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Topic: Kerait


  
  Don Croner's World Wide Wanders: Mongolia | Four Sacred Mountains of Ulaan Baatar
Although these were the lands thought to be occupied by the Kerait, their influence may have extended south of the Gobi-Altai Range the whole way across the Gobi Desert to the Great Wall of China.
It was the Keraits who aspired to hegemony in Mongolia, while the Mongols were a relatively small grouping of clans who spent a lot of time feuding among themselves.
The Kerait princess Sorkaktani, who became the wife of Chingis's youngest son Tolui (and thus the mother of Kublai Khan, founder of the Yuan Dynasty in China), was a Nestorian.
www.doncroner.com /Mongolia/Mountains/mountains.1.html   (3143 words)

  
  Kerait - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Kerait were part of the united Mongol nation forged by Genghis Khan in the first years of the 13th century AD.
An account of the conversion of the Kerait is given by the 13th century Jacobite historian Gregory Bar Hebraeus.
The Prester John legend was connected to the Christian rulers of the Kerait ("The history of this race of Christian kings, afterward so celebrated in Europe under the name of Prester John, is properly referable to the two succeeding centuries." (Asahel Grant, op.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kerait   (562 words)

  
 Genghis Khan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He was the eldest son of Yesükhei, a minor tribal chief of the Kiyad and a nöker (vassal) of Ong Khan of the Kerait tribe
Genghis' father, Yesugei, khan of the Borjigin and nephew to Ambaghai and Qutula Khan, emerged as the head of the ruling clan of the Mongols, but this position was contested by the rival Tayichi’ud clan, who descended directly from Ambaghai.
She was later kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temüjin rescued her with the help of his friend and future rival, Jamuka, and his protector, Ong Khan of the Kerait tribe.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Genghis_Khan   (9293 words)

  
 Genghis Khan - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
She was later kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temüjin rescued her with the help of his friend and future rival, Jamuka, and his protector, Wang Khan of the Kerait tribe.
Temüjin's ally was Toghrul, Khan of the Kerait and better known by the Chinese title Wang Khan which the Jin Empire granted him in 1197.
Toghrul allied himself with Jamuqa, Temüjin's blood brother, or anda, and when the confrontation took place, the internal divisions between Toghrul and Jamuqa, as well as the desertion of many clans that fought on their side to the cause of Temüjin, led to Toghrul's defeat.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Genghis_Khan   (7732 words)

  
 IcyBrian\'s RPG Fanfic Library :: Fanfic At Its Coolest
Kerait – for that was what the steed was called – had no equal among the horses of the region in beauty or swiftness; when he stretched his legs out and ran even the south wind was left behind.
The hunter was pulled off Kerait’s back and beaten severely, while the horse himself was roped and dragged away, still fighting like a wolf to free himself from their tethers and come to his master’s aid.
How Kerait had escaped his captors and made his way back to his master’s door with such grievous wounds none could say, but somehow he had, and it was there in the arms of the hunter that Kerait’s life quietly slipped away.
www.icybrian.com /fanfiction/viewstory.php?action=printable&textsize=0&sid=2033&chapter=all   (3696 words)

  
 Genghis Khan - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
His conquests, and his strategy of inducing fear by slaughtering the entire populations of resisting cities such as Merv and Herat, led to millions of deaths and, in the longer term, resulted in the large-scale depopulation of the areas of Eurasia that he had conquered [1].
Later she was kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temüjin called on his friend and later rival, Jamuka, and his protector, Wang Khan of the Kerait tribe, for aid and rescued her.
Genghis' father, Yesugei, khan of the Borjigin, and nephew to Ambaghai and Qutula Khan, emerged as the head of the ruling clan of the Mongols, but this position was contested by the rival Tayichi’ud clan, which descended directly from Ambaghai.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/g/e/n/Genghis_Khan_804b.html   (5115 words)

  
 Temuchin, the young Genghis Khan
In 1199, with Chin support and encouragement, the Keraits and their ally Temuchin inflicted a serious defeat on the overweening Tatars.
A Kerait ambush was betrayed and a furious battle was subsequently fought near the head-waters of the Khalka river.
The Khan himself was not quite so confident and had the Kerait clans distributed among the Mongol tribes, but at least there was no massacre.
home.tiscali.nl /~t543201/web-mongol/mongol-temuchin.htm   (1582 words)

  
 [No title]
In Carpini's (1248) single mention of Prester John as the king, great crosses made of gold and jewels were carried in wagons before him as his standards, and each was followed by 1o,000 knights and roo,000 footmen.
He mentions, however, a brother of this John called Unc who ruled over the Crit and Merkit (or Kerait and Mekrit, two of the great tribes of Mongolia), whose history he associates with that of Jenghiz Khan.
But this is a mistake; for in fact the application had begun much earlier, and probably long before the name had ceased to be attached by writers on Asia to the descendants of the king of the Kerait.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /correction/edit?content_id=54268&locale=en   (3507 words)

