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Topic: Latin alphabet


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Latin-Alphabet
The Latin (or, as it is also called, Roman) alphabet appeared in the 7th century BC as an adaptation of the Etruscan alphabet to the Latin language.
The Etruscans themselves borrowed their alphabet from the Greek colonists in Italy; the origin of the Greek alphabet is traced through Phoenician scripts to the North Semitic alphabet, which was already in use in Syria and Palestine during the 12th c.
The change of the Latin writing in the course of the centuries was influenced by the nature of the tool also, primarily the pen, and the material of writing, mainly papyrus and parchment in the Antiquity and the Middle ages and paper from the 14th century onward.
www.orbilat.com /Languages/Latin/Grammar/Latin-Alphabet.html   (1491 words)

  
  Latin alphabet - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
It is generally held that the Latins adopted the western variant of the Greek alphabet in the 7th century BC from Cumae, a Greek colony in southern Italy.
The Latin alphabet spread from Italy, along with the Latin language, to the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea with the expansion of the Roman Empire.
As late as 1492, the Latin alphabet was limited primarily to the languages spoken in western, northern and central Europe.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Latin_alphabet   (2260 words)

  
  Latin alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is generally held that the Latins adopted the western variant of the Greek alphabet in the 7th century BC from Cumae, a Greek colony in southern Italy.
The Latin alphabet spread from Italy, along with the Latin language, to the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea with the expansion of the Roman Empire.
In the late eighteenth century, the Romanians adopted the Latin alphabet; although Romanian is a Romance language, the Romanians were predominantly Orthodox Christians, and until the nineteenth century the Church used the Cyrillic alphabet.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Latin_alphabet   (3816 words)

  
 Latin alphabet - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
In the course of its history, the Latin alphabet was adapted for use for new languages, some of which had phonemes which were not used in languages previously written with this alphabet, and therefore extensions were created as needed.
With the spread of Western Christianity the Latin alphabet spread to the peoples of northern Europe who spoke Germanic languages, displacing their earlier Runic alphabets, as well as to the speakers of Baltic languages, such as Lithuanian and Latvian, and several (non-Indo-European) Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian language.
The Finnish alphabet and collating rules are the same as in Swedish, except for the addition of the letters Š and Ž, which are considered variants of S and Z. In French and English, characters with diaeresis (ä, ë, ï, ö, ü, ÿ) are usually treated just like their un-accented versions.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/l/a/t/Latin_alphabet.html   (3134 words)

  
 Latin definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
Latin Much of English is made up of words from other languages, and a large proportion come from Latin, the extinct language of ancient Rome and its empire, inherited either directly, or indirectly through French (a Romance language developed from Latin).
Latin alternatives to older English words were advocated, for example, terminate (late 16th century) instead of "end" or "finish"; some found a regular useful place in the language, but others, for example sequacious, were always formal and are now often archaic.
Chemical elements are given Latin forms, for example, aluminum (early 19th century) and lutetium (early 20th); anatomical terms often derive from Latin, as in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, and pia mater of the brain.
encarta.msn.com /dictionary_1861625154/Latin.html   (645 words)

  
 Phoenician Alphabet
The Phoenician alphabetic script of 22 letters was used at Byblos as early as the 15th century B.C. This method of writing, later adopted by the Greeks, is the ancestor of the modern Roman alphabet.
All the European alphabets are descendants of the Phoenician, and all the Asiatic alphabets are descendants of the Aramaic variants of the Phoenician.
Phoenician alphabet is the ancestor of the Greek alphabet and, hence, of all Western alphabets.
phoenicia.org /alphabet.html   (3190 words)

  
 Latin alphabet at AllExperts
In the course of its use, the Latin alphabet was adapted for use in new languages, some having phonemes not found in languages already written with the Roman characters.
With the spread of Western Christianity the Latin alphabet spread to the peoples of northern Europe who spoke Germanic languages, displacing their earlier Runic alphabets, as well as to the speakers of Baltic languages, such as Lithuanian and Latvian, and several (non-Indo-European) Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian.
The alphabet is the same as the Turkish alphabet, with the same sounds written with the same letters, except for three additional letters: q, x and ə for sounds that do not exist in Turkish.
en.allexperts.com /e/l/la/latin_alphabet.htm   (3766 words)

