career, Stiglitz advocated for a critical look at what he calls "the Washington Consensus" -- the conventional wisdom that holds that everything bad in the economy can be laid at the government's door while everything good stems from the market.
The villains, Stiglitz argues, are obvious: The International Monetary Fund, Clinton Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers and Wall Street all come off badly, more concerned with ideology and their own bottom lines than with the facts.
Salon sat down with Stiglitz in New York and discussed accounting trickery, why government is necessary and the present state of the world economy.
www.salon.com /tech/feature/2002/07/03/stiglitz   (848 words)

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