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Topic: Lady Jane Grey


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  England Under The Tudors: Lady Jane Grey (1537-1554)
LADY JANE GREY, a lady remarkable no less for her accomplishments than for her misfortunes, was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII of England.
Lady Jane, the subject of this article, was the eldest of three whom the Marquess had by Lady Frances.
Lady Jane and her husband Lord Guilford Dudley were also tried, and received sentence of death for treason.
www.luminarium.org /encyclopedia/ladyjanegrey.htm   (1325 words)

  
  Lady Jane Grey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lady Jane had a reputation as one of the most learned women of her day, and the historical writer Alison Weir describes her as one of "the finest female minds of the century".
Jane's claim to the throne came through her mother, Lady Frances Brandon, the daughter of Mary Tudor (herself a daughter of King Henry VII of England) and of her second husband, Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk.
Lady Jane (1986), with Helena Bonham Carter in the title-role
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lady_Jane_Grey   (2130 words)

  
 Tudor Herstory: Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey, eldest daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Suffolk and great-neice of Henry VIII, was born in October of 1537 only shortly after her cousin Edward VI.
Jane's council was abandoning her one by one in hopes of saving their lives and the people were refusing to arm against Mary in support of Jane.
Jane Grey went down in history as the Nine Day Queen, a poor girl used and victimized as a result of the ambitions of her parents and in-laws.
tudorherstory.tripod.com /janegrey.html   (883 words)

  
 photo6 Page
Lady Jane Grey was the eldest child of Lord Henry and Lady Frances Grey, the duke and duchess of Suffolk.
Lady Jane and her husband were tried and convicted of high treason on November 14, "to be burnt alive or beheaded, as the queen shall please" and both Lady Jane and Guildford were beheaded on February 12, 1554; her father was beheaded a few days later on February 23.
Lady Jane was not ignorant to the fact, that she lived in a male dominate world, and for her to give the title King to Guildford, would be causing much confusion and discourse in her court.
www.ladyjanegrey-dudley.50megs.com /photo6.html   (6475 words)

  
 Search Results for "Lady Jane Grey"
She was the daughter of Henry Grey, marquess of Dorset (later duke of Suffolk), and Frances Brandon, daughter...
He supported, for a time, the claims of Lady Jane Grey to the throne, and in 1554 he was tried for complicity in...
Lady Jane Grey was his daughter, and, upon the death (1553) of Edward,...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Lady+Jane+Grey   (325 words)

  
 About Jane GREY (Queen of England)
Lady Jane's father was Henry Grey, third Marquess of Dorset, the son of Thomas Grey, second Marquess of Dorset.
Lady Jane was born in the same year and the same month - the exact date in Oct 1537 is not recorded - as Edward VI, Henry's son by his third wife, Jane Seymour.
Jane, who thought fine clothes were sinful, tried to refuse the gift, saying it would be "a shame to follow my Lady Mary against God's word," but her parents insisted she wear it in the hope that it would impress the King.
www.tudorplace.com.ar /aboutJaneGrey.htm   (8007 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey - MSN Encarta
Lady Jane Grey (1537-1554), queen of England for nine days, born in Bradgate Park, near Leicester, a great-granddaughter of King Henry VII and daughter of Henry Grey, duke of Suffolk and 3rd marquess of Dorset.
When Lady Jane was 15 years old, England's powerful lord chamberlain John Dudley, duke of Northumberland, arranged a marriage for her with his son, Guildford Dudley.
Lady Jane was subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761555398/Grey_Lady_Jane.html   (204 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey's Clocks
Jane's father was Henry Grey, Marquis of Dorset and her mother Frances, was the eldest daughter of Henry VIII's younger sister Mary, who had been Queen of France, then became the third wife of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk.
Jane would have had the opportunity of meeting such visitors as she was now part of the cliche of intellectual ladies gathered around the Duchess of Northumberland and her daughters at the Court.
Jane, not her mother or the King's sisters - ahead of her in the line-up, was now the direct heir to the throne, in a device of disputed legality, signed by reluctant but loyal subjects of the King who felt bound to obey his last wishes.
homepage.ntlworld.com /heather.hobden1/LadyJaneGreyClocks.htm   (3885 words)

