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Topic: Kanishka III


  
  Kushan Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The rule of Kanishka I, the second great Kushan emperor, fifth Kushan king, who flourished for at least 28 years from c. 127, was administered from two capitals: Purushapura (now Peshawar in northern Pakistan) and Mathura, in northern India.
According to the Rabatak inscription, Kanishka was the son of Vima Kadphises, the grandson of Vima Taktu, and the great-grandson of Kujula Kadphises.
Kanishka's ruling period is disputed, which will affects the ruling period of other rulers as well, since accession of Kanishka was believed to be in c. 78, which is believed to be the basis of official Saka calendar of India.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kushan   (1781 words)

  
 kushan empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The rule of Kanishka I, the third Kushan emperor, who flourished from the late 1st to the early/mid-2nd century AD, was administered from two capitals: Purushapura (now Peshawar in northern Pakistan) and Mathura, in northern India.
Kanishka also had the original Gandhari vernacular, or Prakrit, Mahayana Buddhist texts translated into the high litterary language of Sanskrit.
Along with the Indian king Ashoka, the Indo-Greek king Menander I (Milinda), and Harshavardhan, Kanishka is considered by Buddhism as one of its greatest benefactors.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /kushan_empire.html   (726 words)

  
 Kushan Empire - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Kanishka is renowed in Buddhist tradition for having convened a great Buddhist council in Kashmir.
Kanishka also had the original Gandhari vernacular, or Prakrit, Mahayana Buddhist texts translated into the high literary language of Sanskrit.
In the middle of the 2nd century, the Kushan empire under king Kanishka expanded into Central Asia and went as far as taking control of Kashgar, Khotan and Yarkand, which were Chinese dependencies in the Tarim Basin, modern Xinjiang.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /kushan.htm   (1019 words)

  
 Kushan Empire - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Gold coin of Kushan emperor Kanishka I (c.
The rule of Kanishka I, the third Kushan emperor, who flourished from the late 1st to the early/mid-2nd century, was administered from two capitals: Purushapura (now Peshawar in northern Pakistan) and Mathura, in northern India.
The Kushans also had a summer capital in Bagram, where the "Begram Treasure", comprising works of art from Greece to China, has been found.
www.open-encyclopedia.com /Kushan_Empire   (768 words)

  
 KUSHAN EMPIRE FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Kanishka's ruling period is disputed, which will affects the ruling period of other rulers as well, since accession of Kanishka was believed to be in c.
Along with the Indian king Ashoka, the Indo-Greek king Menander_I (Milinda), and Harsha Vardhana, Kanishka is considered by Buddhism as one of its greatest benefactors.
Later, around 116 CE, the Kushans under Kanishka established a kingdom centered on Kashgar, also taking control of Khotan and Yarkand, which were Chinese dependencies in the Tarim_Basin, modern Xinjiang.
www.factagent.com /?req=kushan_empire   (1639 words)

  
 WI Romans conquer India   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Having understood what is happening, Vologases III exits from Ecbatana with the cavalry to take part in the battle, just in time to see the complete defeat and death on the field of Osroes.
Meanwhile in Parthia Vologases III rebuilds his army, thanks also to nomad Yueh-Chi allieds, which are definitely allowed to settle in the land of Bactriana (current northern Afganistan).
Kushan king Kanishka and parthian king Vologases III escape the capture and cross the Indus river, finding refuge in the most eastern kushan city of Mathura.
www.seriousliving.net /new-3552653-477.html   (2334 words)

