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Topic: Kurds


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PKK

In the News (Thu 16 Aug 18)

  
  Washingtonpost.com: Terrorism Report
Kurds, no longer free to roam, were forced to abandon their seasonal migrations and traditional ways.
During the early 20th century, Kurds began to consider the concept of nationalism, a notion introduced by the British amid the division of traditional Kurdistan among neighboring countries.
The Kurds received especially harsh treatment at the hands of the Turkish government, which tried to deprive them of Kurdish identity by designating them "Mountain Turks," outlawing their language and forbidding them to wear traditional Kurdish costumes in the cities.
www.washingtonpost.com /wp-srv/inatl/daily/feb99/kurdprofile.htm   (920 words)

  
 Kurds. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Revolts by the Kurds of Turkey in 1925 and 1930 were forcibly quelled.
The Kurds refused to accept the terms of the agreement, however, contending that the president of Iraq would retain real authority and demanding that Kirkuk, an important oil center, be included in the autonomous Kurdish region.
Iraqi attacks on the Kurds continued throughout the Iran-Iraq War (1980–88), culminating (1988) in poison gas attacks on Kurdish villages to quash resistance and in the rounding up and execution of male Kurds, all of which resulted in the killing of some 200,000 in that year alone.
www.bartleby.com /65/ku/Kurds.html   (1224 words)

  
  Kurds
Kurds speak Kurdish, a language of the western Iranian branch of the Indo-European languages.
The clear majority of Kurds are Sunni Muslims, but a small group of less than 100,000 living in Iraq (small communities scattered in Turkey, Iran, and Syria, too) are Yazidis, the so called "devil worshipers".
Kurds living in Kurdistan, are predominantly living in rural districts, and among Kurds there are some that keep up nomadic and semi-nomadic lifestyles.
lexicorient.com /e.o/kurds.htm   (468 words)

  
 Asia Times Online :: Middle East News, Iraq, Iran current affairs
For the Kurds, they have fought with their blood and lives to live this day, and they are determined to not settle for anything less than what they feel they deserve - now federalism, as proposed in the draft constitution submitted to parliament this week, perhaps later full autonomy, even independence.
The independent-minded view of the Kurds was visible in an unofficial referendum that was held side-by-side with the Iraqi national elections in January - an overwhelming majority of the population voted yes to secession.
The Kurds are fiercely proud that their millennia-old heritage, culture and language have never diminished, despite decades of ethnic cleansing and attempts at subjugation.
www.atimes.com /atimes/Middle_East/GH31Ak04.html   (1376 words)

  
 Kurdish people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Before the spread of Islam in the 7th century, most Kurds practiced Zoroastrianism, which is believed to be one of the oldest religions in the world.
Today, however, the majority of the Kurds are believed to be Sunni Muslims, belonging to the Shafi and Hanafi Schools of Islam.
Talabani, a Kurd and the leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, is one of the longest serving Kurdish Iraqi politicians but has currently distanced himself from the movement for Kurdish independence, pledging to support Iraqi federalism at least for the time being.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kurds   (2715 words)

  
 Kurds
Kurds speak Kurdish, a language of the western Iranian branch of the Indo-European languages.
The clear majority of Kurds are Sunni Muslims, but a small group of less than 100,000 living in Iraq (small communities scattered in Turkey, Iran, and Syria, too) are Yazidis, the so called "devil worshipers".
Kurds living in Kurdistan, are predominantly living in rural districts, and among Kurds there are some that keep up nomadic and semi-nomadic lifestyles.
i-cias.com /e.o/kurds.htm   (497 words)

  
 frontline: the survival of saddam: the kurds' story
Throughout the 20th century their struggles for political and cultural autonomy were opposed by the region's countries and the Kurds were often used as pawns in regional politics.
Since the 1920s, negotiations between Iraq's Kurds and the government in Baghdad have always broken down over issues of Kurdish independence, and the Kurds' wish to control the oil-rich city of Kirkuk and to have their own militia.
This transcript of a National Public Radio "Talk of the Nation" 1996 broadcast offers background on the Kurds, as well as discussion among several experts who put the Kurds' current plight in the region in a broader political and historical context.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/saddam/kurds   (625 words)

