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Topic: Kofun


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In the News (Fri 22 Mar 19)

  
  Kofun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The "aft" of the kofun was usually oriented toward south or west.
Kofun range in size from several meters to over 400 m in length.
Kofun are also classified according to whether the entrance to the stone burial chamber is vertical (tate-ana) or horizontal (yoko-ana).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kofun   (257 words)

  
 Kofun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kofun is an era in the history of Japan from around A.D. to A.D. A kofun is any tomb (tumulus) of this kind.
Much of the material culture of the Kofun period is barely distinguishable from those of the contemperaneous Southern Korean Peninsula, demonstrating that at this time Japan was in close political and economic contact with continental Asia through Korea.
The Kofun period is seen as ending by A.D. 538, when the use of elaborate kofun by the Yamato and other elite fell out of use because of prevailing new Buddhist beliefs, which put greater emphasis on the transience of human life.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Kofun_Period   (781 words)

  
 Kofun - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kofun (古墳) are megalythic monuments in Japan, dating back to proto-history.
The kofun tumuli, have taken various shapes through hstory.
Kofun range in size from several meters to over 400 metres in length.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Kofun   (246 words)

  
 Kofun era - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Kofun period (Japanese: 古墳時代, Kofun-jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around AD 250 to 538.
Much of the material culture of the Kofun period is barely distinguishable from that of the contemporaneous southern Korean peninsula, demonstrating that at this time Japan was in close political and economic contact with continental Asia (especially with the southern dynasties of China) through Korea.
The Kofun period of Japanese culture is also sometimes called the Yamato period by some Western scholars, since this local chieftainship arose to become the Imperial dynasty at the end of the Kofun period.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kofun_period   (631 words)

  
 Kofun Culture
But in another sense, the Kofun Period is the beginning of Japanese history -- for there are many records compiled just after the period closed, and these records are based on older, contemporary documents that were destroyed or on oral histories still circulating at that time.
Similar round and square mounds with moats continued all through the Kofun Period, although the Kofun burial was placed in the top of the mound instead of under it, as in the Yayoi Period.
The date for the end of the Kofun Period is placed variously at 552 (the official date for the introduction of Buddhism) or 710 (the date of the move to the Heijo-kyo capital).
www.t-net.ne.jp /~keally/kofun.html   (4763 words)

  
 Art History 153. Kofun “Keyhole” Tombs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
KOFUN 古墳 (300-710 CE): “ancient tomb.” Refers to large burial mounds and to the period itself.
The mound was typically key-hole shaped, and was decorated with clay haniwa.
Haniwa はにわ: Clay burial figures that were placed on the surface of the kofun mound.
www.lclark.edu /~claypool/153webhandouts/2kofun.html   (210 words)

  
 Kofun: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Kofun   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kofun is an era in Japan from around A.D. to A.D. The Kofun period (ca.
The mounds contained large stone burial chambers, many of which were shaped like keyholes and some of which were surrounded by moats[?].
This society was most developed in the Kinai Region and the easternmost part of the Inland Sea (Seto Naikai[?]), and its armies established a foothold on the southern tip of Korea.
www.encyclopedian.com /ko/Kofun.html   (605 words)

  
 Kofun and Yamato Era
Kofun Era therefore must have had something to do with the burial; many people might have been buried, or there was only burial and burial and nothing but burial.
As a matter of fact, in the Kofun era a lot of such burial mounds were discovered, and to such an extent, that the period from 300AD to 710 AD, the period has been called Kofun Era.
The Kofuns themselves are of different shapes, some of keyhole shape thought to be the tombs of the Imperial period.
www.indo.to /english/culture/kofun.html   (789 words)

  
 Kofun: Ancient Burial Mounds in Japan
Preceding the construction of the above kofuns, several large keyhole-shaped mounds, accompanied by many additional smaller ones, were built in the southeastern part of the Nara Basin.
This region is considered the cradle of the early Yamato Kingdom, the predecessor of the Japanese court.
While large kofuns decreased in number, small burial mounds for the common people built in clusters increased sharply.
www.hgeo.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp /soramitsu/kofun.html   (540 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kofun is the symbol of "Kofun Period", providing important information to solve secrets in the ancient world.
Kofun changed their shape from the early Kofun period to the late period.
For dating of Kofun, we consider dimensions of seven parts of the tomb (length of tomb, width of front, radius of back, width of the neck,height of front, height of the neck and height of back).
www.ozlab.osakac.ac.jp /KOFUN_E   (1179 words)

