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Topic: LLRV


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In the News (Fri 26 Apr 19)

  
  NASA Dryden Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) Movie Collection
The LLRV was flown using a conventional stick and "rudder" pedal system for controlling attitude and yaw.
The LLRV was able to duplicate the "feel" of the LM's controls, and it was equipped with some LM instrumentation, such as a radar altimeter, a Doppler radar for measuring velocity, and an accelerometer that gave indications in units of lunar gravity, from -1 to +10.
Then the VTOL mode was disengaged, and the LLRV was flown in lunar mode: the jet's gimbal was unlocked, and lunar flight conditions were automatically simulated.
www.dfrc.nasa.gov /Gallery/Movie/LLRV/index.html   (1090 words)

  
 Apollo LLRV
The LLRV's, humorously referred to as "flying bedsteads," were created by a predecessor of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the tiny Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's airless environment.
The current LLRV was capable of about 10 minutes of flight time and two minutes of lunar simulation with the lift rockets providing one-sixth of the lift.
LLRV No. 2, the sole survivor, was eventually returned to Dryden, where it is on display as a silent artifact of the Center's contribution to the Apollo program.
www.astronautix.com /craft/apoollrv.htm   (5025 words)

  
  LLRV - One Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
The LLRVs, humorously referred to as flying bedsteads (see also Flying bedstead), were used by the FRC, now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's airless environment.
Success of the two LLRVs led to the building of three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTVs) used by Apollo astronauts at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, predecessor of NASA's Johnson Space Center.
LLRV No. 2 was eventually returned to Dryden, where it is on display as a silent artifact of the Center's contribution to the Apollo program.
www.onelang.com /encyclopedia/index.php/LLRV   (987 words)

  
 Apollo LLRV and LLTV training - collectSPACE: Messages
While the LLRV was grounded, MSC Director Robert R. Gilruth appointed a five-man board of investigation to track down the cause of the crash.
Astronaut training in the LLRV and LLTV had been suspended after the crash and it was important that it be resumed as soon as possible.
LLRV no. 2 is displayed at the Dryden Flight Research Center, where it made its maiden flight in 1967.
collectspace.com /ubb/Forum29/HTML/000153.html   (2000 words)

  
 Lunar Landing Research Vehicle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Besides the queer appearance, the LLRV was equipped with an astonishingly sophisticated array of early sensoric and computational hardware.
The LLRV's Lunar Mode even was able to countercorrect wind gusts within miliseconds, as they definitely would have disturbed the impression of a missing atmosphere.
The visually significant sign of an engaged Lunar Mode was the free-gimbaled GE CF-700-V2 turbofan, always strictly pointing to the center of gravity, regardless the LLRV's current attitude.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/LLRV   (1096 words)

  
 FlightSim.Com Review: LunarPilot
Flying the LLRV was an interesting experience, not only because of the strange control system, but also because the pilot sat so far forward in the open cockpit that 95% of the machine was out of his view.
Given that the LLRVs were effectively prototypes and that they were subject to continual changes during their working lives, the developer has chosen to simulate a representative panel layout from one of the 1963 builds.
Entering the latter is mind-bogglingly difficult, as you have to position the LLRV precisely within the arms extending out from the eight segment door and wait there for the green arrow to light.
www.flightsim.com /cgi/kds?$=main/review/lunar/lunar.htm   (1920 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - LLRV
The LLRVs, humorously referred to as flying bedsteads (see also Flying bedstead), were used by the FRC, now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's airless environment.
Success of the two LLRVs led to the building of three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTVs) used by Apollo astronauts at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, predecessor of NASA's Johnson Space Center.
LLRV No. 2 was eventually returned to Dryden, where it is on display as a silent artifact of the Center's contribution to the Apollo program.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/LLRV   (878 words)

  
 Clavius: Vehicles - lunar landing training vehicle
LLRV no. 1, piloted by Neil Armstrong, crashed in May 1968 when the helium pressurization system for the steering jets failed, leaving Armstrong no way to control the vehicle.
Conspiracists generally refer only to Armstrong's crash and imply that this was the typical outcome of an LLRV flight.
The LLTVs and LLRVs were built to reproduce for the pilot, as best as could be determined in advance, the "feel" of flying the lunar module using whatever ad hoc technology had to be included to do that in an earth environment.
www.clavius.org /techlltv.html   (431 words)