  
 ::Lady Jane Grey::
Lady Jane Grey was born in October 1537 and died in February 1554.
Lady Jane is most remembered as the "Nine Day Queen" before Mary Tudor was confirmed as queen in 1553 after the death of her half-brother Edward VI.
Jane’s father was Henry Grey, who was to become the Duke of Suffolk, and her mother was Lady Frances Brandon, who was the daughter of Henry VIII’s sister Mary and the great grand-daughter of Henry VII.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /lady_jane_grey.htm   (745 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey: Biography, Portraits, Primary Sources
Lady Jane Grey was the eldest child of Lord Henry and Lady Frances Grey, the duke and duchess of Suffolk.
Jane had protested the union but was persuaded by 'the urgency of her mother and the violence of her father'; in other words, persuaded by verbal and physical abuse.
She informed the Greys that Edward VI was dying and Jane had been made heir to his throne; she must hold herself in readiness (in other words, come to the Dudley home.) Jane later said this was the first she knew of the king's impending death.
englishhistory.net /tudor/relative/janegrey.html   (12779 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey Bibliography
His depiction of Jane Grey continues the Victorian hagiographic tradition that portrays her as a weak and submissive young woman, in large part because Mr Davey was himself a product of the Victorian era that constructed "Woman" as an idealized form.
Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk.
The works and her portrayal of Jane Grey are entertaining, but must be read with a vigilant awareness of the time and place in which they were written and the social and cultural agenda that they serve.
www.somegreymatter.com /janegreybiblio.htm   (2861 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days as Queen
Once inside the tower, Jane was taken to the presence- chamber, where she took her place under the state canopy.
Jane herself thought she was being poisoned by the Duchess of Northumberland (her husband's mother), but there was no evidence this really occurred.
Jane however was very distressed by this idea and insisted he must stay, alarmed for her own safety.
www.ladyjanegrey.org /nine_days/index.html   (1050 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey: Biography, Portraits, Primary Sources
Lady Jane Grey was the eldest child of Lord Henry and Lady Frances Grey, the duke and duchess of
Jane had protested the union but was persuaded by 'the urgency of her mother and the violence of her father'; in other words, persuaded by verbal and physical abuse.
She informed the Greys that Edward VI was dying and Jane had been made heir to his throne; she must hold herself in readiness (in other words, come to the Dudley home.) Jane later said this was the first she knew of the king's impending death.
www.englishhistory.net /tudor/relative/janegrey.html   (12741 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey - Encyclopedia FunTrivia
Jane's body was left exposed on the scaffold for 4 hours while Dr Feckenham sought permission for her to be buried in the Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula.
Lady Jane was the grand-neice of Henry VIII through her maternal line.
Lady Jane's lady-in-waiting gave her gloves and handkerchief to her before she was beheaded.
www.funtrivia.com /en/People/Lady-Jane-Grey-10424.html   (648 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey or Catherine Parr?
The only known contemporary portrait of Lady Jane Grey, Queen of England for nine days, is not her at all, experts at the National Gallery have concluded.
Sir Roy, director of the gallery from 1967 to 1973, concluded that it was a contemporary portrait of Lady Jane Grey painted in 1547.
Lady Jane Grey, although of royal blood, was a relatively obscure child of eight when this was painted; it was to be another eight years before her disasterous and short-lived reign.
www.britannia.com /history/ladyjane/portrait.html   (655 words)

