Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Lagoon Nebula


Related Topics
M55

In the News (Sat 16 Dec 17)

  
  Emission Nebulae
An equilibrium is established in a typical emission nebula when the temperature equivalent of this kinetic motion is between 7000 K and 20,000 K. For a typical emission nebulae, the density of ions (and electrons) is 1.0E8 to 1.0E10 particles per m^3.
Some of the most famous and beautiful of the emission nebulae visible from the Northern Hemisphere are the Orion Nebula (M42, the Messier catalog number), the Lagoon Nebula (M8), and the Trifid Nebula (M20).
The Lagoon Nebula is a very large nebula which has distinct bright rims and small dark clouds projected onto its brightest parts.
fusedweb.pppl.gov /CPEP/Chart_Pages/5.Plasmas/Nebula/Emission.html   (459 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Lagoon Nebula, bright nebula in the constellation Sagittarius, centred approximately at right ascension 18h 04m, declination -24° 23′.
Nebula, a localized mass of the gases and finely divided dust particles that are spread throughout interstellar space.
Courland Lagoon, inlet of the Baltic Sea, along the coast of the Lithuania and the Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia.
au.encarta.msn.com /Lagoon_Nebula.html   (94 words)

  
 HubbleSite - NewsCenter - Giant "Twisters" and Star Wisps in the Lagoon Nebula (01/22/1997) - Introduction
in the heart of the Lagoon Nebula (M8) which lies 5,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.
The hot, central star, O Herschel 36 [upper left], is the primary source of the illuminating light for the brightest region in the nebula, called the Hourglass.
The glare from this hot star is eroding the clouds by heating the hydrogen gas in them [seen as a blue "mist" at the right of the image].
hubblesite.org /newscenter/archive/releases/1996/38   (136 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula (M8, NGC 6523)
A diffuse nebula in the constellation Sagittarius that is divided by a dark lane; it extends over a patch of sky 3 x 1.3 times the apparent diameter of the Moon.
Within the brightest part of the Lagoon is a figure-eight feature known as the Hourglass Nebula, discovered by John Herschel and associated with a number of hot young stars, including Herschel 36 (magnitude 9.5, spectral type O7).
As so often with diffuse nebulae, a cluster of young stars that formed from the nebula’s material was discovered first – in this case the open cluster NGC 6530 in the eastern half of M8.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/L/Lagoon_Nebula.html   (315 words)

  
 APOD Search Results for "Lagoon"
This spectacular portion of the Lagoon Nebula taken by the CFHT was created from light emitted by hydrogen (shown in red) and light emitted by oxygen (shown in green).
The greater nebula, also known as M8 and NGC 6523, is named "Lagoon" for the band of dust seen to the left of the open cluster's center.
The nebula, also known as M8 and NGC 6523, is named "Lagoon" for the band of dust seen to the left of the open cluster's center.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Lagoon   (3959 words)

  
 M-8
M-8, "The Lagoon", is a bright nebula, with an associated star cluster, in the Constellation Sagittarius.
The redness of the surrounding emission nebula gas is caused by electrons recombining with hydrogen nuclei, while the dark regions are dust lanes that absorb light from background sources.
Within the brightest part of the Lagoon is a figure-eight feature known as the Hourglass Nebula (see HST images), discovered by John Herschel and associated with a number of hot young stars, including Herschel 36 (magnitude 9.5, spectral type O7).
www.kopernik.org /images/archive/m8.htm   (452 words)

  
 Giant "Twisters" in the Lagoon Nebula
This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image reveals a pair of one-half light-year long interstellar "twisters" -- eerie funnels and twisted-rope structures -- in the heart of the Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) which lies 5,000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.
The central hot star, O Herschel 36 (lower right), is the primary source of the ionizing radiation for the brightest region in the nebula, called the Hourglass.
The Lagoon Nebula and nebulae in other galaxies are sites where new stars are being born from dusty molecular clouds.
www.solarviews.com /cap/ds/lagoon1.htm   (344 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula M8
Lagoon Nebula M8 The Heavens Declare His Glory...
These are photographs of M8, the Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius.
This photo of the Lagoon nebula was taken by me on August 5, 2005.
members.cox.net /quantum-singularity/lagoon.htm   (100 words)