  
 Hutch's Gallery / FX / From the Earth to the Moon / LLRV
L.L.R.V. The L.L.R.V. "the flying bedstead") is a vertical take off and landing aircraft that was used as practice for flying the Lunar Excursion Module.
An actual L.L.R.V. was suspended from a crane for live action shots with the actors.
A miniature, articulated "L.L.R.V. on a stick" gave realistic movement, and was photographed against the sky.
www.hutchfx.com /fx/HutchFX/web/gallery/fx/etm/llrv/llrv.html   (237 words)

  
 NASA - The Last 300 Feet to the Moon
The LLRVs, humorously referred to as flying bedsteads, were used by the FRC, now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's airless environment.
During training flights at Houston, three of the five vehicles were destroyed in crashes; LLRV No. 1 in May 1968 and two LLTVs in December 1968 and January 1971.
The final 300-foot descent to the lunar surface was the last major step in the journey to the moon, leading to Armstrong's incredible first step there 35 years ago.
www.nasa.gov /centers/dryden/news/Features/2004/llrv.html   (674 words)

  
 About Facts Net
When test flights of the LLRV began in October 1964, chase support for the vehicle was supplied by a Bell 47 helicopter.
LLRV test operations were phased out in late 1966 and early 1967.
The LLRV had a turbofan engine mounted vertically in a gimbal, with 4200 pounds of thrust.
aboutfacts.net /AirSpaceCraft27.htm   (6459 words)

  
 GPN-2000-001999 - Lunar Landing Research Vehicle in Flight
In this 1965 NASA Flight Research Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) is shown at near maximum altitude over the south base at Edwards Air Force Base.
To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF- 700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust.
On the LLRV, in case of jet engine failure, six 500-pounds-of thrust rockets could be used by the pilot to carefully apply lift thrust during the rapid descent to hopefully achieve a controllable landing.
grin.hq.nasa.gov /ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001999.html   (254 words)

  
 21 a. Impossible Lunar Module: The descent stage which cannot fly
The LLRV is a vertical take-off aircraft with several engines on the underside.
According to Wisnewski the LLRV is an "expression of a certain helplessness", in the worst case it is a "deversion" to deceive the public and to pretend preparations for a "moon landing" (Wisnewski, S.117).
But LLRV was not at all a "training's vehicle" but the LLRV had essential differences to the Lunar Module which had only one engine and had no stability of flight at all (Wisnewski, S.116).
www.geschichteinchronologie.ch /atmosphaerenfahrt/21a_Lunar-Module-descent-stage-impossible-ENGL.html   (2926 words)

  
 THINGS-TO-COME Lunar Pilot
The LLRV was not a large craft, just a bit over 3 meters in height, with the landing legs 4 meters apart.
The LLRV had a downward pointing General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine that was mounted in the center of the LLRV.
Everything from the LLRV, with its intricate pipes, conduits, and a pilot that is fully animated, to the "Lunar Landscape" inside that behemoth of a building (Lunar Terrain Simulator) that sits on the island of "Spaceville" is very crisp and clear..
www.farmboyzimsflightsims.com /Lunar_Pilot.html   (2507 words)

  
 AVSIM Online - Flight Simulation's Number 1 Site!
But you may be interested to know that the LLRV and a much less detailed version of the lunar terrain simulator are a real piece of history that date back to the early 1960’s.
First flown on October 30, 1964 by a N.A.S.A X-15 pilot by the name of Joseph A. Walker, the LLRV is an open cockpit VTOL hovering aircraft used to train astronauts for lunar landings.
Manufactured by Bell Aerosystems, the LLRV is powered by a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine that provides 5/6 of the thrust keeping the vehicle aloft.
www.avsim.com /pages/0206/LunarPilot/LP.htm   (4765 words)

  
 LLRV Test Flights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
The Lunar Landing Research Vehicles (LLRVs) were informally known as the "flying bedsteads".
These vehicles were created by the NASA Flight Research Center (which later became Dryden Flight Research Center) to test technology and flying techniques for the upcoming lunar landings.
Following the success of the LLRV vehicles, NASA created three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTVs) to specifically train astronauts.
www.space-video.info /moon/apollo/llrv-tests.html   (60 words)

  
 Flight Simulator X - THINGS-TO-COME's Lunar Pilot
Unfortunately, LLRV uses the somewhat faulty flight simulator helicopter model, so it may be difficult to fly it at first - nothing that can't be overcome with some practice.
The LLRV panel looks like a helicopter panel, and is an accurate reproduction of the real one.
The LLRV handles like a helicopter; if you are experienced with them, you will have no problem - if you are not, back the realism settings a little and you should have no problems too.
www.fsstation.com /reviews/lunarpilot-2.html   (1184 words)