  
 Genghis Khan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Genghis' father, Yesükhei (khan of the Borjigin and nephew to Ambaghai and Qutula Khan) emerged as the head of the ruling clan of the Mongols, but this position was contested by the rival Tayichi’ud clan, who descended directly from Ambaghai.
She was later kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temüjin rescued her with the help of his friend and future rival, Jamuqa, and his protector, Ong Khan of the Kerait tribe.
Genghis refused to divide his troops into different units based on ethnicity, instead he mixed tribesmen from conquered groups, like the Tatars and Keraits, which fostered a sense of unity and loyalty by reducing the effects of the old tribal affiliations and preventing any one unit from developing a separate ethnic or national character.
www.stupidproxy.com /index.php?q=aHR0cDovL2VuLndpa2lwZWRpYS5vcmcvd2lraS9HZW5naGlzX0toYW4=   (6618 words)

  
 Genghis Khan
His conquests, and his strategy of inducing fear by slaughtering the entire populations of resisting cities such as Merv and Herat, led to millions of deaths and, in the longer term, resulted in the large-scale depopulation of the areas of Eurasia that he had conquered.
Later she was kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temujin called on his friend and later rival, Jamuka, and his protector, Wang Khan of the Kerait tribe, for aid and rescued her.
Genghis's ally was Toghril, Khan of the Kerait and better known by the Chinese title Wang Khan which the Jin Empire granted him in 1197.
www.archira.com /kahn.html   (2924 words)

  
 PRESTER JOHN - LoveToKnow Article on PRESTER JOHN   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
In the narrative of William Rubruquis (1253), though distinct reference is made to the conquering Gur Khan under the name of Coir Cham of Caracatay, the title of King John is assigned to Kushluk, king of the Naimans, who had married the daughter of the last lineal representative of the gur khans.
This Unc was in fact the prince of the Kerait, called by the Chinese Tuli, and by the Persian historians of the Mongols Toghr~I, on whom the Kin emperor of north China had conferred the title of wang or king, whence his coming to be known as Awang or Ung Khan.
But this is a mistake; for in fact the application had begun much earlier, and probably long before the name had ceased to be attached by writers on Asia to the descendants of the king of the Kerait.
70.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PR/PRESTER_JOHN.htm   (4752 words)

  
 Savitri Devi — The Lightning and the Sun — Chapter 5
In the meantime, he let the Kerait chief be “Wang Khan” — “the prince” — and entirely devoted himself to the organisation of, his warriors and of his increasingly numerous ordu.
And in the prosperous Kerait settlements — half camps and half markets, — the merchants were grateful to “Wang Khan” for the alliance he had made.
Those of the Kerait Turks who were not slain in battle were incorporated into Temujin’s confederation of tribes under Mongol overlordship.
www.savitridevi.org /lightning-05.html   (7331 words)

  
 Jamuqa - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Jamuqa was a Mongol military and political leader and the chief rival to Temüjin, later Genghis Khan, in the unification of the Mongol tribes.
Born in the Jadirat, a sub-tribe of the Kerait, Jamuqa was a childhood friend and anda, blood brother, to Temüjin.
When Borte was abducted by the Merkit tribe, Wang Khan, Jamuqa and Temüjin combined forces against the Merkits to recover her.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Jamuqa   (323 words)

  
 Mongols   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Presently this covers: the Golden Horde, the Jadirat, the Keraits, the Khalka, the Merkits, Mongolia, the Naimans, the Nogai, the Ordos, the Qaidu, Qara Khitai, the Sechen, Sibir (the White Horde), the Tatar, the Tumed, T'umen', and the Tushtietu.
Others were the Merkits, the Keraits, the Khitai, the Naimans, the Qaidu, and the Tatars.
Owing to internecine feuding, the Mongol tribe was decimated at the end of the 12th century; it was left to the genius of Temujin Genghis to restore the fortunes of his people, and unify his nation...
www.hostkingdom.net /mongols.html   (1736 words)

  
 5. The Mongol Conquest Of China Page 2
The discomfiture of Chamuka has been referred to, but he had not abandoned the hope of success, and when he succeeded in detaching the Kerait chief, Wang Khan, from the Mongols, to whom he was bound by ties of gratitude, he fancied that he again held victory in his grasp.
Such was the superiority in numbers of the Kerait, that in the first battle of this long and keenly- contested struggle, Wang Khan defeated Temujin near Ourga, where the mounds that cover the slain are still shown to the curious or skeptical visitor.
The death of Wang Khan signified nothing less than the wholesale defection of the Kerait tribe, which joined Genghis to the last man. Then Genghis turned westward to settle the question of supremacy with the Naimans, who were both hostile and defiant.
www.web-books.com /Classics/Nonfiction/History/China/ChinaC6P2.htm   (877 words)

