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Topic: Judicial functions of the House of Lords


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  House of Lords - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
In addition, the Lord Chancellor is the head of the judiciary of England and Wales, serving as the president of the Supreme Court of England and Wales.
The judicial functions of the House of Lords originate from the ancient role of the Curia Regis as a body that addressed the petitions of the King's subjects.
The jurisdiction of the House of Lords extends, in civil and in criminal cases, to appeals from the courts of England and Wales, and of Northern Ireland.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/House_of_Lords   (7575 words)

  
 Judicial functions of the House of Lords
The House of Lords appointed a Committee for Petitions.
The position of the Lords Spiritual (the Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of England with seats in the House), however, was unclear.
"The Appellate Jurisdiction of the House of Lords." (2006).
www.jgames.co.uk /title/Judicial_functions_of_the_House_of_Lords   (4692 words)

  
  Encyclopedia: House-of-Lords   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
The House of Lords is an unelected body, consisting of two archbishops and 24 bishops of the established Church of England ("Lords Spiritual") and 706 members of the Peerage ("Lords Temporal").
The jurisdiction of the House of Lords extends, in civil and in criminal cases, to appeals from the courts of England and Wales, and of Northern Ireland.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/House_of_Lords   (12142 words)

  
 House of Lords   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The House of Lords is located in the Palace of Westminster, and is used for the State Opening of Parliament, as by convention, the Sovereign may not enter the elected House of Commons.
The Lords Spiritual consist of twenty-six clergymen of the Church of England, namely the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Archbishop of York, the Bishop of London, the Bishop of Durham, the Bishop of Winchester and the twenty-one longest-serving bishops of other dioceses.
The Lord Chancellor, as well as being a judge and the cabinet minister responsible for the judiciary and the courts, serves as the Lord Speaker of the House of Lords.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/house_of_lords   (2885 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
The House of Lords is located in the Palace of Westminster, and is used for the State Opening of Parliament, as by convention, the Sovereign may not enter the elected House of Commons.
The Lord Chancellor, as well as being a judge and the cabinet minister responsible for the judiciary and the courts, serves as the Lord Speaker of the House of Lords.
On 1st November 1999, the House of Lords was composed of 759 hereditary peers, 26 Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of England, and the 545 life peers created by either the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 or the Life Peerages Act 1958.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /House_of_Lords   (2976 words)

  
 House of Lords
In British politics, the House of Lords is the unelected upper house of the United Kingdom Parliament.
The House of Lords is presided over by the Lord Chancellor, the Government minister in charge of the Lord Chancellor's department which includes partial responsibilty for the administration of the British judicial system.
The House of Commons called an election in 1910 and the Liberals were successfully reelected, though not by as large a margin as the previous election.
www.ukpedia.com /h/house-of-lords.html   (1942 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: House-of-Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The House of Commons was created to serve as the political outlet for this "commons" class, while the elite estates were represented in the House of Lords.
The House of Commons was thus elected by the people while members of the upper house were appointed on the basis of various forms of elite "merit", such as wealth, family, or prestige.
House of Commons of Southern Ireland was the lower house of the Irish parliament created by the Government of Ireland Act, passed in 1920, during the Irish War of Independence.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/House_of_Commons   (1085 words)

  
 House of Lords (Pepys' Diary)
The House of Lords is the second house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as "the Lords".
The Parliament comprises the Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as "the Commons"), and the Lords.
Other ecclesiastics have sat in the House of Lords in recent times: Immanuel Jakobovits, was appointed to the House of Lords with the consent of the Queen, who acted on the advice of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher while he was Chief Rabbi.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/293.php   (7815 words)

  
 Thompson, 'Future Imperfect: Reform of the House of Lords', [2000] 4 Web JCLI   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Bingham, Lord (2000) `Reform of the House of Lords: Future of the Appellate Committee' Evidence to the Royal Commission on the Reform of the House of Lords at 0022.pdf in the CD-Rom which accompanies Wakeham 2000.
JUSTICE (2000) `The Judicial Functions of the House of Lords' Evidence to the Royal Commission on the Reform of the House of Lords at 0165.pdf in the CD-Rom which accompanies Wakeham 2000.
Lester, Lord (2000) `A Proposal Concerning the Parliamentary Scrutiny of Non-EU treaties' Evidence to the Royal Commission on the Reform of the House of Lords at 0090.pdf in the CD-Rom which accompanies Wakeham 2000.
webjcli.ncl.ac.uk /2000/issue4/thompson4.html   (7305 words)

  
 House of Lords - ArtPolitic Encyclopedia of Politics : Information Portal
The House of Lords is unique in combining both legislative and judicial functions in the one body: it is both the upper house of Parliament and the highest court of appeal for England (though it is only ad-hoc).
They are appointed for a term of years; at the end of which they no longer hear legal cases but remain members of the House of Lords for the rest of their lives.
The House of Lords is located in the Palace of Westminster even to this day.
www.artpolitic.org /infopedia/ho/House_of_Lords.html   (943 words)

