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Topic: Julian calendar


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  History & info - the Christian calendar (Julian)
The "Christian calendar" is the term traditionally used to designate the calendar commonly in use, although it originated in pre-Christian Rome.
The Julian calendar was introduced by Julius Caesar (bust at right) in 45 B.C.E. Author David Duncan says the Julian calendar was born of Caesar's tryst with Cleopatra.
Before the Julian calendar was introduced, priests in the Roman Empire exploited the calendar for political ends, inserting days and even months into the calendar to keep the politicians they favored in office.
webexhibits.org /calendars/calendar-christian.html   (2203 words)

  
  Julian Calendar
The Julian calendar was in general use in Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar, which was soon adopted by most Catholic countries.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' but occurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar), in 1917, while Greece continued to use it until 1923.
A revised Julian calendar was proposed during a synod in Constantinople in May of 1923, consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part which calculated Easter astronomically at Jerusalem.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/j/ju/julian_calendar.html   (2618 words)

  
  Julian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and took force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita).
The Julian calendar was in general use in Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar, which was soon adopted by most Catholic countries.
A revised Julian calendar was proposed during a synod in Constantinople in May of 1923, consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part which calculated Easter astronomically at Jerusalem.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Julian_calendar   (2657 words)

  
 Revised Julian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Revised Julian calendar is a calendar scheme, originated in 1923, which effectively discontinued the 340 years of divergence between the naming of dates sanctioned by those Eastern Orthodox churches adopting it and the Gregorian calendar scheme that has come to predominate worldwide.
The term "Revised Julian" is informative primarily in describing the fact that it replaces the de facto Orthodox endorsement of the Julian scheme, and has the effect of avoiding any implicit recognition of Pope Gregory XIII's promulgation of a system with the same goals and general approach in the Gregorian reform of 1582.
The Revised Julian calendar was adopted by the Orthodox Churches of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Greece, Cyprus, Romania, Poland, and Bulgaria (the last in 1963), called the New calendarists.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Revised_Julian_calendar   (706 words)

  
 Julian calendar - Simple English Wikipedia
The Julian calendar is a calendar that was first used by Julius Caesar in the year 46 BC.
The calendar was still used by some countries even in the 20th century and is still used by many national Orthodox churches.
In the 16th century, the Gregorian calendar reform was introduced because it was more accurate in regards to the vernal equinox (where spring starts in the Northern Hemisphere and fall starts in the Southern Hemisphere) and for Easter.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Julian_calendar   (219 words)

  
 Calendar Converter
The Gregorian calendar was proclaimed by Pope Gregory XIII and took effect in most Catholic states in 1582, in which October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar, correcting for the accumulated discrepancy between the Julian calendar and the equinox as of that date.
The Julian calendar was proclaimed by Julius Cæsar in 46 B.C. and underwent several modifications before reaching its final form in 8 C.E. The Julian calendar differs from the Gregorian only in the determination of leap years, lacking the correction for years divisible by 100 and 400 in the Gregorian calendar.
The Bahá'í calendar is a solar calendar organised as a hierarchy of cycles, each of length 19, commemorating the 19 year period between the 1844 proclamation of the Báb in Shiraz and the revelation by Bahá'u'lláh in 1863.
www.fourmilab.ch /documents/calendar   (5200 words)

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