  
 East of the Euphrates: Early Christianity in Asia
An account of the conversion of the Keraits is given by the thirteenth century Jacobite historian Gregory Bar Hebraeus.
The Keraits organized themselves into a confederation and thus influenced the political organization among the later Mongols.
It was the Keraits who patronized and helped the growth of Temujin who later became the Chengis Khan (1162-1227) of the Mongols.
www.religion-online.org /showchapter.asp?title=1553&C=1362   (2835 words)

  
 Great Steppe Empires of Asia
Temudjin who was to become Genghis Khan was born in 1155 on the Onon, a tributary of the Amur which forms the northeast border of China with Russia today.
Made an orphan at 12, his formative years were spent in extreme poverty and hardship which he overcame with the help of his brother Qassar.
At 20 he married a clan chief's daughter, Borte, and became the vassal of the Kerait king, Togrul who later helped him rescue his wife from the Markit tribe that had kidnapped her.
berclo.net /page97/97en-steppe-empires.html   (2064 words)

  
 Guy Fawkes Night - Bonfire Night - Ghengis Fireworks
Genghis' father, Yesugei, khan of the Borjigin and nephew to Ambaghai and Qutula Khan, emerged as the head of the ruling clan of the Mongols, but this position was contested by the rival Tayichi’ud clan, who descended directly from Ambaghai.
She was later kidnapped in a raid by the Merkit tribe, and Temüjin rescued her with the help of his friend and future rival, Jamuka, and his protector, Ong Khan of the Kerait tribe.
Alhough the campaign was successful and led to the recapture of Borte and utter defeat of the Merkits, it also paved the way for the split between the childhood friends, Temüjin and Jamuka.
www.ghengisfireworks.co.uk /information_about_gengis_khan.asp   (8236 words)

  
 All Empires History Forum: Mongol Empires
An account of the conversion of the Keraits is given by the thirteenth century Jacobite historian Gregory Bar Hebraeus.
Paul Ratchnevsky emphasized the amicableness between the Keraits and West Khitans as exemplified by the fact that Kerait's khan, Toghrul, had once sought refuge in Western Liao.
The importance of Keraits would lie in the fact that Genghis Khan sought the protection under Toghrul and their alliance laid the foundation for the uprise of the Mongols.
www.allempires.com /forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=5530   (2332 words)

  
 Mongols
He led his clan to unify the others into a literal military juggernaut that swept across the Asian continent and reached the fringes of Europe and the Holy Roman Empire.
The Mongols were originally a confederation of tribes in competition with the Tatar Turks, Kerait, Merkit and Naiman confederations and therefore only one division of what is known today as the Mongol nation.
Genghis Khan unified the Mongol people by absorbing the other confederations into his own and the word Mongol came to mean the entire people.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Mongols   (4113 words)

  
 Department of Asian Pacific Studies, San Diego State University
In alliance with the Kerait and with the support of the Jin, Temujin defeated one rival tribe after another and all but annihilated the Tatars.
Within two years after he broke the Mongol alliance with the Kerait, his armies suffered a tremendous defeat in a Kerait ambush near the headwaters of the Khalka River.
The defeated Kerait people submitted to Genghis Khan's leadership and became his loyal servants, but he was never sure of their loyalty and disbursed them among the Mongol tribes.
www-rohan.sdsu.edu /~aps1/graphics/101_Mongols.htm   (12050 words)

  
 Gengis Khan
After the slaughtering of Bektair, Temujin was given an army that lacked strength and organization.
There was no "Mongol Nation." Many enemies lingered in the distance like the Tartars in the east and the Keraits in the west.
The Keraits fought for three long days before surrendering to the Mongols.
www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us /History/China/02/Dgibbs/Dgibbs.htm   (1080 words)

  
 Don Croner's World Wide Wanders-Blog
The upper basins of these three rivers—the Tuul, the Onon, and Kherlen—located at the navel of northern Asia, at the headwaters of two of the world’s greatest river systems, are known collectively as the “Three Rivers Region,” an area believed to be the homeland of the Mongol People.
In the twelfth century the middle Tuul, here in the vicinity of Ulaan Baatar, was also the headquarters of the Kerait tribe, whose chieftain, Tooril, was the original patron of Chingis Khan.
The Kerait too at times suffered from disunity, however, and Tooril himself became embroiled in a vicious civil war with his uncle Gur-khan for control of the Kerait throne.
www.doncroner.com /2004/01/during-one-four-month-stay-in-ulaan.html   (8526 words)

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