  
 Latin
Latin is a member of the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European language family that includes other Romance languages.
Latin developed in west-central Italy in an area along the River Tiber known as Latium which became the birthplace of the Roman civilization.
However, Ecclesiastical Latin, also known as Church Latin, remains the official language of Vatican City, and is used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/january/Latin.html   (1648 words)

  
 Ask Us A Question   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Latin was influenced by the Celtic dialects and the non-Indo-European Etruscan language of northern Italy, as well as by the Greek of southern Italy.
Latin is a synthetic inflectional language: affixes (often suffixes, which usually encode more than one grammatical category) are attached to fixed stems to express gender, number, and case in adjectives, nouns, and pronouns -- a process called 'declension'.
Latin translations of modern literature such as Paddington Bear, Winnie the Pooh, Tintin, Asterix, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Le Petit Prince, Max und Moritz, and The Cat in the Hat are intended to bolster interest in the language.
www.avoo.com /wiki/Latin   (2628 words)

  
 Latin Alphabet
It was adapted from the earlier Etruscan alphabet that had grown to prominence in the region by approximately the 7th century BC.
Additionally, the letters Y and Z were taken from the Greek alphabet as Latin was heavily influenced by its eastern culturally advanced neighbors.
The W was introduced as a 'double-v' to identify the sound that developed later differentiating it from the v.
www.unrv.com /culture/latin-alphabet.php   (270 words)

  
 Latin at AllExperts
Latin is a member of the family of Italic languages, and its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, is based on the Old Italic alphabet, which is in turn derived from the Greek alphabet.
Latin was influenced by the Celtic dialects and the non-Indo-European Etruscan language of northern Italy, as well as by the Greek of southern Italy.
Latin translations of modern literature such as Paddington Bear, Winnie the Pooh, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Le Petit Prince, Max und Moritz, Walter the Farting Dog, and The Cat in the Hat are intended to bolster interest in the language.
en.allexperts.com /e/l/la/latin.htm   (2099 words)

  
 The Universal Adoption of Latin Letters
To have two alphabets used simultaneously, one for commercial and everyday use and the other for the "superior" literature would certainly be intolerable on a permanent basis.
The introduction of the Latin alphabet would mean a considerable lightening of this whole complicated apparatus, and there it doesn't seem to bring difficulties comparable to those we encounter in China, because the phonological structure conforms much more to those of the Western world.
The universal introduction of Latin letters is full of difficulties and will not be able to be carried out in one step, but overall the difficulties are not impossible to overcome, and the advantages will be very great for the nations which know how to overcome them.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Forum/5037/latin.html   (2491 words)

  
 Monotype: Non Latin Font
Intending only to write their own language, Latin, little did the Romans know that they would one day be credited with inventing the most popular script of all time.
As we know it today, the Latin alphabet consists of 26 letters, 5 of which represent vowels while the remainder are consonants.
However limited the basic Latin alphabet may be, it has been effectively extended through a host of ingenious techniques which include the use of accent and diacritic marks, small appendages, digraphs and even trigraphs.
www.monotypefonts.com /Library/Non-Latin-Library.asp?show=info&lan=latinex   (694 words)

  
 Ancient and modern Latin alphabet
The earliest known inscriptions in the Latin alphabet date from the 6th century BC.
It was adapted from the Etruscan alphabet during the 7th century BC.
The letters Y and Z were taken from the Greek alphabet to write Greek loan words.
www.omniglot.com /writing/latin.htm   (447 words)

  
 [No title]
Fortunately the Latin alphabet as used to write Turkish is very similar to the Azeri one, so Turkish typewriters were in great demand.
The main difficulty with the new alphabet is the letter which looks like a upside-down lower case 'e' and is known as a schwa as no other language uses this letter.
Although the origins of the Ogham alphabet are disputed, it is clear that the graphically innovative system has its roots in already existing alphabets, probably the runes and/or the Etruscan and Latin alphabet.
www.lycos.com /info/latin-alphabet--letters.html   (501 words)

  
 The Latin Alphabet
The Latin alphabet of 23 letters was derived in the 600's BC from the Etruscan alphabet of 26 letters, which was in turn derived from the archaic Greek alphabet, which came from the Phoenician.
The letters J, U, and W of the modern alphabet were added in medieval times, and did not appear in the classical alphabet, except that J and U could be alternative forms for I and V. A comparison of the Greek and Latin alphabets shows the close relation between the two.
Alphabets, of course, represent the elementary sounds of speech, which are combined to form syllables, and the syllables into words, expressing speech in terms of a small number of symbols.
www.du.edu /~etuttle/classics/latalph.htm   (659 words)