  
 Brief Guide to Kushan History
It is this last group that are in the era of Kanishka.
The second table clearly shows that Kanishka initiated an era, one that was not used by the three Kushan kings who proceeded him.
However, if that were the case the rule of Vasishka overlaps with that of Kanishka and Huvishka, and it would be necessary to explain the inscription of Kanishka of year 41.
www.kushan.org /essays/chronology/secondcentury.htm   (816 words)

  
 kanishka_ii   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Heraios Kujulu Kapdphises Vima Takto Vima Kadphises Kanishka I Huvishka I Vasu Deva I Kanishka II Vashishka Kanishka III Vaskushana Vasu Deva II Shaka Xandesh Vashishka Vasu Deva III...
The position of Vasishka, as a successor of Kanishka II, the successor of Vasudeva I, as demonstrated from their coins, seems to many scholars to...
Decline Gold dinar of Kushan king Kanishka II (200 - 220) From the 3rd century the Kushan empire began to fragment.
kanishka_ii.networklive.org   (321 words)

  
 Kushan Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Gold coin of Kushan emperor Kanishka I (c.100-126 AD) with a Hellenistic representation of the Buddha, and the word "Boddo" in Greek script.
Gold dinar of Kushan king Kanishka II (200-220 AD)
From the 3rd century A.D. the Kushan empire began to fragment.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Kushan   (734 words)

  
 1000 A.D. Viking Tourny - Fanaticus Forum
Kanishka set up in a deadly battleline between the southmost woods and the huge woods, both flanks anchored in the bad going, with only his Bw General and one Blade out in the open.
Kanishka had a superb position, with an army that was frankly overmatched in any other situation.
Kanishka pulled his archers back, and ordered the Huscarles on his left to drive straight for the Saxon King.....back went hte Saxons, but there was no room, with huscarles on 3 sides the King and his thegns fell before the Viking swords.
www.fanaticus.org /boards/Forum11/HTML/000051.html   (5785 words)

  
 History of Kushans
Kanishka was a patron of Mahayana Buddhism and during his reign, a large number of Buddhist monasteries, sculptures were built in and around Gandhara region.
Mathura, the winter capital and Gandhara were two centres of art; Mathura developed it's distinct style of art whereas the Gandhara school was influenced by Greco-Roman philosophies and centred in depicting Buddha's images.
The Roman history records that ambassadors were sent to the court of Trajan (98-117 AD) by the Indian kings, but it is unclear whether it is by Vima or Kanishka.
prabhu.50g.com /kushana/kus_history.html   (779 words)

  
 History of Civilizations of Ventraol Asia:Volumes II and III
Most important is his conclusion that it is Kanishka the second who should be associated with Buddhist tradition throws a great deal of chronological work in doubt, if it is correct.
In 1960 a London conference was held on the date of Kanishka in the hope of providing the key date, which it was believed would allow the construction of a list of kings.
The matter is confused as Kanishka II has been suggested as the king of Buddhist tradition (Harmatta) and this has necessitated a revision of the later kings.
www.kushan.org /reviews/hcca.htm   (1699 words)

  
 HISTORY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
After Kanishka's death, the later Kushana kings did not show that much patronage to the monasteries.
It includes the reign of Kanishka also who belonged to the line of the Great Kushana dynasty, which had earlier migrated from the province of Kansu in the northwest of damp.
Kanishka III and Vasudeva II were the important rulers of this line.
www.peshawar1.com /htmls/history/takhtbhai.html   (2099 words)

  
 brief history of Bactria - world history   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
At its acme (ca100), under Kanishka, the greatest Kushan king, the Kushan empire might have embraced a vast territory from the upper Oxus (Amudarya) river to Varanasi (former Benares).
Kanishka is famous as the sponsor of the Fourth Buddhist Council held in Kasmir in which Mahayana doctrine was formalized.
It is from this source that Buddhism spread to central Asia and via the Silk Route to China and the rest of the Far East.
www.worldhistoryplus.com /b/bactria.html   (1098 words)

  
 Marijuana.Com Marijuana Seeds & Drug Test Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Greco-Buddhism, a fusion of hellenist and Buddhist cultural elements, that was to expand into central and northern Asia as Mahayana Buddhism.
Menander I (Milinda), and Harsha Vardhana, Kanishka is considered by Buddhism as one of its greatest benefactors.
Kanishka established a kingdom centered on Kashgar, also taking control of Khotan and Yarkand, which were Chinese dependencies in the Tarim Basin, modern
67.15.54.21 /wiki/Kushan   (1404 words)

