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Topic: Karl Verner


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  Grimm's Law: Karl Verner
Karl Verner noted a seeming "problem" with the operation of Grimm's Law in the development of the Germanic languages, and postulated a solution, in reality merely a supplement to Grimm's Law that provides an important exception to the sound changes.
Through deductive reasoning, Verner showed that the Indo-European placement of stress was the deciding factor in this development: if the immediately preceding syllable did not bear primary stress, then the alternate forms (the voiced versions) were produced.
All Germanic languages are thought to be descended from a hypothetical Proto-Germanic, united by their having been subjected to the sound shifts of Grimm's law and Verner's law.
www.lycos.com /info/grimms-law--karl-verner.html   (330 words)

  
  VERNER'S LAW,
Verner's law describes a regular shift in stress that took place in words in the Germanic languages after the consonant shift postulated by Grimm.
Verner observed that this was true when the accent fell on the root syllable, but when the accent fell on another syllable, ancient Indo-European p, t, and k became Germanic b, d, and g.
Verner's law states that with respect to the Germanic languages, the medial and final fricatives were voiced if they came after an unaccented syllable in the Indo-European parent language.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=225125   (660 words)

  
 Ortregister (. - A)
Abbeshults backstuga, Vrå (G) Isaksson Sedig, Karl (1756-1820)
Annertsad (G) Persson Lundal Oro Otterdal, Karl (1699-1735)
Kärringe soldat., Angelstad (G) Karlsson, Karl Johan (1846-1862)
www.ljungbykompani.se /4-1.htm   (346 words)

  
 Karl Adolf Verner - Encyclopedia.com
Verner was a librarian at the Univ. of Halle (now in E Germany) and a professor of Slavonic languages at the Univ. of Copenhagen.
His fame rests on Verner's law, a linguistic formulation showing that certain consonantal alternations in Germanic languages are the result of patterns of alternation in the position of word accent in the parent language.
On page 136, a paragraph is devoted to Verner's Law (with one example); on page 377, we are again...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Verner-K.html   (249 words)

  
  Verner's law
Verner's law, stated by Karl Verner in 1875, describes a historical sound change in the proto-Germanic language whereby voiceless fricatives *f, *T, *s and *x, when immediately following an unstressed syllable in the same word, underwent voicing and became respectively *b, *d, *z and *g.
Karl Verner was the first scholar who put his finger on the factor governing the distribution of the two outcomes.
It is worth noting that the Verner's Law comes chronologically after Grimm's Law (because Grimm's Law provides most of its input) and before the Germanic shift of stress to the initial syllable (because the voicing is conditioned by the old location of stress).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ve/Verner's_law.html   (672 words)

  
 Verner's Law
Verner noticed that a great number of exceptions to Grimm's Law also had a regularity and system of their own, and could be explained logically as well.
Verner concluded the changes described by Rask and Grimm occurred in early Germanic times, and then another set of consonant shifts occurred later caused by stress patterns.
Verner published his results in 1875, and the patterns he described came to be known as Verner's Law.
homepage.mac.com /ebranscomb/courses/HEL/Verner.html   (417 words)

  
 Verner's law Information
Verner's law, stated by Karl Verner in 1875, describes a historical sound change in the Proto-Germanic language whereby voiceless fricatives *f, *รพ, *s and *x, when immediately following an unstressed syllable in the same word, underwent voicing and became respectively *b, *d, *z and *g.
It is worth noting that the Verner's Law comes chronologically before the Germanic shift of stress to the initial syllable (because the voicing is conditioned by the old location of stress).
Karl Verner published his discovery in the article "Eine Ausnahme der ersten Lautverschiebung" (an exception to the first consonant shift) in Kuhns Zeitschrift in 1876, but he had presented his theory already on 1 May, 1875 in a comprehensive personal letter to his friend and mentor, Vilhelm Thomsen.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Verner's_law   (812 words)

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