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Topic: Karma in Hinduism


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  Karma - Dharma - Hinduism - Buddhism - Nirvana - Samadhi - Vedas - Haryana Online - India
Hinduism sees karma as immutable law with involuntary and voluntary acts being part of a more intricate system of cause and effect that is often not comprehensible to one bound by karma.
To the Hindu, karma is the law of the phenomenal cosmos that is part and parcel of living within the dimensions of time and space.
However, in light of the Hindu philosophical school of Vedanta, as well as Gautama Buddha's teachings, one is advised to either avoid, control or become mindful of the effects of desires and aversions as a way to moderate or change one's karma (or, more accurately, one's karmic results).
www.haryana-online.com /Culture/karma.htm   (1895 words)

  
  Hinduism - MSN Encarta
According to Hinduism, however, this current life is merely one link in a chain of lives that extends far into the past and projects far into the future.
Hinduism takes a comprehensive view of our human condition and has classified all the things we seek in the world and beyond into four broad categories: kāma, artha, dharma, and moksha.
Thus, Hindus consider that birth as a human being is a unique and valuable opportunity for seeking moksha, an opportunity that should not be wasted.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761555715_3/Hinduism.html   (1224 words)

  
  Karma - Deistpedia, the Deist encyclopedia
Karma literally means "deed" or "act" and more broadly names the universal principle of cause and effect, action and reaction which governs all life.
Karma is related to the notion of Buddhist rebirth - sometimes understood to be the same thing as reincarnation - which has its roots in the principle of Karma.
However, in light of the Hindu philosophical school of Vedanta, as well as Gautama Buddha's teachings, one is advised to either avoid, control or become mindful of the effects of desires and aversions as a way to moderate or change one's karma (or, more accurately, one's karmic results).
www.templeofreason.org /test7/Karma.htm   (1533 words)

  
 New age / karma
Karma (Sanskrit: कर्म from the root kri, "to do", meaning deed) or Kamma (Pali: meaning action, effect, destiny) is a term in several eastern religions that comprises the entire cycle of cause and effect.
Karma in Hinduism differs from karma in Buddhism and Jainism, and involves the role of God.
However, in light of the Hindu philosophical school of Vedanta, as well as Gautama Buddha's teachings, one is advised to either avoid, control or become mindful of the effects of desires and aversions as a way to moderate or change one's karma (or, more accurately, one's karmic results).
www.new-age-guide.com /new_age/karma.htm   (1476 words)

  
 Karma - HinduWiki
Karma simply deals with what is. The effects of all deeds actively create past, present and future experiences, thus making one responsible for one's own life, and the pain and joy it brings to others.
The "Law of Karma" is central in Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Jainism (religions born in India and Nepal).
Karma is categorized within the group or groups of cause (Pāli hetu) in the chain of cause and effect, where it consists of the elements volitional activities (Pali sankhara) and action (Pali bhava).
www.hinduwiki.com /index.php/Karma_in_Hinduism   (1171 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - karma, Hindu Religion (Hinduism) - Encyclopedia
The doctrine of karma states that one's state in this life is a result of actions (both physical and mental) in past incarnations, and action in this life can determine one's destiny in future incarnations.
Karma is a natural, impersonal law of moral cause and effect and has no connection with the idea of a supreme power that decrees punishment or forgiveness of sins.
Karma yoga (see yoga), the spiritual discipline of detachment from the results of action, is a famous teaching of the Bhagavad-Gita.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/K/karma.html   (226 words)

  
 Karma - Free Encyclopedia of Thelema
There are three types of karma, 1) sanchita karma, the sum total of past karmas yet to be resolved; 2) prarabdha karma, that portion of sanchita karma that is to be experienced in this life; and 3) kriyamana karma, the karma that humans are currently creating and will bear fruit in the future.
This samsaric karma comes in two 'flavours' - 'good' karma, which leads to positive/pleasurable experiences, like high rebirth (as a deva, asura, or human), and bad karma which leads to suffering and low rebirth (as a hell-sufferer, as a preta, or as an animal).
In Hinduism, however, God does play a role and is seen as a dispenser of karma; see Karma in Hinduism for more details.
www.egnu.org /thelema/index.php/Karma   (1248 words)