  
 Brief Guide to Kushan History
The difference in weights between the two should not be exaggerated, as the copper coins are often struck only loosely to the standard in force, and this combined with wear can make assessing the exact standard very difficult.
It must have stopped by the time of Kanishka III (c.258 AD) when the gold coinage's purity fell dramatically and it could no longer have guaranteed the copper.
A trader could therefore gather old coins (of Wima, Kanishka, and early Huvishka), transport them outside of the empire, and exchange them on the basis of their intrinsic copper value, at a profit.
www.kushan.org /coins/huvishka/devaluation.htm   (1902 words)

  
 Kanishka   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Obv: "RAONANAO RAOKA NHRKI KORANO" (Kanishka the Kushan, King of Kings) in Greek script.
Kanishka II Kanishka II was one of the emperors of the Vasudeva I who is considered to be the last great Kushan emperor....
Kanishka III Kanishka III was a Kushan emperor 255 - 275 AD.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/kanishka.html   (59 words)

  
 Lohuizen de Leeuw and the 'dropped hundreds' theory
Unlike Lohuizen, he dated Kanishka to 115 AD (259) and he felt that the second sequence represented a new era (266) rather than a second century.
He also adds a number of inscriptions, including 4 of Kanishka, and 2 of Vasishka (though he leaves one inscription of Vasishka in the first sequence, claiming it represents a different king).
Puri's own table is very interesting because he takes all the inscriptions of Vasishka to be in the second sequence (probably simply unaware Rosenfield excludes the year 24 inscription), adds the year 41 inscription of Kanishka III and duplicates one of the inscriptions, year 14, for Kanishka II, from Rosenfield's list.
kushan.org /essays/chronology/lohuizenrosenfield.htm   (787 words)

  
 British Academy - After Alexander: Central Asia Before Islam: Abstract (Rtveladze)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The second period is characterized by the circulation of gold and bronze coins of a common coinage of Kushan rulers in the territory of Bactria – Tokharistan, beginning from the reign of Soter Megas (Vima Tokto) to Kanishka III inclusive.
From the time of the rule of Shapur I (241-262 A.D) imitation coins of Vasudeva I and Kanishka III circulated.
These are well illustrated, thanks to the hoard from Dalverzin tepe, which consisted of imitations of Kushan coins and drachms of Shapur I. The circulation of imitations and gold and bronze Kushano-Sasanian, Sasanian-Kushan coins of all Kushan-Shahs is typical of the second stage of this period.
www.britac.ac.uk /events/programmes/2004/abstracts/asia-rtveladze.html   (691 words)

  
 [No title]
Most of the coins minted by Kanishka II show image of seated goddess Ardochsho (Laxmi) on reverse.
It appears that 635.7 is the only coin of Kanishka II which depicts three-headed Shiva image.
The most profound aspect of the three-headed Shiva, the Maheshamurti, is in evidence at the Elephanta (Gharapuri) caves, built by the Rashtrakuta kings in the 6th century A.D. The three heads represent Shiva as Aghori, Ardhanarishvara and Mahayogi.
www.med.unc.edu /~nupam/thshiv.html   (4923 words)

  
 Coins, Art, and Chronology: Cribb page 2
Overstrikes and hoards place the Kushan kings Vasishka and Kanishka III, ruling about 120-141 years after the first year of Kanishka I (according to the Ara inscription), as a contemporary of the Sasanian conquest of the western parts of Kushan territory.
On the basis of this and related evidence, the reign of Kanishka III falls in the period c.
His coins are of two types, a main Gupta-style series copying features from the gold coins of the Kushan kings from Kanishka II to Vasudeva II and a Kushan-style issue of base-gold coins copying the design of the late Kushan issues of Shaka and Kipunadha.
www.grifterrec.com /y/cribb/ekk_cribb_02.html   (3204 words)