  
 More on the Kurds | Special reports | Guardian Unlimited
August 18: Turkey and Iran have dispatched tanks, artillery and thousands of troops to their frontiers with Iraq during the past few weeks in what appears to be a coordinated effort to disrupt the activities of Kurdish rebel bases.
February 18: Kurdish leaders in the northern autonomous area are refusing to disband their military forces and are pushing for a veto over any deployment of the Iraqi army in their region.
March 27: Turkish Kurds, whose recent history is one of suffering and death, fear that the war in Iraq could make their harsh existence even worse, writes Helena Smith on the Turkish-Iraqi border
www.guardian.co.uk /The_Kurds/0,,192981,00.html   (663 words)

  
 Kurds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kurds who live in Kurdistan often live in rural districts; a few keep up a nomadic or semi-nomadic life style.
The Kurds have a long history of being controlled in a tension filled region.
With the absence of a central government, many Kurd’s considered their clan leaders to be their highest source of authority (1).
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/cultural/oldworld/middle_east/kurds.html   (436 words)

  
 Kurds
The Turkish representative, Ismet Pasha, declared at Lausanne: "The Kurds and the Turks are the essential components of the Republic of Turkey.
Article 39 of the Treaty of Lausanne, according to which the citizens of Turkey have the right to freely use their respective languages in all areas of life, was trampled upon, and the Kurdish language was totally forbidden in the educational system and the printed media.
The country is being subjected to a UN embargo, and the Iraqi Kurds are in an extremely difficult situation.
members.aol.com /KHilfsvere/Kurds.html   (4618 words)

  
 KURDS
The Kurds are people of Indo-European origin who live mainly in the mountains and uplands where Turkey, Iraq, and Iran meet, in an area known as "Kurdistan" for hundreds of years.
In Turkey almost 10 million Kurds are forbidden to use their own language or to describe themselves as Kurds, on pain of imprisonment Kurds are officially known as "Mountain Turks".
The successes of the Iraqi Kurds in the field of language and education have, however, enabled them to create an impressive literature and a fully adequate written language, and have produced a generation of Kurds whose primary and secondary education have been in Kurdish.
www.cool.mb.ca /~kakel/kurds.html   (742 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Syria - Kurds | Syrian Information Resource
Most Kurds are farmers; some are city dwellers; and others are nomads who drive their flocks far into the mountains in the summer and graze them on the lowlands in the winter.
Kurds who have left the more isolated villages and entered Arab society have generally adopted the dress and customs of the community in which they live.
Kurds who have entered the country in the present generation usually retain much of the language, dress, and customs of their native highlands.
reference.allrefer.com /country-guide-study/syria/syria33.html   (631 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Kurds
Kurds, a non-Arab Middle Eastern minority population that inhabits the region known as Kurdistan, an extensive plateau and mountain area, c.74,000 sq mi (191,660 sq km), in SW Asia, including parts of E Turkey, NE Iraq, and NW Iran and smaller sections of NE Syria and Armenia.
Iraqi attacks on the Kurds continued throughout the Iran-Iraq War (1980-88), culminating (1988) in poison gas attacks on Kurdish villages to quash resistance and in the rounding up and execution of male Kurds, all of which resulted in the killing of some 200,000 in that year alone.
There were also clashes between the Kurds of Turkey and Iraq in the 1990s and Kurdish unrest in Syria in 2004 and Syria and Iran in 2005.
www.reference.com /browse/columbia/Kurds   (1264 words)

  
 1
The Iraqi Kurds have also been the victims of an accident of geography, for vast oil reserves were discovered in the 20th century on the fringes of their ancestral lands.
The relocated Kurds were simply driven south in convoys of trucks, dumped in the middle of nowhere and left to their own resources.
As before, the Kurds drew their water from rivers, springs and underground streams,48 and the more prosperous took their electrical power from private generators.
www.hrw.org /reports/1993/iraqanfal/ANFAL1.htm   (9700 words)

  
 The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire
In 1939 the number of Kurds registered in the Soviet Union was 76,000, according to the 1959 census this number had decreased to 59,000 (26,000 in Armenia, 16,000 in Georgia and more than 14,000 in Central Asia and Kazakhstan).
As to the Central-Asian Kurds, it is known that a big group of them settled there at the end of the 19th century arriving from the Horassan Province of East-Persia, however, they had been preceded by smaller groups.
Demarcated by origin, faith and habitat, there are three big Kurdish communities: the Kurds of Azerbaijan (mostly settling from Persia at the beginning of the 19th century), the Kurds of Armenia (mostly from Turkey but partly from Persia after the beginning of the 18th century) and the Kurds of Georgia (mostly from Turkey and Armenia).
www.eki.ee /books/redbook/kurds.shtml   (1628 words)

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