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Topic: Lagrangian mechanics


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In the News (Mon 24 Jun 19)

  
  Lagrangian mechanics
Lagrangian mechanics is a re-formulation of classical mechanics introduced by Joseph Louis Lagrange in 1788.
In Lagrangian mechanics, the trajectory of an object is derived by finding the path which minimizes the action, a quantity which is the integral of the Lagrangian over time.
The Lagrangian for classical mechanics is taken to be the difference between the kinetic energy and the potential energy.
www.mcfly.org /Lagrangian_mechanics   (934 words)

  
  Lagrangian mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lagrangian mechanics is a re-formulation of classical mechanics introduced by Joseph Louis Lagrange in 1788.
In Lagrangian mechanics, the trajectory of an object is derived by finding the path which minimizes the action, a quantity which is the integral of the Lagrangian over time.
The Lagrangian for classical mechanics is taken to be the difference between the kinetic energy and the potential energy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lagrangian_mechanics   (926 words)

  
 Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics
The equivalence between the Lagrangian equation of motion (for conservative systems) and the conservation of energy is a general consequence of the fact that the kinetic energy of a particle is strictly proportional to the square of the particle's velocity.
The correspondence between the conservation of energy and the Lagrangian equations of motion suggests that there might be a convenient variational formulation of mechanics in terms of the total energy E = T + V (as opposed to the Lagrangian L = T - V).
The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics are also notable for the fact that they express the laws of mechanics without reference to any particular coordinate system for the configuration space.
www.mathpages.com /home/kmath523/kmath523.htm   (1247 words)

  
 Hamiltonian mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hamiltonian mechanics is a re-formulation of classical mechanics that was invented in 1833 by William Rowan Hamilton.
It arose from Lagrangian mechanics, another re-formulation of classical mechanics, introduced by Joseph Louis Lagrange in 1788.
However, the steps leading to the equations of motion are more onerous than in Lagrangian mechanics - beginning with the generalized coordinates and the Lagrangian, we must calculate the Hamiltonian, express each generalized velocity in terms of the conjugate momenta, and replace the generalized velocities in the Hamiltonian with the conjugate momenta.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hamiltonian_mechanics   (1197 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Lagrangian mechanics
In physics, classical mechanics or Newtonian mechanics is one of the two major sub-fields of study in the science of mechanics, which is concerned with the set of physical laws governing and mathematically describing the motions of bodies and aggregates of bodies.
A Lagrangian of a dynamical system, named after Joseph Louis Lagrange, is a function of the dynamical variables and concisely describes the equations of motion of the system.
In this context, the Lagrangian is usually taken to be the kinetic energy of a mechanical system minus its potential energy.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Lagrangian-mechanics   (567 words)

  
 Lagrangian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Examples of Lagrangian dynamical systems range from the (classical version of the) Standard Model, to Newton's equations, to purely mathematical problems such as geodesic equations and Plateau's problem.
The concept of a Lagrangian was originally introduced in a reformulation of classical mechanics known as Lagrangian mechanics.
The Lagrangian density for quantum chromodynamics is [1] [2] [3]
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lagrangian   (875 words)

  
 Lagrangian mechanics: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Lagrangian mechanics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In Lagrangian mechanics, the trajectory of an object is derived by finding the path which minimizes the action[?] which is the sum of the Lagrangian over time; this being the kinetic energy minus the potential energy.
There are many fewer equations since one is not directly calculating the influence of the hoop on the bead at a given moment.
It is a particularly ubiquitous quantity in quantum mechanics.
www.encyclopedian.com /la/Lagrangian-mechanics.html   (922 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The foundations of classical mechanics were first established during the seventeenth century by Newton and Galileo; this approach is called Newtonian mechanics.
The Lagrangian formulation is cast in terms of kinetic and potential energies, that involve only scalar functions, and the philosophical belief is that the physical universe follows paths through time and space that are extrema.
A thorough knowledge of classical mechanics is essential to a full understanding of physics as well as providing an introduction to powerful new mathematical methods that underlie many branches of physics.
www.pas.rochester.edu /~cline/P235/Subjectmatter.htm   (514 words)

  
 Consciousness studies:The philosophical problem - Appendixs - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
The eighteenth century approach is known as Lagrangian mechanics (devised by Joseph Lagrange between 1772 and 1788).
Lagrangian mechanics concentrates on the energy exchanges during motion rather than on the forces involved.
Lagrangian mechanics gave rise to Hamiltonian mechanics (devised by William Hamilton 1833).
en.wikibooks.org /wiki/Consciousness_studies:The_philosophical_problem_-_Appendixs   (1232 words)

