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Topic: Khmer Republic


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  Chronology of Cambodian History, 1975-1979
Khmer Rouge captured the capital Phnom Penh and began the evacuation of its inhabitants.
Khmer Rouge Standing Committee met to discuss announcement of the election due to be held on March 20, 1976 and the monitoring of news.
Khmer Rouge soldiers kill 28 Thai civilians and one policeman in an attack on Ta Phraya district of Thailand.
www.geocities.com /khmerchronology/1975.htm   (5673 words)

  
 Khmer Institute   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-04)
The Khmer Rouge strategy to reach their goal was by removing people from areas and converting the entire population into agricultural laborers.
Tortures used by the Khmer Rouge included poking chopsticks in the ears, beatings with bamboo sticks, cutting off of fingertips, burning, isolation, starvation, rape, assault, hanging by the feet, children swung by the feet and smashed against trees, and witnessing beatings or killing of their parents or loved ones.
Khmer parents exert almost full authority over their children, especially when training moral behavior and to prevent loss of face in the community.
www.khmerinstitute.org /research/thesis1/t1c.html   (6807 words)

  
 Untangling Cambodian History: The Banyan Tree
To the Khmer Rouge, the increased bombing was the result of a betrayal by the North Vietnamese: the Vietnamese had bought a reprieve for themselves by sacrificing their allies.
The Khmer Rouge were rumored to be even more savage; tales from villages captured by the communists spoke of old women being nailed to the walls of their houses and burned alive, of children being torn limb from limb.
By 1975, the situation for the Khmer Republic was clearly hopeless.
www.mekong.net /cambodia/banyan2.htm   (1115 words)

  
 Pol Pot killer file
The Khmer Rouge receive military aid and training from the North Vietnamese and support from China and are quickly transformed into an effective fighting force, expanding from a small guerilla outfit of less than 5,000 to an army of 100,000 in a matter of months.
By 1973 the Khmer Rouge are able to launch independent and successful attacks against the Khmer Republic troops, taking control of nearly 60% of Cambodia's territory and 25% of its population.
Khmer Rouge records from the Tuol Sleng interrogation and detention centre in Phnom Penh (also known as S-21) show that 14,499 "antiparty elements", including men women and children, are tortured and executed from 1975 to the first six months of 1978.
www.moreorless.au.com /killers/pot.html   (4801 words)

  
 New Page 1
Son Sann was the leader of the republican-inclined Khmer People's National Liberation Front (KPNLF) which was established in October 1979 in opposition to the Khmer Rouge and the incumbent People's Republic of Kampuchea (PRK).
Son Sann helped found a guerrilla resistance force, the Khmer People's National Liberation Front in 1979 at the Thai-Cambodian border and fought both the Khmer Rouge and the Vietnamese army that occupied Cambodia from 1979 to 1989.
Khmer People's National Liberation Armed Forces, also known as the Khmer People's National Liberation Army (not to be confused with the Khmer People's Liberation Army, the opposition forces organized by the Vietnamese Viet Minh at the end of World War II).
www.khmerkampongspeu.org /sonsann.htm   (3134 words)

  
 Cambodian Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It spread rapidly from Battambang to the southern and to the southwestern provinces of Pouthisat (Pursat), Kampong Chhnang, Kampong Cham, Kampong Speu, Kampot, and the central province of Kampong Thom.
The Khmer Loeu regions of Mondulkiri Province and Ratanakiri Province fell almost entirely under KCP (Kampuchean Communist Party) control by the end of the decade.
In the prince's words, this front would embrace "all Khmer both inside and outside the country-- including the faithful, religious people, military men, civilians, and men and women who cherish the ideals of independence, democracy, neutrality, progressivism, socialism, Buddhism, nationalism, territorial integrity, and anti-imperialism." In practice, there was no united front.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Khmer_Republic   (2784 words)

  
 Yale > Cambodian Genocide Project >The Khmer Rouge regime
The Khmer Rouge subsequently established the state of Democratic Kampuchea, and instituted what was arguably the most radical experiment in social engineering of the twentieth century.
One of the conceits of the Khmer Rouge Party Center was that Democratic Kampuchea was capable of seizing through military conquest regions of present-day Vietnam which were lost to Cambodian control through Vietnamese expansion over the last five hundred years.
Today, however, some seventeen years and three Cambodian regimes later, the "National Army of Democratic Kampuchea," as the Khmer Rouge military is known, continues to wage warfare from jungle redouts in an attempt to regain control of Cambodia and resume their utopian experiment.
www.yale.edu /cgp/kr.html   (565 words)

  
 Cambodia Demographics and Geography - Columbia Gazetteer of the World Online
The heart of the country is a saucer-shaped, gently rolling alluvial plain drained by the Mekong River and shut off by mountain ranges; the Dangrek Mountains form the frontier with Thailand in the NW and the Cardamom and the Elephant Ranges are in the SW.
In the 6th century Khmers from the upstart Chen-la state to the N overran Funan.
The Khmer Rouge were estimated to control about 20% of Cambodian territory still, with strongholds in the N and W parts of the country (particularly at Anlong Veng, a village near the Thai border).
www.columbiagazetteer.org /public/Cambodia.html   (2083 words)

