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Topic: Kollikodon


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Platypus - Fossilized Hot Cross Bun Discovered
It is unlike anything else found, as the molars in the lower jaw resemble a hot cross bun.
Called Kollikodon ritchiei, because of its molar number and extraordinarily odd teeth, it comes from a new family of monotremes or Kollikodontidae (platypuses, echidnas, and their relations - all egg-laying mammals).
This new specimen, although found 30km from where an original lower jaw fragment was unearthed, almost perfectly matches, when placed in 'occlusion', the lower teeth donated to the Museum by Bob and Elizabeth Jones, experts in fossilised opals.
www.austmus.gov.au /platypus   (544 words)

  
  Kollikodon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Kollikodon lived in the lower Cretaceous period, during the middle Albian age (100-104 million years ago).
Like Steropodon, Kollikodon was a relatively large mammal for the Mesozoic.
Both Kollikodon and Steropodon can be found at the Australian Museum in Sydney, along with Eric, the opalised pliosaur.
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/k/ko/kollikodon.html   (250 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> monotreme   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
These fragments, from species Steropodon galmani, are the oldest known fossils of monotremes.
Fossils from the genera Kollikodon, Teinolophos, and Obdurodon have also been discovered.
In 1991, a fossil tooth of a 61-million-year-old platypus was found in southern Argentina (since named Monotrematum, though it is now considered to be an Obdurodon species).
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/monotreme   (768 words)

  
 Kollikodon
Age: Lower Cretaceous : middle Albian (100-104 million years ago) The existence of this species is based on an opalised fragment of dentary, with one premolar and two molar s in situ.
Kollikodon was possibly at least partly aquatic : its strange teeth would work well for crushing shellfish.
This was felt to be invalid in terms of the rules of zoological nomenclature, and so Kollikodon was officially proposed.
www.vvvvitamins.com /article-Kollikodon.html   (260 words)

  
 Cancridontia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Their evolution was possibly spurred on by the chilling of the southern oceans towards the end of the Eocene that would have been to the detriment of non-mammalian competitors, like mosasaurs.
One intriguing Mesozoic jaw-fossil is Kollikodon, an Early Cretaceous Australian monotreme that possessed similar rounded cusps to those of walducks (although arranged in a more conventional double rather than single row).
Drawing a relationship between walducks and Kollikodon is tempting but is difficult to prove in the absence of fossil postcrania from the latter.
www.bowdoin.edu /~dbensen/Spec/Cancridontia.htm   (2842 words)

  
 Fossil sites of Australia - Lightning Ridge
Kollikodon's species name honours palaeontologist Alex Ritchie of the Australian Museum whose persistent consultation with Lightning Ridge opal miners over many years resulted in the discovery of many important fossils such as Steropodon and Kollikodon.
The sandstone at Lightning Ridge once formed the floor of an ancient shallow inland sea where plants, aquatic life and occasionally the bones and teeth of animals were preserved.
Palaeontologists searching for fossils of dinosaurs and primitive mammals at Lightning Ridge consult with opal miners to see what they have found, or obtain permission to sift through spoil heaps and excavate in opal mines.
www.amonline.net.au /fossil_sites/lightning.htm   (621 words)

  
 Australia's Lost Kingdoms - Early Cretaceous period - Animals
The name Steropodon means 'Lightning tooth' and refers to the flash of colour in this opalised fossil.
Kollikodon had bizarre hot-cross-bun-shaped teeth, hence its nickname 'Hotcrossbunodon'.
Its teeth are so different from those of Steropodon that their common monotreme ancestor must be much older.
www.lostkingdoms.com /snapshots/cretaceous_early_mammals.htm   (315 words)