  
 UK Politics - House of Lords
The House of Lords is the second chamber of the U.K. Houses of Parliament.
In general, the functions of the House of Lords are similar to those of the House of Commons in legislating, debating and questioning the executive.
The House of Lords is also the final court of appeal for civil cases in the United Kingdom and for criminal cases in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
www.britain.tv /ukpolitics_houseoflords.shtml   (794 words)

  
 The Ultimate Practice Statement - American History Information Guide and Reference   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Until 1966, the House of Lords in the United Kingdom was bound to follow all of its previous decisions under the principle of stare decisis, even if this created "injustice" and "unduly restrict(s) the proper development of the law" (London Tramways Co. v London City Council [1898] AC 375).
It does not affect the precedential value of cases in lower courts; all other courts that recognise the House of Lords as the court of last resort are still bound by House of Lords decisions.
Lord Gardiner's statement in the House of Lords, July 26, 1966.
www.historymania.com /american_history/Practice_Statement   (217 words)

  
 Proposal for a wholly appointed Lords   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A Proposal for a wholly appointed House of Lords
Lords appointed or elected for fixed terms would be incapable of evading the aforementioned pressures.
The number of seats in the House of Lords would be equal to the number of House of Commons constituencies (currently 659).
www.ukconstitution.net /politics/reforms/Lords_emsworth.html   (899 words)

  
 Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A further important change occurred in 1999, when hereditary peers were stripped of their automatic right to sit in the Lords, with ninety-two peers—the holders of the ceremonial offices of Lord Great Chamberlain and Earl Marshal, along with ninety peers elected by other hereditaries—being retained temporarily until the completion of the reforms.
Life peers created under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act are known as "lords of Appeal in Ordinary." They perform the judicial functions of the House of Lords and serve on the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.
Peers of Scotland and Ireland were not all members of the House of Lords; rather, they elected a limited number of representative peers from among their number (although all Scottish peers sat in the House between 1963 and 1999).
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/peerage   (1930 words)

  
 K-Zone law -- House of Lords: who needs it?   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Complaints that the House was not representative of the populace, and was a hazard to democracy, starting leading to proposals for its reform in the 19th century.
The House of Lords was abolished for a short time under the administration of Cromwell, but was eventually restored along with the monarchy.
A House of Lords without its anachronistic hereditary element and a greater proportion of life peers has a greater measure of popular support and legitimacy, and is more willing to assert itself.
www.kevinboone.com /lords.html   (5278 words)

  
 LORDS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Peer, peerage; house of lords, house of peers; lords, lords temporal and spiritual; noblesse; noble, nobleman; lord, lordling; grandee, magnifico, hidalgo; daimio, daimyo, samurai, shizoku; don, donship; aristocrat, swell, three-tailed bashaw; gentleman, squire, squireen, patrician, laureate.
The Appellate Committee of the House of Lords (which consists of senior judges and is functionally distinct from the legislative arm) is the final court of appeal.
Hogerhuis (House of Lords, Upper House), gevlekte aronskelk (cuckoo-pint, Jack-in-the-pulpit, lords and ladies), Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal (House of Lords), E.K. (House of Lords).
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/LORDS   (4419 words)

  
 House of Lords - Percy (AP) (Apellant) v. Church of Scotland Board of National Mission (Respondent) (Scotland)
The appeal tribunal held that the case concerned the disciplining of a minister with regard to her living and that was a matter spiritual governed by article IV in the Schedule to the 1921 Act.
Lord Atkin suggested, at page 564, that 'office' implies a subsisting, permanent, substantive position having an existence independent of the person who fills it, and which goes on and is filled in succession by successive holders.
I am sure Lord Atkin would have been the first to recognise that a difficulty with this general description is that it is wide enough to embrace cases where the relationship between the parties is essentially contractual.
www.publications.parliament.uk /pa/ld200506/ldjudgmt/jd051215/percy-1.htm   (2857 words)

  
 List of Lords of Appeal in Ordinary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As of 1 May 2005, Lords of Appeal in Ordinary in order of seniority:
The Lord Bingham of Cornhill, KG, PC (Senior Lord of Appeal in Ordinary)
The Lord Nicholls of Birkenhead, PC (Second Senior Lord of Appeal in Ordinary)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_Lords_of_Appeal_in_Ordinary   (87 words)

  
 Judicature Act 1873   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Finally, when it became clear that the English legal profession was firmly opposed to the reform proposals, the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 removed the provisions for the abolition of the judicial functions of the House of Lords, although it retained the provisions that established the High Court and the Court of Appeal.
Some have also expressed concerns that the judicial functions of the House of Lords may violate the European Convention of Human Rights[?], since the Law Lords can participate in framing legislation, and as such may not be an "an independent and impartial tribunal" under article 6 of that Convention.
The House of Lords may increasingly have a competitor for itself in the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.
www.eurofreehost.com /ju/Judicature_Act_1873.html   (408 words)