  
 JAPANESE PREHISTORY
In the absence of historical documents, scholars are able to gain some insights into the religious beliefs and practices of the prehistoric Japanese from the artifacts unearthed by archaeologists, as well as from the historical records of the Chinese (see, for example, the account of Wa recorded in the History of the Kingdom of Wei).
The burial mounds of the Kofun period have been linked to earlier Japanese evidence of hillside or mountain burials, as well as to similar practices on the Korean mainland.
By far the most striking objects to be placed at kofun, however, are haniwa, 3- to 5-foot high ceramic cylinders embedded in the exterior slope of burial mounds or surrounding burial chambers.
faculty.sxu.edu /~bathgate/gallery/Japan/japan.html   (754 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Japan - Kofun And Asuka Periods, Ca. A.D. 250-710 | Japanese Information Resource   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Kofun period is seen as ending by around A.D. when the use of elaborate kofun by the Yamato and other elite fell out of use because of prevailing new Buddhist beliefs, which put greater emphasis on the transience of human life.
The Yamato state evolved still further during the Asuka period, which is named after the Asuka region, south of modern Nara, the site of numerous temporary imperial capitals established during the period.
The Asuka period is known for its significant artistic, social, and political transformations, which had their origins in the late Kofun period.
reference.allrefer.com /country-guide-study/japan/japan16.html   (1640 words)

  
 Sites
The Kofun (tr: 'tomb') period is marked by the massive burial mounds (or tumuli) in which lords, chieftans, emporers, or other VIPs were buried.
They are arranged by period (early, middle, late kofun) and marked by geographical area.
If you get excited about burial mounds, the huge key-shaped and moated tumulus of Emperor Nintoku (4th century) is in Sakai city, southeast of Osaka (Mozu station on the JR Haniwa line from Tennoji); but don't expect to get in.
userpages.chorus.net /burleigh/art/tumuli.html   (328 words)

  
 Kitora Kofun Explored
In 1983, a probe was inserted into Kitora Kofun from the South, and an indistinct image of Genbu (The Black Tortoise of the North) was found on the opposite (North) wall.
However, the probe of 2001 showed depicted stars in Kitora Kofun to be painted in gold leaf as they were in the earlier explored tomb.
Of course, because the ecliptic is at an angle to the celestial equator, a circle on a planar chart could never accurately portray the oblique shape of the ecliptic of which any point would be in spherical angular measurement from the celestial equator.
www2.gol.com /users/stever/kitora.htm   (3544 words)

  
 Yayoi stone heaps found in Kagawa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Officials said that since some of the clusters resemble the keyhole-shaped tumuli for which the Kofun period (300-710) is named, the stone heaps may provide clues to the evolution of the burial tradition between the periods of Japanese prehistory.
No burial accessories were found in any of the heaps, but fragments of stone implements like knives were present, suggesting that leaders of an early agricultural settlement were buried at the site.
Experts are now trying to determine the connection between the Narishige mounds and the Iwase Oyama tomb cluster from the early Kofun period found some 40 km away in Takamatsu.
www.trussel.com /prehist/news69.htm   (423 words)

  
 ar #1601 #1578 #1585 #1577 #1603 #1608 #1601 #1608 #1606 ...
Much of the material culture material culture of the Kofun period is barely indistinguishable from those of the contemperaneous Southern Korean Peninsula, demonstrating that at this time Japan was in close political and economic contact with continental Asia through Korea.
The Kofun Kofun Period of Japanese culture is also sometimes called the Yamato Period by some Western Scholars, since this local Chieftain ship eventually rose up to become the Imperial Dynasty at the end of the Kofun Kofun Period.
Japanese archaeologists find this a little predeterministic and emphasise the fact that in the early half of the Kofun Kofun Period other regional Chieftainships, such as Kibi Kibi near modern day Okayama Okayama were in close contention for the crown More exchange occurred between Japan and the continent of Asia late in the Kofun period.
www.biodatabase.de /Kofun   (778 words)

  
 Redating the Keyhole Tombs
By dating wood from a well shaft and a building pillar belonging to the Yayoi period, immediately preceding the appearance of kofun, Mitsutani has established that a pottery style associated with the wood is 100 years older than once thought.
Most Japanese archaeologists have accepted this change for the Yayoi, and are assessing the amount of chronological revision needed for the emergence of kofun.
If the date for the emergence of kofun is moved back to the mid-third century or earlier, the likelihood that the Chinese were dealing with envoys from Yamato becomes stronger.
www.he.net /~archaeol/online/news/japan.html   (189 words)