  
 Alphabet Transitions: Chronology of the New Latin Script
Alphabet changes are not new to Azerbaijan; this was the fourth time this century it had been changed.
Latin replaced Arabic in 1928, followed by Stalin's imposition of Cyrillic in 1938, which remained until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.
In 1928, a committee known as "Yeni Alif" (New Alphabet) was established in Moscow to deal with alphabet issues, and that same year, Latin was adopted for all the Turkic people of the USSR (Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrghyzstan and Uzbekistan).
www.azer.com /aiweb/categories/magazine/52_folder/52_articles/52_alphabet.html   (2009 words)

  
 Latin - FrathWiki
Latin was once taught in many of the schools in Britain with academic leanings—perhaps 25% of the total.
Living Latin movement, whose supporters believe that Latin can, or should, be taught in the same way that modern "living" languages are taught, that is, as a means of both spoken and written communication.
Latin Vulgate The Latin and English of the Old and New Testaments in parallel, along with the Complete Sayings of Jesus in parallel Latin and English.
wiki.frath.net /Latin   (1761 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The alphabet used for the Latin language had no J, U, or W. Table of contents
F (digamma) stood for /w/ in both Etruscan and Latin, but the Romans simplified the FH-/f/combination to F /f/.
In Czech, accented vowels are treated as their unaccented forms, but accented consonants (the ones with hacek) immediatelly follow their unaccented counterparts.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/l/la/latin_alphabet.html   (1295 words)

  
 Learn Latin, Latin Windows, Latin Office, Latin Software, Latin Dictionary, Latin Translation, Latin Keyboards, Latin ...
Latin, the language of ancient Rome, is the ancestor of the modern Romance languages.
Latin was brought to the Italian peninsula by a wave of immigrants from the north about 1000 B.C. Over the centuries the city of Rome rose to a position of prominence and the Latin of Rome became the literary standard of the newly-emerging Roman Empire.
Latin lacks somewhat the variety and flexibility of Greek, perhaps reflecting the practical nature of the Roman people, who were more concerned with government and empire than with speculative thought and poetic imagery.
www.worldlanguage.com /Languages/Latin.htm   (544 words)

  
 Latin Online: Series Introduction
Latin is probably the easiest of the older languages for speakers of English to learn, both because of their earlier relationship and because of the long use of Latin as the language of educational, ecclesiastical, legal and political affairs in western culture.
It might be noted, however, that when Latin was spoken in everyday use, it was pronounced in accordance with the pronunciation of the native language in the country, so that the pronunciation in Italy differed considerably from that in France or Germany, not to speak of England.
Latin i and e are pronounced as in English cliché; Latin a is pronounced as in father; Latin o is pronounced as in so, and u as in sue.
www.utexas.edu /cola/centers/lrc/eieol/latol-0-X.html   (2203 words)

  
 Quel_Alphabet_pour_Tamazighte_latin_arabe_tifinagh_braille
En effet les moyens disproportionnés, qui sous-tendent les langues utilisant l'alphabet latin par rapport à ceux du berbère, peuvent constituer un frein.
Aucun autre alphabet ne peut satisfaire les exigences orthographiques de cette langue, assurer sa diffusion par les moyens modernes de communication et garantir son évolution loin de toutes les contraintes politiques et idéologiques.
L'adoption de cet alphabet est synonyme d'ouverture d'un chantier d'alphabétisation qui prendra des années sinon des décennies.
www.berberescope.com /QuelAlphabetBerbere.htm   (3483 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Latin
Consequently, Western European nations all wrote using the Latin alphabet, and with European imperialism in the last 500 years, the Latin alphabet (with local modifications) is probably the most ubiquitous writing system in the world.
As Latium (the region where Latin is spoken and Rome is located) and Etruria (the region where Etruscan is spoken) are adjacent to each other, the very first examples of the Latin alphabet resemble the Etruscan alphabet.
With these two additions, the Latin alphabet at the late antiquity was nearly identical to most Western European alphabets.
www.ancientscripts.com /latin.html   (650 words)

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