  
 Khmer Rouge Crimes
The Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia from April 17, 1975, to January 7, 1979, during which time an estimated 1.7 million people were executed or died from disease and starvation as a result of the regime’s policies.
Internal defections within the Khmer Rouge throughout the 1990s and the corresponding re-emergence of its members in Cambodian society presented the Cambodian government with the controversy of whether and how to prosecute former Khmer Rouge officials for crimes committed during the period of CPK rule.
It arrested Ta Mok, former Khmer Rouge military commander of the south-west region and member of the CPK Central Committee, on March 6, 1999, and Kaing Khek Iev, better known as Duch, the former Khmer Rouge chief of police, who directed the notorious prison and torture center at Tuol Sleng, on May 9, 1999.
www.wcl.american.edu /hrbrief/v7i1/khmer.htm   (2677 words)

  
 History of Cambodia
On October 9, the Cambodian monarchy was abolished, and the country was renamed the Khmer Republic.
The Khmer Republic's leadership was plagued by disunity among its members, the problems of transforming a 30,000-man army into a national combat force of more than 200,000 men, and spreading corruption.
It was composed of Khmer communists who had remained in Vietnam after 1975 and officials from the eastern sector--like Heng Samrin and Hun Sen--who had fled to Vietnam from Cambodia in 1978.
infotut.com /geography/Cambodia   (4472 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Khmer
Khmer Rouge KHMER ROUGE [Khmer Rouge], name given to native Cambodian Communists.
Khmer Rouge soldiers, aided by North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops, began a large-scale insurgency against government forces in 1970, quickly gaining control over more than two thirds of the country.
Return to the killing fields: the Khmer Rouge wants to rule Cambodia again, and its leaders are using the sword to get their way.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Khmer   (686 words)

  
 New Page 1
He ended the monarchy in Cambodia and in October 1970 established the short-lived Khmer Republic, which was superseded when the Khmer Rouge seized power in April 1975.
front would embrace "all Khmer both inside and outside the country-- including the faithful, religious people, military men, civilians, and men and women who cherish the ideals of independence, democracy, neutrality, progressivism, socialism, Buddhism, nationalism, territorial integrity, and anti-imperialism." A coalition, brokered by the Chinese, was hastily formed between the prince and the KCP.
The concept of a republic was not popular with most villagers, who had grown up with the idea that something was seriously awry in a Cambodia without a monarch.
www.khmerkampongspeu.org /lonnol.htm   (877 words)

  
 Auditing Report
The supporters of the U.S.-backed Khmer Republic sacrificed their lives in an effort to defend the regime and Cambodia’s independence, sovereignty, and territorial integrity, all of which had been repeatedly violated by the Vietcong, the North Vietnamese Army, and the communist Khmer Rouge, the latter with the support of the People's Republic of China.
Conversely, in liberated areas of the countryside, many Khmer citizens from among the majority of poor people sacrificed their lives by joining the NLAFK to free the country from what they perceived to be U.S. imperialists and their allies.
The Khmer envoys of two sides shook hands and agreed to carry out a general election under the supervision of the soon to be established UNTAC (United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia).
www.dccam.org /cambodia_social_study.htm   (4285 words)

  
 CARAWEB - THE KHMER MENTALITY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-04)
The Khmer fondness for boasting is also well-documented, for instance, in such ethical poems as "Father's Testament," "Rules for Children and Grandchildren," "Fable for Children and Grandchildren," and "Conduct Rules for Men." All these writings seek to awaken the Khmer people from their dreams of self-praise and irrational pride.
This is because the Khmer people live in a country in which the various seasons are not clear-cut: the rainy season and the dry season, as well as the cold season, start and end at fuzzy dates, known to no one.
The ninth element of the Khmer mentality is the sanctity of one's "truth-word," or oath.
www.caraweb.org /articles/khmermentality.html   (4147 words)

  
 The Khmer Rouge regime
Several demographic anal yses (by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and the U.N. Population Bureau) have estimated the death toll to be between 1 million and 2 million.
One of the conceits of the Khmer Rouge Party Center was that Democratic Kampuchea was capable of seizing through military conquest regions of present-day Vietnam which were lost to Cambodian control through Vietnamese expansion over the last five hundre d years.
Today, however, some seventeen years and three Cambodian regimes later, the "National Army of Democratic Kampuchea," as the Khmer Rouge military is known, continues to wage warfare from jungle redouts in an attempt to regain control of Cambodia and res ume their utopian experiment.
www.cybercambodia.com /dachs/killing/khmer_rouge.html   (551 words)