  
 [No title]
a strong broadband light component to the nebula; within and surrounding the entire nebula are masses of tiny dust particles which reflect the starlight generally, and blue light particularly.
This can be seen most clearly in the northen part of the nebula where the hydrogen gas has become exhausted and only the dust remains to reflect the light from the hot young stars, most especially the bright magnitude 7.3 star in the centre of the blue reflection region.
known as the Lagoon Nebula, is at the lower portion of the photograph.
lycos.cs.cmu.edu /info/nebula--lagoon-nebula.html   (431 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
The Lagoon Nebula is a cluster with nebula which is located in the constellation Sagittarius.
The Lagoon Nebula is located at 18 03.8 right ascension and -24 23 declination.
This Cluster with Nebula has an apparent angular size of 60 x 35 and a visual brightness of 6.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /nebulas/lagoon.htm   (75 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula Comparison Table   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
An H II region, a supernova remnant, or a planetary nebula.
H II regions have an emission-line optical spectrum, and a thermal continuous spectrum declining in intensity as the wavelength increases (from maximum in the ultraviolet) through infrared and radio.
An emission nebula in Sagittarius 2 kpc distant.
www.site.uottawa.ca:4321 /astronomy/LagoonNebula_table.html   (149 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
The Trifid Nebula, at the upper right, is the perfect example of the two types of diffuse nebula.
the brightest white portion of the nebula; these are the stars forming from the gas in the Lagoon.
This is a young cluster of stars formed in a vast cloud of gas like the Lagoon Nebula.
www.darkskyimages.com /lagoon.html   (253 words)

  
 Above the clouds » Lagoon nebula (NGC6523)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
Located in the constellation Sagittarius.The Lagoon nebula shines at a mag 6.0,which makes it quite easy to find even under moderately light polluted skies.Like the Swan nebula,it appears as a ghostly gray smudge to the observer.
One of the remarkable features of the Lagoon Nebula is the presence of dark nebulae known as ‘globules’;  which are collapsing protostellar clouds with diameters of about 10,000 AU (Astronomical Units).
Closely by this feature is the apparently brightest of the stars associated with the Lagoon Nebula, 9 Sagittarii (mag 5.97, spectral class O5), which surely contributes a lot of the high energy radiation which excites the nebula to shine.
bongo69.vela.net /2006/06/09/lagoon-nebula-ngc6523   (370 words)

  
 The Black Magic Project - The Triffid and Lagoon Nebulae
Both nebulae are bright objects that can be seen from the southern hemisphere and equatorial lattitudes of Earth with the naked eye, and their warm luminous gas and dust clouds provide the human settlers of Sagittarius with a reassuring glow.
The Triffid Nebula is the smaller of the two bright objects, and is located near the top of the image.
The Lagoon Nebula is the larger object at the bottom.
www.fissionpark.com /Reactor/blackmagic/triffid_lagoon.html   (584 words)

  
 lagoon
Trifid Nebula M20 and Lagoon Nebula M8 During warm summer nights, low in the southern sky, the constellation Sagittarius hovers over the trees near the horizon.
Both the Trifid and Lagoon Nebulas are part of the same cloud of gas harboring star formation, 5200 light-years away.
Dark globules within the Lagoon Nebula are collapsing protostellar clouds.
www.stardoctor.org /lagoon.html   (162 words)

  
 Messier Object 8
The Lagoon Nebula Messier 8 (M8, NGC 6523) is one of the finest and brightest star-forming regions in the sky.
One of the remarkable features of the Lagoon Nebula is the presence of dark nebulae known as 'globules' (Burnham) [see expanded image] which are collapsing protostellar clouds with diameters of about 10,000 AU (Astronomical Units).
The Lagoon Nebula is a magnificient object for the amateur astrophotographer, as Brad Wallis and Robert Provin have demonstrated with their outstanding images, and Dr.
www.seds.org /messier/m/m008.html   (877 words)

  
 The Lagoon Nebula, M8, NGC 6523   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
The Lagoon nebula is an illuminated part of such a dark ('molecular') cloud and it reveals the dust as dark lanes and globules silhouetted against the luminous gas.
Within the nebula is the scattered young star cluster NGC 6530, recently formed from this material, though the centre of star-forming activity has now shifted westwards from the cluster to the brightest part of the nebula, around the tiny Hourglass Nebula.
The lagoon nebula is visible to the unaided eye on southern winter nights.
www.aao.gov.au /images/captions/uks005.html   (180 words)

  
 M8 The Lagoon Nebula
From a dark site, the Lagoon Nebula is visible to the unaided eye as a small bright patch above the large Sagittarius star cloud in the Milky Way.
Taking it's name from the dark lane that runs through the center of the nebula, just to the west of open cluster NGC 6530, the Lagoon nebula is a beautiful sight in any size telescope.
The nebula complex NGC 6559 is to the east of M8, and contains dark nebulae B91 and B303, as well as bright nebulae IC 4684, 4685 and IC 1274/5.
www.astropix.com /HTML/D_SUM_S/M8.HTM   (196 words)

