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Topic: Lacinka alphabet


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 Yer
The letter "Ъ" ("ъ") of the Cyrillic alphabet is known as hard sign (твёрдый знак) in the modern Russian alphabet and as er golyam (ер голям, "big yer") in the Bulgarian alphabet.
The letter is absent in the alphabets of the Belarussian.
In the Cyrillic Belarussian alphabet its functions are performed by the apostrophe mark.
www.starrepublic.org /encyclopedia/wikipedia/y/ye/yer.html   (319 words)

  
 Pravapis.org - Belarusian language - Belarusian Latin Script   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
This Lacinka of the 16th-17th century was in several aspects similar to the Polish writing of that age: it used "cz" for [ch] (as in 'church'), "sz" for [sh] as in 'show', "ch" for the [ch]-sound as in 'loch', and "z" with upside down "^" for [zh] (pronounced like "s" in "pleasure").
One may argue that the Belarusian Lacinka of that time was in a way a transliteration from the Cyrillic-based spelling, which could be close to the truth.
Some manuscripts of the drama and verse kind in Belarusian Lacinka are known from the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century.
www.pravapis.org /art_lac1.asp   (1707 words)

  
 Belarusian language, alphabet and pronunciation
Due to the domination of the Greek Orthodox Church in the region, the written form of Belarusian was heavily influenced by Church Slavonic, the liturgical language of the Orthodox church.
Meanwhile in western Belarus, the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets continued to coexist, though after 1943 the majority of publications were printed in the Cyrillic alphabet.
The first row of each line is the Cyrillic alphabet, the second row is the Latin alphabet (Lacinka), the third row is the standard transliteration and the fourth row is the IPA transcription.
www.omniglot.com /writing/belorussian.htm   (604 words)

  
 Pravapis.org - Belarusian language - Belarusian Alphabet (Cyrillic and Latin)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
This is an introduction to the two Belarusian alphabets: Cyrillics and Lacinka (Latin Script).
In Serbian Cyrillic alphabet there is a special letter for the latter combination: Џџ.
No studies on Lacinka usage and therefore no good estimates on the number of Lacinka users exists because the current government views Cyrillics as the only official alphabet and ignores Lacinka altogether.
www.pravapis.org /art_belarusian_alphabet.asp   (1051 words)

  
 Lacinka alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Łacinka alphabet is the Latin alphabet used previously for writing the Belarusian language.
Texts in the alphabet started to appear in the 16th century.
The Łacinka alphabet developed out of similar Latin alphabets in use in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, which included current-day Belarus, and as such is related to the Polish and Lithuanian alphabets, although it has unique features, most notably the letter ŭ, which is found in neither of those alphabets (though it is used in Esperanto).
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/lacinka_alphabet   (246 words)

  
 Belarus - LANGUAGE, RELIGION, AND CULTURE
The standard literary language, first codified in 1918, is based on the dialect spoken in the central part of the country and is written in the Cyrillic alphabet.
Under Polish influence, a parallel Latin alphabet (lacinka) was used by some writers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and is still used today by some Roman Catholics in Belarus and abroad.
One early proponent of the Belorussian language, poet Frantsishak Bahushyevich (1840-1900), the father of modern Belorussian literature and a participant in the 1863 uprising, was inspired by the fact that many 200- and 300-year-old documents written in Belorussian could be read and understood easily in modern times.
countrystudies.us /belarus/19.htm   (708 words)

  
 Slavic peoples Online Research :: Information about Slavic peoples   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Orthodox/Catholic religious divisions become further exacerbated by the use of the Cyrillic alphabet by the Orthodox and Uniates (Greek Catholics) and of the Roman alphabet by Roman Catholics.
There is also a Latin script to write in Belarusian language, called Lacinka alphabet.
Bosnian language was written in Arabic alphabet until the 20th century.
www.carolinamaps.net /search/Slavs.html   (1658 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Template:Wrongtitle The Łacinka alphabet is the variant of the Latin alphabet which was used for writing the Belarusian language.
Alphabets: Lacinka versus the two Cyrillic forms The complicated history of Belarus (with its many invasions by others) is...
The earliest known printed Belarusian text in the Latin alphabet appeared in Witanie na...
lacinka.iqexpand.com   (474 words)

  
 Lacinka alphabet -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Lacinka alphabet -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
The Łacinka alphabet (лацінка) is the variant of the (The alphabet evolved by the ancient Romans which serves for writing most of the languages of western Europe) Latin alphabet which was used for writing the (Click link for more info and facts about Belarusian language) Belarusian language.
Texts using Łacinka first appeared during the (Click link for more info and facts about 16th century) 16th century.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/l/la/lacinka_alphabet.htm   (128 words)