  
 Untitled Document
The Kingdom of Cambodia was abolished, and the Khmer Republic was established.
The leader of the Khmer Rouge was Pol Pot, formerly known as Solath Sar.
The Khmer Rouge party was pushed to the borders of Thailand and into the mountains.
www.mtholyoke.edu /~amballar/page2.html   (825 words)

  
 http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~aemorse/cambodia/battles.html   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-04)
The 1960's was the beginning of the war between the Khmers and the Khmer Rouge.
In the spring of 1974, the Khmer Rouge spread its conflict to the two large provincial capitals of Kampot and Oudong.
The 28th Brigade and the 7th Division of FANK surrounded the Khmer Rouge in Kampot, but due to the lack of leadership, the Khmer Rouge were able to slip through the army.
www.mtholyoke.edu /~aemorse/khmers.html   (397 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Oukoubah is an Arabic word meaning "justice." This book explores the genocide of the Cham ethnic group, making a case that the Cham, who are Muslim, were killed at a rate that was double to nearly triple that of the general population.
The author presents case studies of 13 Cham prisoners at the infamous Tuol Sleng Prison, known to the Khmer Rouge as "Office S-21." The prisoners included seven Khmer Rouge soldiers, two Khmer Republic Government officials, a student, a fisherman, a Khmer Rouge interrogator at S-21, and a peasant who fled the regime.
Unlike the monotone chanting style of Khmer poetry, Oeur's style is distinct in its operatic and emotionally charged qualities.
www.hawaii.edu /khmer/ip361.html   (471 words)

  
 TheHistoryNet | Vietnam | Losing Ground to the Khmer Rouge
Khmer Air Force (KAF) North American T-28 armed trainers loosed napalm and high explosive onto positions 600 feet from the venerable temple and against two former tourist hotels about one-half mile south.
Marshal Lon Nol, key player in the 1970 ouster of neutralist Prince Norodom Sihanouk, consolidated his hold on the Khmer Republic by adding the title of president to those of prime minister and defense minister in March 1972.
Because of misuse, the Khmer Krom, combat-hardened Cambodians from South Vietnam who provided the backbone for 13 FANK brigades and the Special Forces, were virtually absent from the ranks by the end of 1972.
www.historynet.com /vn/blkhmer_rouge   (1877 words)

  
 Comparative Criminology | Asia - Cambodia
The Khmer Republic's leadership was plagued by disunity among its three principal figures: Lon Nol, Sihanouk's cousin Sirik Matak, and National Assembly leader In Tam.
By 1973, the Khmer Rouge were fighting major battles against government forces on their own, and they controlled nearly 60% of Cambodia's territory and 25% of its population.
A new constitution in January 1976 established Democratic Kampuchea as a Communist People's Republic, and a 250-member Assembly of the Representatives of the People of Kampuchea (PRA) was selected in March to choose the collective leadership of a State Presidium, the chairman of which became the head of state.
www-rohan.sdsu.edu /faculty/rwinslow/asia_pacific/cambodia.html   (7179 words)

  
 Glossary - Thai / Cambodia Border Refugee Camps Website   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-04)
The CPK dominated the Khmer Republic resisting forces from 1970 to 1975 and ruled Cambodia from 1975 to 1978.
Free Khmer - Anti-French, nationalist movement organized with Thai backing in 1945 from elements spanning the political spectrum; within a year split into factions, and by independence all but one of them were incorporated into Sihanouk's political structure.
Later (although a misnomer) it was applied to the insurgents of varying ideological backgrounds who opposed the Khmer Republic regime of Lon Nol.
www.websitesrcg.com /border/glossary.html   (1607 words)

  
 Chronology of Cambodian History, 1970-1974
Khmer Krom Brigade were ambushed by the communists Southeast of Neak Luong along Route 1, only 13 soldiers returned to friendly lines while approximately 600 others were officially unaccounted for.
Grenade was thrown into meeting of striking teachers and their students in Phnom Penh…….Assassination attempted against Lon Nol: a Khmer air force Captain So Potra hijacked a T-28D fighter-bomber from Pochentong and dropped two 250-pound bombs on Chamcar Mon Palace in an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate the Khmer Republic President.
Khmer Rouge shell Takeo province and seize a portion of the road linking the province with Phnom Penh.
www.geocities.com /khmerchronology/1970.htm   (7166 words)

  
 Khmer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Khmer language, the language of the Khmer and the official language of Cambodia
Khmer Empire, which ruled much of Indochina from the 9th to the 13th centuries.
Khmer Rouge, a Cambodian Communist political group and guerilla movement.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Khmer   (137 words)

  
 Yale > Cambodian Genocide Project > Resources > The Son Sen Files, 1976-1977
Khmer Rouge forces led by Pol Pot defeat Lon Nol army and take Phnom Penh on 17 April 1975.
Khmer Rouge forces signed the agreement but declined to abide by its provisions for ceasefire, UN supervision, demobilisation and disarmament.
Khmer Rouge forces split, with Ieng Sary defecting to the government in return for an amnesty.
www.yale.edu /cgp/chron.html   (779 words)

  
 John Kerry shot at by Khmer Rouge?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-04)
Khmer Rouge Noun: A Cambodian Communist movement that was active as a guerrilla force from 1970 to the late 1990s and held power under the leadership of Pol Pot from 1975 to 1979.
Prior to 1970, the Khmer Rouge was an insignificant factor in Cambodian politics...
After having tea with the Khmer Rouge, and on trying to sneak back across the border he was mistakenly shot at by Americans patrolling the border.
www.freerepublic.com /focus/f-news/1188332/posts   (2906 words)

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