  
 Hinduism and Gods
Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion, following Christianity and Islam, and is one of the "Great" religions (meaning that Hinduism has spread from its original borders to other countries and cultures).
One has to understand that Hinduism is actually a very broad term used in the West to describe the different practices and beliefs of a large group of the people of India, and is thus a little misleading.
One well-known aspect of Hinduism is Karma, which is the accumulated sum of ones good and bad deeds and is directly related to samsara.
www.geocities.com /jayistheboss/hinduism.html   (1341 words)

  
 Karma
Karma or "Karm"(Sanskrit: कर्म from the root kri, "to do", meaning deed) or Kamma (Pali: meaning action, effect, destiny) is a term in several eastern religions that comprises the entire cycle of cause and effect.
Karma is related to the notion of Buddhist rebirth - sometimes understood to be the same thing as reincarnation - which has its roots in the principle of Karma.
This conception of karma handles the big problem with the more traditional view, because it explains why bad things happen to people who've done nothing "wrong"; it is due to the sort of energy they have sent into the universe with their thoughts and feelings, which exert as much power as actual actions.
www.psychicjive.com /karma.html   (1429 words)

  
 Karma
Karma (Sanskrit: कर्म), or Kamma (Pali) is a Sanskrit word and a concept of religions born in India, meaning 'action, effect, destiny.' In Hinduism
Karma literally means "deed" or "act" and more broadly names the universal principle of cause and effect, action and reaction which governs all life.
Karma is thought by some Jesuit theologians to be consistent with the doctrine of purgatory.
www.thaiexotictreasures.com /karma.html   (1139 words)

  
 Karma - Free Encyclopedia of Thelema
There are three types of karma, 1) sanchita karma, the sum total of past karmas yet to be resolved; 2) prarabdha karma, that portion of sanchita karma that is to be experienced in this life; and 3) kriyamana karma, the karma that humans are currently creating and will bear fruit in the future.
When Buddhists talk about karma, they are normally referring to karma/action that is 'tainted' with ignorance - karma that continues to ensure that the being remains in the everlasting cycle of samsara.
This samsaric karma comes in two 'flavours' - 'good' karma, which leads to positive/pleasurable experiences, like high rebirth (as a deva, asura, or human), and bad karma which leads to suffering and low rebirth (as a hell-sufferer, as a preta, or as an animal).
fet.egnu.org /wiki/Karma   (1247 words)

  
 Karma - Crystalinks
Karma is the concept of "action" or "deed" in Dharmic religions understood as denoting the entire cycle of cause and effect described in Hindu, Jain, Sikh and Buddhist philosophies.
Karma is categorized within the group or groups of cause (Pali hetu) in the chain of cause and effect, where it comprises the elements of "volitional activities" (Pali sankhara) and "action" (Pali bhava).
Karmas are attracted to the karmic field of a soul on account of vibrations created by activities of mind, speech and body as well as on account of various mental dispositions.
www.crystalinks.com /karma.html   (2646 words)

  
 Hinduism Today | Karma | October, November, December, 2002
The study of karma is effectively approached in a three-step process: 1) dispelling common misconceptions about karma; 2) acquiring a correct intellectual understanding of karma's key concepts; 3) managing your own karma by utilizing the correct understanding of karma to refine your actions and reactions in life.
Karma also refers to our individual karma that we carry from life to life, both the karma to be resolved in this life, and the karma to be resolved in a future life.
Thus, the karma we are born with is comprised of rewards and punishments from many past lives that have yet to manifest, and are yet to be resolved.
www.hinduismtoday.com /archives/2002/10-12/40-50_karma_management.shtml   (4876 words)

  
 Karma In Hinduism
This is the Hindu name for the idea that our actions influence the fate and actions of others in their future lives on earth- as well as affecting who we are, in our future reincarnations.
Hindus use the idea of karma to explain how they were born Hindus, and thus don’t need to search for truth nor have any conversion experience.
The Hindu idea of karma is actually very similar to the idea of total predestination which is pushed by some Calvinist Christians.
www.aletheiacollege.net /dbb/7-3-1karma_in_hinduism.htm   (1009 words)