  
 Talk:Lagrangian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lagrangian, Lagrangian mechanics and Action (physics) all contain duplicate material!
If no one objects, I'll add the content of this page to Lagrangian mechanics and set up a redirect here.
By the only definition of functional I know, it is indeed the action, not the Lagrangian that is a functional.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Lagrangian   (281 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
] Equations of motion of a mechanical system for which a classical (non-quantum-mechanical) description is suitable, and which relate the kinetic energy of the system to the generalized coordinates, the generalized forces, and the time.
The difference between the kinetic energy and the potential energy of a system of particles, expressed as a function of generalized coordinates and velocities from which Lagrange's equations can be derived.
For a dynamical system of fields, a function which plays the same role as the Lagrangian of a system of particles; its integral over a time interval is a maximum or a minimum with respect to infinitesimal variations of the fields, provided the initial and final fields are held fixed.
www.accessscience.com /Dictionary/L/L2/DictL2.html   (2588 words)

  
 Lagrange
In 1788 he published Mécanique Analytique or Analytical Mechanics this book was and will always be considered a mathematical masterpiece, which summarized all the work done in the field of mechanics since the time of Newton and is notable for its use of the theory of differential equations.
The integral of the Lagrangian system has been called the "action" of a system and is given the symbol S.
Lagrangian Polynomial is another method that Lagrange made.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/199900/biolagra.htm   (899 words)

  
 Fetecau, Razvan Constantin (2003-05-14) Variational methods for nonsmooth mechanics. ...
In this thesis we investigate nonsmooth classical and continuum mechanics and its discretizations by means of variational numerical and geometric methods.
The theory of smooth Lagrangian mechanics is extended to a nonsmooth context appropriate for collisions and it is shown in what sense the system is symplectic and satisfies a Noether-style momentum conservation theorem.
Discretizations of this nonsmooth mechanics are developed by using the methodology of variational discrete mechanics.
resolver.caltech.edu /CaltechETD:etd-05222003-110241   (216 words)

  
 PhilSci Archive - Between Laws and Models: Some Philosophical Morals of Lagrangian Mechanics
Another main moral concerns ontology: the ontology of Lagrangian mechanics is both more subtle and more problematic than philosophers often realize.
The treatment of Lagrangian mechanics provides an introduction to the subject for philosophers, and is technically elementary.
In particular, it is confined to systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom, and for the most part eschews modern geometry.
philsci-archive.pitt.edu /archive/00001937   (181 words)

  
 Idle Theory: Least Action Principles
This Principle is indeed one of the greatest generalizations in all physical science, although not fully appreciated until the advent of quantum mechanics in the present century.
Feynman's formulation of quantum mechanics is based on a least-action principle, using path integrals.
Newton's mechanics is contained in Hamilton's principle of least action, and also Gauss's principle of least constraint.
ourworld.compuserve.com /homepages/cuius/idle/evolution/ref/leastact.html   (809 words)

  
 Classical mechanics:Lagrangian - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
In Newtonian mechanics, a mechanical system is always made up of point masses or rigid bodies, and these are subject to known forces.
This may appear to be similar to the familiar condition for the mechanical equilibrium: the coordinates x,y,z are such that the potential energy has the minimum value.
The basic rule is that the Lagrangian is equal to the kinetic energy minus the potential energy.
en.wikibooks.org /wiki/Classical_mechanics:Lagrangian   (2633 words)

  
 Lagrangian Mechanics
If the Lagrangian does not explicitly depend on time, then the Hamiltonian does not explicitly depend on time and H is a constant of motion.
So only if Lagrangian does not explicitly depend on time and the generalized coordinates do not explicitly depend on time, then H = T + U = E and the energy is a constant of motion.
Assume you have chosen coordinate for a system that are not independent, but are connected by m equations of constraints of the form
electron6.phys.utk.edu /phys594/Tools/mechanics/summary/lagrangian/lagrangian.htm   (567 words)

  
 Lagrangian and Hamiltonian field theories
For example, classical mechanics is a field theory in this sense: time is the independent variable and the coordinates defining the system configuration are the fields, and then the Euler-Lagrange equations constitute the field equations.
In relativistic field theory, though, this equivalence is lost since the Lagrangian of the system usually fails to satisfy some regularity conditions owing to the requirement of general covariance.
For the same reason the Lagrangian formulation is naturally tailored to describe (classical) fields in flat or curved space-time, including gravity itself.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/Sciences/Physics/Mechanics/Lagrangian/lagrangian/lagrangian.htm   (529 words)