  
 Ch - Unipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The letter Ch is a letter in Chamorro, Czech, Slovak and Belarusian Lacinka alphabet.
It also used to be a letter in the Spanish alphabet until 1994, but this is no longer the case.
The letter ch is a digraph consisting of the sequence of Latin alphabet graphemes C and H, however it is a single phoneme (pronounced like German ch or X in TeX) and represents a single entity in Czech collation order, inserted between H and I.
www.unipedia.info /Ch.html   (404 words)

  
 Articles - Caron   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
For the fricatives 'sh', 'zh' and the affricate 'ch' only, it can be used in those Finno-Lappic languages which use a Latin alphabet, such as Estonian, Finnish, Karelian and some Sami languages.
The caron is also used in the Romany alphabet.
The Belarusian Lacinka alphabet as well as Bulgarian may also use them at times.
www.anthraxa.com /articles/Caron   (1334 words)

  
 Dictionary of Meaning www.mauspfeil.net
The letter '''Ch''' is a letter in Chamorro language Chamorro, Czech alphabet Czech, Slovak language Slovak and Belarusian language Belarusian Lacinka alphabet.
The letter '''ch''' is a digraph consisting of the sequence of Latin alphabet graphemes C and H, however it is a single phoneme (pronounced like German language German '''ch''' or Chi (Greek letter) X in TeX) and represents a single entity in Czech collation order, inserted between H and I.
In the 15th century, the Czech language used to contain many digraph (orthography) digraphs like modern Polish language Polish does, but most of them were replaced by single letters with diacritic marks by the reform of John Huss, so there is only Ch digraph left in the modern Czech.
www.mauspfeil.net /ch.html   (446 words)

  
 ABM -- The Belarusian Language            
Note: In error, some people use the term Lacinka to refer to "transliterated" Belarusian--a written form of Belarusian using the western alphabet (such as is used for English).
Belarusians from the eastern part of the country (and the surrounding, historical ethnic areas of neighboring countries) often prefer the Cyrillic forms of written Belarusian.
Needless to say, such thinking was (and is) encouraged by the Czarist Russian colonists, and then subsequently, by the Soviet Russian occupiers and by their philosophical descendants of today.
www.belarus-misc.org /bel-ling.htm   (2527 words)

  
 George (band) . Australia . Regurgitator . Concerto for Group and Orchestra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In abstract algebra, a Noetherian ring is a ring mathematics ring that satisfies the ascending chain condition on ideal ring theory ideals.
Short U Ў, ў is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the short semi-vowel in the Belarusian language, pronounced similarly to W in English.
Its equivalent in the Belarusian Latin alphabet Lacinka Łacinka is Ŭŭ.
www.uk.fraquisanto.net /George_(band)   (375 words)

  
 History of Belarus (Great Litva)
In 1696 by decision of the Warsaw General Confederation, the Ruthenian (Old Belarusian) language was replaced by Polish in all official documents of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.
The Latin alphabet (Lacinka) replaced Cyrillic in popular usage.
Old Belarusian was still an official language of courts proceedings in the former lands of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania until mid XVIII century, when it was replaced by Polish and Russian.
www.belarusguide.com /as/history/history.html   (2509 words)

  
 ABM -- Belarusian Alphabets and Transliteration          
Comparison Chart of Belarusian Alphabets and Transliteration -- Go to this page to see a comparison between Cyrillic, Lacinka (Latzinka), their pronunciation, and the Library of Congress (LOC) system of notation.
Note: The four "GIF" graphic files on this page, together with the Cyrillic alphabet graphic file depicted on the previous page, can be downloaded as one "ZIP" (compressed) archive file: ZIP'ed Belarusian alphaphets file.
The term "alphabet" is not used when referring to Latsinka.
www.belarus-misc.org /bel-alpha.htm   (397 words)

  
 Es . Cyrillic alphabet . Scrabble
Belarusian language Belarusian is also written in a Belarusian Latin alphabet Lacinka alphabet Łacinka.
Historically, Belarusian Tatars have written the language in the Arabic alphabet Arabica, and Belarusian Jews in the Hebrew alphabet.
They can gain some nutrition from the mineral content of carbon-based animals including humans, although they...
www.uk.knowledge-info.org /Es   (267 words)

  
 Old Belarusian Poetry
Their most known work in this is "Pryvitannie na pryezd Lutermahra" printed in Vil'na, 1642 written in Lacinka (latin alphabet adopted to Belarusian).
In 1696 by decision of the Warsaw General Confederation, the Rus'ian (Old Belarusian) language was replaced by Polish in all official documents of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.
Old Belarusian was still the language that was used in courts around the lands of GDL until the middle of XVIII century, when it was replaced by Polish and Russian.
www.belarusguide.com /culture1/literature/Old_Poetry.html   (2677 words)

  
 GEONAMES - Alphabets A to B
Abazin / Abaza alphabet - абаза алфавит (abaza alfavit)
Bosnian Cyrillic alphabet - босански алфабет (bosanski alfabet)
Alphabets: A-B - C-E - F-J - K-L - M-Q - R-S - T-Z - Numbers - Fonts
www.geonames.de /alphab.html   (223 words)

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