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Topic: Lavender


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In the News (Mon 19 Aug 19)

  
  LAVENDER
The reported life zone of lavender is 7 to 211Cdeg;C with an annual precipitation of 0.3 to 1.3 meters and a soil pH of 5.8 to 8.3 (4.1-31).
The leaves and flowers of lavender are used in regions where the plant is grown as a flavoring in salads, dressings, fruit desserts, jellies, and wines (14.1-23).
English lavender is generally recognized as safe for human consumption as a natural flavoring, and spike lavender and lavandin are generally recognized as safe for use as natural plant extracts/ essential oils (21 CFR sections 182.10, 182.20 [1982]).
www.hort.purdue.edu /newcrop/med-aro/factsheets/LAVENDER.html   (605 words)

  
  Lavender - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lavender was commonly used in Roman baths to scent the water, and it was thought to restore the skin.
Lavender is frequently used as an aid to sleep: Seeds and flowers of the plant are added to pillows, and an infusion of three flowerheads added to a cup of boiling water are recommended as a soothing and relaxing bedtime drink.
Lavender oil (or extract of Lavender) is claimed to heal acne when used diluted 1:10 with water, rosewater, or witch hazel; it is also used in the treatment of skin burns and inflammatory conditions (it is a traditional treatment for these in Iran).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lavender   (558 words)

  
 Lavender
Lavender oil is considered a balancer to the emotions, lifting the spirits, relieving depression and balancing inner disharmony.
Lavender's relaxing effect can be felt in the digestive tract, where it soothes spasm and colic related to tension and anxiety and relieves distension, flatulence, nausea, indigestion, and enhances the appetite.
Lavender stimulates tissue repair and minimizes scar formation when the oil is applied neat to burns and diluted in cases of eczema, acne and varicose ulcers.
www.herbs2000.com /herbs/herbs_lavender.htm   (1909 words)

  
 Lavender Wildflowers - by Provence Beyond
Lavender is native to the Southern Alps, and different varieties grow wild throughout the Beyond region.
The true lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) that thrives in the chalky soils and hot, dry climate of higher altitudes of the Provence was picked systematically at the end of the 19th century.
Some of the larger cultivated lavender fields are found in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence (04), including on the slopes of the Lure mountains, near St. Etienne-les-Orgues (map p14), and on the Sault plateau in the eastern Vaucluse (84)(map p13).
www.beyond.fr /flora/lavender.html   (618 words)

  
 botanical.com - A Modern Herbal | Lavenders - Herb Profile and Information
Lavender was familiar to Shakespeare, but was probably not a common plant in his time, for though it is mentioned by Spencer as 'The Lavender still gray' and by Gerard as growing in his garden, it is not mentioned by Bacon in his list of sweet-smelling plants.
Lavender is of 'especiall good use for all griefes and paines of the head and brain,' it is now almost solely grown for the extraction of its essential oil, which is largely employed in perfumery.
Lavender was one of the old street cries, and white lavender is said to have grown in the garden of Queen Henrietta Maria.
www.botanical.com /botanical/mgmh/l/lavend13.html   (5113 words)

  
 Lavender
Lavender is native to the mountainous zones of the Mediterranean where it grows in sunny, stony habitats.
Lavender is a heavily branched short shrub that grows to a height of roughly 60 centimeters.
One study evaluating essential oils, including lavender, for treating children with eczema concluded that the oils added no benefit to therapeutic touch from the mother; in other words massage with and without essential oils was equally effective in improving the dry, scaly skin lesion.
www.umm.edu /altmed/ConsHerbs/Lavenderch.html   (1285 words)

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