  
 NASA Dryden Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) Photo Collection
LLRV flight #1-16-61F with Bell 47 Helicopter providing chase support.
Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight lifting off from ramp
Pilot Joe Walker in Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) on ramp
www.dfrc.nasa.gov /Gallery/Photo/LLRV/index.html   (1154 words)

  
 Lunar Pilot by Things To Come. - Reviewed at FSimCafe.com
Comparing the real LLRV to that of the Things To Come LLRV they are very close visually and are really quite amazing when you consider the amount of detail that is in the model itself.
Each LLRV has a separate flight mode, thus allowing you to simulate landing in a weightless environment, you just have to remember to flip the switch when you enter the simulated moon environment.
The LLRV’s are incredibly detailed, so when you run those with the Space Ville scenery you will find that it will degrade your frame rates a bit, I ended up teaching myself to fly the LLRV at Nellis AFB instead simply because I was able to keep the frame rates up to 25 FPS.
www.fsimcafe.com /Reviews/ShowReview.aspx?ReviewID=45   (1719 words)

  
 The Last 300 Feet To The Moon
At the start of the Apollo program in 1960, there were no simulators for would-be moonwalkers to learn the art and finesse of landing on the lunar surface.
The LLRVs, humorously referred to as flying bedsteads, were used by the FRC, now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's airless environment.
During training flights at Houston, three of the five vehicles were destroyed in crashes; LLRV No. 1 in May 1968 and two LLTVs in December 1968 and January 1971.
www.spacedaily.com /news/lunar-04za.html   (686 words)

  
 Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV)
It had a weight distribution and throttle reaction time similar to that of the real LM and a downward-facing turbofan engine to provide vertical thrust.
The LLRV was based around the early VTOL “Flying Bedsteads” developed to study the potential of vertical takeoff and landing for jet aircraft.
Neil Armstrong had a narrow escape when the LLRV he was flying went out of control and he was forced to eject.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/L/LLRV.html   (167 words)

  
 WSPilots.com :: TTC Lunar Pilot Review
The pilot manual is full of great screen shots of the LLRV, historical pictures of the actual LLRV and development team, Apollo 11 Moon landing, maps of Spaceville, Shepard International Airport, inside and out of the Lunar Terrain Simulator (LTS), and the North American P-51 included as an extra bonus.
The LLRV allowed astronauts a means of practicing lunar landings prior to the actual missions.
Neil Armstrong practiced with the LLRV having to eject during his twenty-first flight before the LLRV crashed.
www.wspilots.com /index.php?page=53   (853 words)

  
 TO THE MOON, MARS, AND BEYOND
With a foreword by Neil Armstrong explaining the importance of the LLRV, this monograph tells the fascinating story of how engineers, largely at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, developed a vehicle to touch down on the Moon.
The spider-like LLRVs were used to develop control and landing techniques needed by Apollo astronauts to safely land lunar modules (LM) on the moon where there is no air to support a winged vehicle, and where gravity is only onesixth that of Earth.
Dryden's two LLRVs were prototypes for a pair of Lunar Landing Training ehicles (LLTVs) flown by Apollo astronauts at the Manned Spacecraft Center (later renamed the Johnson
kelloggserialreports.blogspot.com /2006/11/unconventional-contrary-and-ugly-lunar.html   (1637 words)

  
 .: SA VIRTUAL PILOT :.
The LLRV consisted of a tubular metal frame, carrying a jet engine, two hydrogen peroxide lift engines and sixteen hydrogen peroxide control thrusters mounted on the corners.
As expected, the unpowered sink rate is a lot less, but the fun comes in keeping the inputs small enough to have the required effect, without losing control.
With a lot of practice the LLRV does get easier to fly, so don’t be put off if you use the ejection seat a lot in the beginning.
www.virtualpilot.co.za /reviews/software/payware/LL/ll.htm   (906 words)

  
 THINGS-TO-COME Flight Sim Development + Shop
Unlike many experimental aircraft of this enthralling era, the LLRV was never intended to represent an aviational prototype at all.
It’s only reason for existence was to accommodate and familiarize the Apollo astronauts with the attitudes of a rocket-powered vehicle that flies under distinctive non-aerodynamic regimes, such as those experienced during a lunar orbit and the ensuing touchdown.
Emil E. (Jack) Kluever talks about the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) and his life becoming a test pilot for NASA and the US Air Force.
www.things-to-come.com /shop/product_info.php?products_id=63   (149 words)

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