  
 Re: No aquatic dinos? (was Re: No dinosaurs in Quebec, Canada?)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
From: pwillis@ozemail.com.au (Paul Willis) > Kollikodon probably derives from the Griman Creek Formation which is > thought to be distal esturine deposits.
> Kollikodon is known from a single dentary fragment with three teeth, it > would be very difficult to determine if it was living there of (more > likely) it was a blow in (or should I say wash in).
Sigh, well given that provenance, the status indeed is ambiguous.
dml.cmnh.org /1996Nov/msg00655.html   (140 words)

  
 fossils opals australia rocks shells palaeontology cretaceous dinosaur jurassic
Australia's oldest and most famous mammal fossils are 110-million-year-old opalised jaw bones of two mammals named Steropodon and Kollikodon, which are relatives of the living platypus and echidnas.
Today's platypus loses its teeth before reaching adulthood, whereas Steropodon and Kollikodon had large teeth as adults.
Mammal fossils from the age of the dinosaurs are extremely rare in Australia.
www.lostseaopals.com.au /fossils   (1022 words)

  
 Non-reptilian life in Mesozoic Australia
The fossil consists of a jaw fragment with three teeth, that somewhat resemble the milk teeth of baby platypus.
Also from Lightning Ridge, and also opalised, are the teeth of Kollikodon ritchieri ("bun-like tooth").
It was also a monotreme, which had teeth shaped like hot cross buns.
www.geocities.com /dannsdinosaurs/non-rept.html   (2620 words)

  
 Re: At least it's not Hotcrossbunodon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Each tooth >looks like a hot-cross bun, leading to the animal being >dubbed the kollikodon (from the ancient Greek word for bread >roll).
> >The kollikodon lived in the age of dinosaurs, when mammals >were rarley larger than mice.
This find seems to have been >the size of an otter.
dml.cmnh.org /1995Oct/msg00812.html   (278 words)

  
 Dinosaur Dreaming, 2001 Research report, Monash Science Centre
From their size being significantly greater than the ausktribosphenids, it is likely that they belong to the other group of mammals known to occur in the Australian Mesozoic, the egg-laying monotremes.
Although not giants today, compared with most Mesozoic mammals, monotremes such as the Lightning Ridge Steropodon and Kollikodon, were amongst the largest mammals of their day.
What these specimens are, though intriguing in itself, is not their greatest importance.
www.sci.monash.edu.au /msc/dinodream/inverloc/dig2001/researpt.html   (1602 words)

  
 Lightning Ridge and Inverloch - Fossil Sites - Australian Beasts - ABC Science
The opal fields of Lightning Ridge in New South Wales have produced a few jaws and teeth of small monotremes.
Steropodon and Kollikodon are both thought to be platypus-like animals that were no larger than a small cat.
They shared a world, dominated by dinosaurs, with small crocodiles and turtles.
www.abc.net.au /science/ausbeasts/sites/lightningridge.htm   (277 words)

  
 Mesozoic Eucynodonts, Vocabulary
In terms of this project, this taxon is used as meaning the most recent common ancestor of Sinodelphys and a koala, and all of its descendants.
In terms of this project, this taxon is used as meaning the most recent common ancestor of Kollikodon, Teinolophos and a duck-billed platypus, and all of its descendants.
In terms of this project, this taxon is presently accepted as the most basal known family within Mammalia.
home.arcor.de /ktdykes/vocab.htm   (6558 words)

  
 biology - Monotreme
These fragments, from species Steropodon galmani, are the oldest known fossils of monotremes.
Fossils from the genera Kollikodon, Teinolophos, and Obdurodon have also been discovered.
In 1991, a fossil tooth of a 61-million-year-old platypus was found in southern Argentina (since named Monotrematum, though it is now considered to be an Obdurodon species).
www.biologydaily.com /biology/Monotreme   (778 words)

  
 MESOZOIC MAMMALS?; Monotremata, an internet directory:
This is based on an opalized fragment of dentary, with one premolar and two molars in situ.
Both Kollikodon and Steropodon live at the Australian Museum in Sydney, along with Eric, the opalized pliosaur.
In contrast to the Cretaceous genera, (Teinolophos and Steropodon - I don't know about Kollikodon in this respect), jaw mechanics were modified: "By the Paleocene, orthal shear apparently had been largely replaced by propalinal apical grinding of soft-bodied prey that left few abrasion facets or scratches on the molar surface", (p.237).
home.arcor.de /ktdykes/monotrem.htm   (15752 words)

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