  
 Geometric Mechanics, Lagrangian Reduction, and Nonholonomic Systems   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
This paper surveys selected recent progress in geometric mechanics, focussing on Lagrangian reduction and gives some new applications to nonholonomic systems, that is, mechanical systems with constraints typified by rolling without slipping.
The modern vision of mechanics includes, besides the traditional mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, field theories such as electromagnetism, fluid mechanics, plasma physics, solid mechanics as well as quantum mechanics, and relativistic theories, including gravity.
Symmetries in mechanics ranges from obvious translational and rotational symmetries to less obvious particle relabeling symmetries in fluids and plasmas, to subtle symmetries underlying integrable systems.
www.cds.caltech.edu /~marsden/bib/2001/01-CeMaRa2001a   (291 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Action (physics)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Although equivalent in classical mechanics with Newton's laws, the action principle is better suited for generalizations and plays an important role in modern physics.
Feynman's formulation of quantum mechanics is based on a stationary-action principle, using path integrals.
In Lagrangian mechanics, the trajectory of an object is derived by finding the path for which the action integral S is stationary (a minimum or a saddle point).
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Action_(physics)   (1656 words)

  
 Lagrangian
In physics, the Lagrangian of a system, denoted L, is the kinetic energy minus the potential energy:L = T - V(T-V is a Lagrangian - it isn't unique)This quantity is important in Lagrangian mechanics: see principle of least action.
In physics, the Lagrangian of a system, denoted L, is the kinetic energy minus the potential energy:
(T-V is a Lagrangian - it isn't unique) This quantity is important in Lagrangian mechanics: see principle of least action.
www.termsdefined.net /la/lagrangian.html   (294 words)

  
 712 - Lagrangian- and Hamiltonian Mechanics
This course skills the student in the techniques and use of Lagrangian- and Hamiltonian Mechanics.
This course is the basis of all further courses in classical mechanics and also lays the foundation for more advanced courses in quantum mechanics.
The formulation of classical mechanics from a very general viewpoint in terms of generalized coordinates etc; conservation laws and their relation with Hamilton and Lagrange formalisms and symmetries; the analyses and approximation of many-body systems through normal modes; Lagrange and Hamilton mechanics as a formal basis of quantum mechanics.
www.sun.ac.za /physics/modules/hons_physics/712_e.htm   (133 words)

  
 Just Enough Classical Mechanics
Quantum mechanics was derived from the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of classical mechanics, and uses much of their terminology and conventions.
Note that Lagrangian mechanics does not replace Newton’s Laws, but provides (as we shall see) a method for writing down a set of second-order differential equations to describe the motion of even a very complicated system simply and surely.
Using the Lagrangian formulation, electromechanical systems can be analyzed in an integrated manner, defining space coordinates and momenta for the mechanical components, and charge and current for the electrical parts.
www.phys.washington.edu /users/jeff/courses/old/441U/1998/classmec.html   (2907 words)

  
 More on Lagrangian Mechanics
Here is free textual content related to Lagrangian Mechanics to utilize on your web site in accordance wi th the GNU license.
This is because appropriate generalized coordinates qi may be chosen to exploit symmetries in the system.
Let q0 and q1 be the coordinates at respective initial and final times t0 and t1.
www.artilifes.com /lagrangian-mechanics.htm   (1195 words)

  
 Analytical Mechanics - Johns
Advanced topics such as covariant Lagrangians and Hamiltonians, canonical transformations, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods are simplified by the use of this extended theory.
Classical mechanics itself is presented with an emphasis on methods, such as linear vector operators and dyadics, that will familiarize the student with similar techniques in quantum theory.
Graduate students preparing for research careers will find a graduate mechanics course based on this book to be an essential bridge between their undergraduate training and advanced study in analytical mechanics, relativity, and quantum mechanics.
www.metacosmos.org   (399 words)

  
 Biography of Lagrange
In 1788 he published Mécanique Analytique, which summarized all the work done in the field of mechanics since the time of Newton and is notable for its use of the theory of differential equations.
As I have mentioned before he created something called the Lagrangian Mechanics which is based on Newton's Equations of Motion.
Lagrange won an award for the best essay on the liberation of the moon with his analysis of a special case of the three-body problem, which uses the Lagrange points.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/biolagra.htm   (884 words)

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