  
 PlanetPapers - Should there be a House of Lords?   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The House of Lords plays an important part in revising legislation (58% of the time in session is spend revising legislation) and keeping a check on Government by scrutinising its activities (38% of the time in session is spent doing that).
Unlike the House of Commons, the House of Lords does not have a certain timetable (known as a guillotine) so peers can discuss important issues in more detail than in the House of Commons, although peers normally try to keep to a fifteen-minute time limit for their speeches.
The House of Lords is the highest court of appeal within the United Kingdom.
www.planetpapers.com /Assets/3958.php   (1407 words)

  
 Law: Judicial Committee of the House of Lords   (Site not responding. Last check: )
All members of the House of Lords who have served as senior judges, including former Lords of Appeal in Ordinary and former Lord Chancellors, are Lords of Appeal and can be called upon to help with judicial business until they reach the age of 75.
The Law Lords are the highest court in England, but they have traditionally had no power to declare laws invalid or unconstitutional, as do supreme courts elsewhere, though the under British constitutional law principles they could declare a law to be inoperable as being contrary to the laws of the land.
The senior judge is the Lord Chancellor who is also head of the House of Lords and a minister in the government — it is powerful constitutional position.
hiv-aids.biz /Law/Judicial_Committee.shtml   (486 words)

  
 UK Parliament - Lords Information Office Briefing Papers List
The illustrated 'The work of the House of Lords' describes the work of the House with examples drawn from the previous session.
The current edition of 'The work of the House of Lords' is also available in Braille.
The House of Lords Information Office also produces an illustrated Brief Guide to the House of Lords with foreign language versions, and issues press notices.
www.parliament.uk /directories/house_of_lords_information_office/bplist.cfm   (172 words)

  
 Middlesex Guildhall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is designated to be the building for the future Supreme Court of the United Kingdom as created by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, which will be made up of the Law Lords, who currently carry out the judicial functions of the House of Lords.
The building is to be renovated according to plans by Lord Foster of Thames Bank.
The bulk of the current building was built between 1906 and 1913, designed by J S Gibson, in what Pevsner termed an art nouveau gothic theme, and decorated with Mediæval-looking gargoyles and other architectural sculptures, some by Henry Charles Fehr.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Middlesex_Guildhall   (179 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Politics | Tories hail lord chancellor vote
A vote in the House of Lords on Tuesday saw peers back a Tory amendment to the Constitutional Affairs Bill by 240 to 208 leading to a government defeat.
The lord chancellor is the country's senior judge, a government minister and speaker of the House of Lords.
The bill had proposed his jobs be split between a cabinet minister for the constitution, a more powerful lord chief justice and speaker in the House of Lords.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/uk_politics/3892175.stm   (481 words)

  
 House of Lords: 3D View of the Web   (Site not responding. Last check: )
See live article   House of Lords Act 1999 The House of Lords Act 1999, an Act of Parliament passed by the British Parliament, was a major constitutional enactment as it completely reformed one of the chambers of Parliament, the House of Lords.
Design of the new building Image:Hoflentrance-thumbnail.jpg The Irish House of Lords entrance to the Parliament House (east view) The House of Lords entrance, which was part of an extension to the original building, was designed by renowned architect James Gandon larger...
House of Lords Judgments - House of Lords Judgments Judgments of the House of Lords delivered since 14 November 1996 published by the court itself.
www.resolve3d.com /Arts/Music/Styles/Rock/HeavyMetal/HairMetal/BandsandArtists/HouseofLords   (987 words)

  
 Two letters to the Times
Sir, If leaks from Lord Wakeham's royal commission (report, November 1) are accurate, we are in danger of once again missing vital opportunities for modernising the second chamber of our Parliament and for removing some of its most obvious anomalies.
Justice would be served by unscrambling the judicial functions of the House of Lords from its legislative functions and setting up instead a supreme court headed by a judge who is manifestly and institutionally independent of government and legislature.
The supremacy of the House of Commons can be safeguarded by the limits on the second chamber’s powers, not by a blatantly undemocratic system of appointing its members.
www.barder.com /brian/1pointofview/lordslttrs.htm   (483 words)

  
 THE HOUSE OF LORDS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Consider that the House of Lords Bill, which was passed by the HOC and introduced in the HOL on 17 March 1999, stipulates that: No-one shall be a member of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage.
New Powers and Functions of the NSC: Concerning the powers to be given to the new or reformed second chamber, we also applaud its recommendations which endorse the tradition of a primarily consultative upper house with limited direct legislative powers that leave the HOC with the primary legislative role in the constitution.
These functions would not be changed, but the existing Law Lords should invite Members representing un(der)represented regions and communities to join them in any proceedings that involve such communities or issues, particularly where human rights are involved.
www2.hawaii.edu /~fredr/lords.htm   (13613 words)

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