  
 Jane Grey
The true tragedy of Jane Grey is that her death was through no fault of her own, but of the unfortunate fact of her heritage and of her religion.
Her ambitious parents (Frances Brandon and Henry Grey), along with John Dudley, father of her husband, Guilford Dudley, sought to keep a Protestant monarch on the throne if Edward were to die without an heir of his body and to have that monarch under their thumbs.
Jane and her husband were held in the Tower of London but were not executed until after a second ill-fated uprising in their name.
www.tudorhistory.org /jane   (222 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Lady Jane Grey was born in October of 1537, the same month as Prince Edward.
Queen Jane had continued to hold audiences and began her plans to bring a rigid form of Protestantism to the Church of England, but by the 19th she heard the cheers of the city and the peeling of bells and could not have assumed they were for her.
Jane had written Mary a letter giving an account of her nine days as queen and made no excuses for herself only expressing regret that she had accepted the crown.
home.earthlink.net /~elisale/janegrey.html   (1461 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen: Books: Alison Plowden   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Indeed, Jane Grey remains a shadowy figure, even with this and other biographies available, given that, as a child, she was not party to much life at court, and did not have ongoing correspondence with many people likely to preserve such writing (only a handful of personal letters remain from her).
Lady Jane Grey was not born to be queen.
Lady Jane fell victim again to the problems of politics; Mary Tudor, once queen, was inclined to be lenient until it was felt that Jane's presence continued to be a rallying point for Protestant dissidents.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0750928166?v=glance   (1682 words)

  
 BBC - History - Lady Jane Grey (1537 - 1554)
Jane was nominal queen of England for just nine days in 1553 in an unsuccessful bid to prevent the accession of the Catholic Mary Tudor.
Jane was born in the autumn of 1537, the daughter of the Marquess of Dorset.
Jane pleaded guilty and was sentenced to death.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/historic_figures/grey_lady_jane.shtml   (348 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Lady Jane Grey - Queen for Nine Days
Jane was happy with the Seymours, but Katherine soon died died and Thomas Seymour was arrested, forcing Jane to return to her parents.
Jane, who thought fine clothes were sinful, tried to refuse the gift, saying it would be "a shame to follow my Lady Mary against God's word," but her parents insisted she wear it in the hope that it would impress the king.
During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, Lady Jane was regarded as a martyr because she had died for the Protestant faith.
www.royalty.nu /Europe/England/Tudor/JaneGrey.html   (1577 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey, a lady remarkable no less for her accomplishments than for her misfortunes, was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII of England.
Lady Jane was the eldest of three whom the marquess had by Lady Frances.
Lady Jane and her husband Lord Guilford Dudley were also tried, and received sentence of death for treason.
www.nndb.com /people/016/000086755   (1172 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey
Jane Grey was an abused girl who led a sad life with a tragic ending.
Jane was incredibly intelligent, and spent most of her life in scholarly pursuits.
Jane was in many respects similar to her cousin Mary "Bloody Mary" Tudor: both women were deeply religious and politically naïve; both women displayed a depth of religious intolerance that was extreme even by the standards of the 16th century.
www.spookbot.com /jane.htm   (2061 words)

  
 The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum : Possibly Lady Jane Grey by Eworth
The eldest, Lady Jane, was preceded in rank by only her mother and the Princesses Mary and Elizabeth.
Jane herself recounts a later illness caused, she claimed, by her new mother-in-law attempting to poison in June of 1553, resulting in all of her hair falling out.
Jane’s adherence to the reformed religion and her readings of the works of continental reformers, coupled with her correspondence with those reformers, inculcated within her an austere taste in dress.
www.bitterwisdom.com /ladyjanegrey/stephan/3.html   (1656 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey and her husband were imprisoned in the Tower.
Jane's death warrant was signed by Queen Mary later known as 'Bloody Mary' for her persecution of Protestants.
Lady Jane Grey was the daughter of Henry Grey and Frances Brandon (the Duke and Duchess of Suffolk)
www.elizabethan-era.org.uk /lady-jane-grey.htm   (1031 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey is known for her brief reign as Queen of England during the mid-16th century.
Jane Grey was known for her outstanding scholastic abilities, and for her devotion to the reformed Protestant religion.
Lady Jane showed great courage on the scaffold, and will be long remembered for her dignity and strength of character in the face of adversity.
www.royalpaperdolls.com /LadyJaneGreyDollPage.htm   (1250 words)

  
 Lady Jane Grey
Jane Grey, the daughter of Henry Grey, the Marquess of Dorset, was born in 1537.
During the final illness of Edward VI, Jane Grey was married to Guildford Dudley, fourth son of
Jane Grey was declared queen three days after Edward's death.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /TUDgreyL.htm   (262 words)

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