  
 Kofun Encyclopedia Article, Description, History and Biography @ VariedTastes.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Looking For kofun - Find kofun and more at Lycos Search.
Find kofun - Your relevant result is a click away!
They gave their name to the Kofun era (c AD 250–538), a part of the Yamato era
www.variedtastes.com /encyclopedia/Kofun   (376 words)

  
 Urban Spirit
Many are also on kofun, and it is easy to see the validity of such a site, both because of the resemblance of kofun to miniature mountains and because Konohanasakuyahime was a divine ancestor.
The Hakusan Jinja kofun was already called Fujizuka, and in 1826 the Fujiko built a hokora (small jinja) on the summit.
I hope that the kofun is still unexcavated in a century, overlooking swamps where eel-catchers punt between the ruins of office-blocks.
www.northernearth.co.uk /91/urban.htm   (1278 words)

  
 Kofun Period: 300 to 710
Beginning in the south, on the east side of the Inland Sea, the peoples started to build giant earthen mounds as tombs, called Kofun, for their leaders.
The Kofun contained Yayoi objects at first, so the tombs may simply be the product of the evolution of the Yayoi culture.
More importantly than the Kofun for the history of Japan, is the emergence of the Yamato leadership.
www.dynamic-systems.info /Japan_history/kofun.htm   (658 words)

  
 Chiriko's Blurty -- Entries   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
What is so significant about Takamatsu Zuka Kofun is the fact that it clearly shows the influence of Chinese and Korean astrology and divination on Japan in the Asuka Era.
The discovery of the tomb created much excitement throughout Japan in 1972, and a panel of Japanese archaeologists and historians held a symposium in Asuka Village on March 21, 1997 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the tomb's discovery.
Significantly, the "inhabitant" of Takamatsu Zuka Kofun was placed within a "universe" which reflected a Chinese infused "cosmology" and myth precisely linking heaven with earth.
www.blurty.com /users/chiriko   (3161 words)

  
 Category:Kofun - Wikimedia Commons
Kofun period (古墳時代) is an era in the history of Japan from around A.D. 250 to A.D.538.
It is named after kofun, the type of Japanese burial mounds from this era.
This page was last modified 21:44, 16 September 2005.
commons.wikimedia.org /wiki/Category:Kofun   (48 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Yamato period
The Yamato period (大和) (better known as the Kofun period) is the period of Japanese history when the Japanese Imperial court ruled from modern day Nara prefecture, then known as Yamato province.
The court's supremacy was challenged throughout the period from Bizen and Bitchū provinces in what is now known as Okayama prefecture, and it was only into the 6th century A.D. that the Yamato clans could be said to have any major advantage over their neighbouring clans.
Hence, Japanese archaeologists (and textbooks) tend to prefer the less deterministic term Kofun period, which reflects the diagnostic archaeological feature, the large, often keyhole shaped burial mounds (kofun) found across mainland Japan.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Yamato_period   (222 words)

  
 Takamatsu Zuka Kofun in Asuka
Takamatsu Zuka Kofun is aligned with celestial north.
As the name implies, "shuku" were associations of stars where the moon was said to reside each night in its trip around the earth.
Regardless of who was buried there, Takamatsu Zuka Kofun is one of the few known sites in Japan with a record of ancient views of the heavens.
www2.gol.com /users/stever/asuka.htm   (1137 words)

  
 Tumulus Period   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Another name by which part of this period is known is Kofun,, standing for "old tomb." The name comes from earthen mounds that were used to cover stone burial chambers of the rulers.
This time covered 195 hectares and contained vases, jewels, mirrors, weapons and other things.Later kofun contained rich treasures, indicating the concentration of wealth and power in the Yamato region.
The largest kofun is associated with the emperor Nintoku and is on the Osaka Plain and covers over 80 acres.
www.bookmice.net /darkchilde/japan/tumulus.html   (347 words)

  
 [No title]
The Sacred Mirror of Kofun HINTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Disk 2: Leaving Hawaii, John Braddy Video, John Braddy Enigma #1 Level 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Ann Fong is on board but I don't know how to continue.
The Sacred Mirror of Kofun HINTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Disk 3: 3 ISC Dives and the ISC Alert Dive Level 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ I've set sail for Palau, but I now have two possible destinations.
The Sacred Mirror of Kofun HINTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Disk 2: Dives at Shinkoku (Braddy Coordinates),Nippo, Fujikawa, and Betty Bomber Level 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ I don't see Braddy's coordinates on the map, where should I go?.
www.fortunecity.com /underworld/console/307/s/sacredmirrorofkofun.txt   (2309 words)

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