  
 Karma; The Laws of Cause and Effect
Karma is the physical manifestation of the law of balance and harmony, as it applies to the results of decisions reached and attitudes held by beings capable of free will and choice.
Karma is, therefore, the need to experience, and to fill gaps in the understanding of the experiences gained.
Karma dictates that an individual is responsible for his current situation and future situation.
www.thenazareneway.com /karma.htm   (2647 words)

  
 Karma and Fairness in Life
In my opinion karma is a satisfactory answer to the question of fairness in life because it offers a means by which we may accept the unfairness and injustices in life without needing to understandwhy.
Karma is a completely satisfactory answer to the question "is life fair?" Your actions are the determination of youe life.
Hindus strive to make good moral judgements and decisions so that they can be released from the cycle of samsara and the pain that one endures in each life.
www.butte.cc.ca.us /~wmwu/inclass_essays/karma_and_fairness_in_life.htm   (1743 words)

  
 Saranam's Hinduism Discussion Forum - Karma & practical sacrifice   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The cooking of meals is karma sanyasa and sacrifice of fruit of your work which is meals is karmaphala tyaga.
Karma is energy and fruit of karma is matter.
Karma in the form of sacrifice of words, mind and intelligence as drinking water and the sacrifice of work as cooking and serving and sacrifice of fruit of work as meal is the five-fold path of karma to attain the divine grace.
www.saranam.com /forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=12   (255 words)

  
 karma
Karma is a law in Hinduism which maintains that every act done, no matter how insignificant, will eventually return to the doer with equal impact.
Karma is sometimes referred to as a "moral law of cause and effect." Karma is both an encouragement to do good and to avoid evil, as well as an explanation for whatever good or evil befalls a person.
Karma as understood by Van Praagh seems to make life trivial, a mere working out of a metaphysical "law" which reduces all humans to dehumanized creatures, devoid of morality and responsibility, mere causes and effects in a pointless system.
skepdic.com /karma.html   (687 words)

  
 Heart of Hinduism: The Law of Karma
Karma literally means "action," but more often refers to the accumulated reactions to activities.
Hindus don't eat meat because they think that they will then be reborn as an animal.
Karma entails understanding that we are all ultimately responsible for our own lives.
hinduism.iskcon.com /concepts/103.htm   (703 words)

  
 Karma In Hinduism
This is the Hindu name for the idea that our actions influence the fate and actions of others in their future lives on earth- as well as affecting who we are, in our future reincarnations.
Hindus use the idea of karma to explain how they were born Hindus, and thus don’t need to search for truth nor have any conversion experience.
The Hindu idea of karma is actually very similar to the idea of total predestination which is pushed by some Calvinist Christians.
www.carelinks.net /books/dh/dbb/7-3-1karma_in_hinduism.htm   (1009 words)

  
 Hinduism: reincarnation and karma
Hinduism has no definite date of origin, but it was practiced in the Indus Valley, as early as 4000 B.C. At that time however it was not a religion but rather a set of rules by which the Indus civilization governed themselves.
Hinduism teaches that this soul, inherit to all people inters the body at birth and leaves the body at death.
After the person dies and the soul leaves the body for the astral plane, the karma is tallied and, based on how "naughty or nice" one was during the last life, the soul is given a new body to incarnate.
www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us /History/India/save/Mfedor/Mfedor.html   (1116 words)

  
 Karma
Karma is based upon the phenomena of cause and effect which denotes both action and reaction that extend through many lifetimes.
There are three types of karma: "agent-karma" which is concerned with the present cause and effect, and will influence future lives; "prarabdha-karma" which had already been caused and is in the process of being effected; and, "sanchita-karma" which has been accumulated but has not yet been effected.
Karma is normally thought of as a term used by eastern religions such as previously mentioned.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/k/karma.html   (695 words)

  
 karma
Karma is a law in Hinduism which maintains that every act done, no matter how insignificant, will eventually return to the doer with equal impact.
Karma is sometimes referred to as a "moral law of cause and effect." Karma is both an encouragement to do good and to avoid evil, as well as an explanation for whatever good or evil befalls a person.
Karma as understood by Van Praagh seems to make life trivial, a mere working out of a metaphysical "law" which reduces all humans to dehumanized creatures, devoid of morality and responsibility, mere causes and effects in a pointless system.
www.skepdic.com /karma.html   (687 words)

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