  
 M8 The Lagoon Nebula (NGC6532 and NGC6530) Film Astrophotography
This is a beautiful diffuse nebula which gets its name from its figure of a tropical island surrounded by a coral reef.
The central hot star, O Herschel 36 (upper left), is the primary source of the ionizing radiation for the brightest region in the nebula, called the Hourglass.
The ionizing radiation induces photo-evaporation of the surfaces of the clouds (seen as a blue "mist" at the right of the image), and drives away violent stellar winds tearing into the cool clouds.
www.petesastrophotography.com /gallery/M8/M8.html   (324 words)

  
 Stargazer Online || Lagoon & Trifid Nebula
The Lagoon (M8) and Trifid Nebula (M20) region is easily my favorite section of the sky to observe; be it with a telescope, binoculars, or the naked eye.
The Lagoon and Trifid are almost certainly part of the same vast complex.
Their distances are practically the same; the Lagoon is about 5,200 light-years away and the Trifid is 5,000 light-years distant.
www.richardbell.net /Astrophotos/lagoon.html   (194 words)

  
 M8 - Lagoon Nebula
At the heart of the nebula is the very bright region known as the "Hourglass," visible in this image as a tiny white hourglass-shaped region near the center of the nebula.
The Lagoon Nebula is about 5,200 light-years from the solar system and is contains the open cluster NGC 6530, seen here to the left of the Hourglass.
The nebula contains numerous dark regions known as Bok globules, which are regions of dust and gas collapsing into protostellar clouds.
webpages.charter.net /alsonwongweb/m8-lagoo.htm   (191 words)

  
 M8 - Lagoon Nebula
The Lagoon Nebula M8 is a straightforward emission nebula.
M8, the Lagoon Nebula, is located a few degrees to then north of the spout of the "teapot" which forms the constellation Sagittarius, and to the west of the main milky way stream.
In the eastern part of the nebula the loose galactic star cluster NGC 6530 is located, which is about 10' in diameter.
astro.nightsky.at /Photo/Neb/M8_M20_WN_detail1.html   (703 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Lagoon Nebula (Astronomy, General) - Encyclopedia
It is visible to the naked eye and has an angular area larger than that of the full moon.
The central parts are extremely bright, and some stars can be seen embedded in the nebulosity.
Because of the nebula's large size, light from its stars cannot illuminate all of the associated interstellar gas and dust.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/L/LagoonNe.html   (200 words)

  
 Lagoon Nebula (M8) June 29, 2002
The Lagoon Nebula itself was discovered by Le Gentil in 1747.
Diffuse nebulae are clouds of interstellar matter, namely thin but widespread agglomerations of gas and dust.
The cluster, NGC6530 is an extremely young open cluster which was formed from the material of the Lagoon Nebula, and it is situated well within this diffuse nebula.
www.whiteoaks.com /sketches/lagoon.html   (190 words)

  
 M8 - The Lagoon Nebula
M8 - The Lagoon Nebula is located in the constellation Sagittarius.
More information about this nebula can be found at the Messier Index - M8 and at the Web Nebulae - M8.
The above color image is a composite image created using a monochrome ccd image (shown below) as the luminance of the composite and a color film image (shown at the bottom of this page) as the chrominance of the composite.
www.astroimages.org /ccd/m8.html   (144 words)

  
 M8 - Lagoon Nebula - Sagittarius
It takes the name Lagoon Nebula from the darker semi-circle which surrounds the bright central region.
It is a vast and complex area of ionized hydrogen gas which is fuelled by many hot young stars, most notably the 5.9 magnitude star 9 Sagittarii, fuelling the bright central portion of this photo, which is also a star forming region.
M8 is one of the brightest nebulae in the night sky and is a wonderful sight in anything from binoculars upwards.
www.astrocruise.com /m8.htm   (226 words)

  
 HubbleSite - NewsCenter - Giant "Twisters" and Star Wisps in the Lagoon Nebula (01/22/1997) - Release Images
This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image reveals a pair of one-half light-year long interstellar "twisters" — eerie funnels and twisted-rope structures — in the heart of the Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) which lies 5,000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.
The central hot O type star, Herschel 36 (lower right), is the primary source of the ionizing radiation for the brightest region in the nebula, called the Hourglass.
The Lagoon Nebula and nebulae in other galaxies are sites where new stars are being born from dusty molecular clouds.
www.hubblesite.org /newscenter/archive/releases/1996/38/image/b   (398 words)

  
 ESA - Space Science - Exploring space - Lagoon Nebula (NGC 6523 or M8)
ESA - Space Science - Exploring space - Lagoon Nebula (NGC 6523 or M8)
This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a pair of half a light-year long interstellar 'twisters' - eerie twisted funnel structures - in the heart of the Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) which lies 5000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.
Why are things in space the shape that they are?
www.esa.int /esaSC/SEM5PXV4QWD_exploring_1.html   (75 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.