  
 Indian, Chinese, & Japanese Emperors
Kanishka is said to have been converted to Buddhism by the playwright Ashvaghosha.
Irene's reign gave Pope Leo III justification for crowning Charlemagne Roman Emperor, since neither believed that a woman could be a legitimate Roman ruler.
The Empress Wu's grandson Hsüan Tsung was the last great figure of the dynasty, also known as "Ming Huang," or the "Bright [or brilliant] Emperor." Unfortunately, Hsüan Tsung's long reign ended troubled by rebellion, which substantially impaired the strength of the state for the rest of the history of the dynasty.
www.friesian.com /sangoku.htm   (12029 words)

  
 World Affairs Board - Pakistan ,Two Nation Theory and a few lies
That Mathura was a capital of Kanishka of the Kushan Dynasty, is as you have said, a correct statement.
The rule of Kanishka, the third Kushan emperor who flourished from the late first to the early/mid-second century A.D., was administered from two capitals: Purushapura (now Peshawar) near the Khyber Pass, and Mathura in northern India.
Under Kanishka's rule, at the height of the dynasty, Kushan controlled a large territory ranging from the Aral Sea through areas that include present-day Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan into northern India as far east as Benares and as far south as Sanchi.
www.worldaffairsboard.com /showthread.php?t=3101&page=3   (3389 words)

  
 Bibliography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Cribb (1999): “The Early Kushan Kings: New Evidence for Chronology: Evidence from the Rabatak Inscription of Kanishka I.” By Joe Cribb.
And An Epitome of Part III of the author’s “The Languages and Races of Dardistan.” By G. Leitner.
Kanishka I and the Deccan (A Study in the Problem of Relationship), 1968.
depts.washington.edu /uwch/silkroad/texts/hhshu/bibliography.html   (3762 words)

  
 L'Inde antique
Tout le Nord Ouest de l'Inde actuelle est un ensemble de satrapies de l'empire Achéménide du grand roi Darius 1er (6ème siècle) à son successeur éloigné Darius III Codoman, qui est vaincu par Alexandre le Grand.
L'Inde du Nord reste morcelée à l'arrivée d'Alexandre III de Macédoine.
Le successeur de Kanishka, Huvishka continue son action, mais le déclin commence dès le suivant Vasu Deva.
perso.wanadoo.fr /miltiade/Indeantiq.htm   (1893 words)

  
 Kushan
Kanishka I, AE Didrachm or Half Unit, c.127/8-152, Kushan Kingdom, Kapisa
Kanishka I, AE Drachm or Quarter Unit, c.127/8-152, Kushan Kingdom
Kanishka I, AE Drachm or Quarter Unit, c.127/8-152, Kushan Kingdom, Kashmir
www.beastcoins.com /Kushan/Kushan.htm   (527 words)

  
 Malter Galleries Past Auctions
AR Scyphate Drachm in imitation of issues struck in the name of Philip III of Macedon.
P.M. COS III P.P., his laureate head rt.
COS III P.P., his bare-headed and draped bust rt.
www.maltergalleries.com /archives/auction04/nov2004/page1.html   (6340 words)

  
 Kanishka - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Kanishka   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Kanishka is not available in the Hutchinson encyclopedia.
You may also use the word browser links:
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Kanishka   (68 words)

  
 Civilization Fanatics' Forums - View Single Post - Full Kushan Civilization
The 4th king of the Kushan was the great one, his title was Hiaoy (king in Kushanid language), his name Kanishka, aka Great Kanishka I. Kanishka lived in the I century, defeat tribes as Citas and Partos and disseminate the Buddhism by central Asia.
In this kingdom, Kanishka I got many military victories and developed sciences and arts, it was the centre of the Golden Age of the Kushan Empire.
Because its locations among important Empires as Roma, Greece and China, the Kushan were important traders, but the same location that gave them these important status was the cause of them defeat, the borders of these bigger Empires could not stop grow up.
forums.civfanatics.com /showpost.php?p=1979243&postcount=1   (250 words)

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