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Topic: Lee De Forest


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In the News (Mon 22 Dec 14)

  
  Lee De Forest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
De Forest is one of the fathers of the "electronic age", as the Audion helped to usher in the widespread use of electronics.
De Forest's innovation was the insertion of a third electrode, the grid, in between the cathode (filament) and the anode (plate) of the previously invented diode.
De Forest filed a patent in 1916 that became the cause of a contentious lawsuit with the prolific inventor Edwin Armstrong, whose patent for the regenerative circuit had been issued in 1914.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lee_De_Forest   (1419 words)

  
 Adventures in CyberSound: De Forest, Lee
Lee De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, on Aug. 26, 1873.
De Forest was the son of a Congregational minister.
De Forest's doctoral dissertation on the "Reflection of Hertzian Waves from the Ends of Parallel Wires" was possibly the first doctoral thesis in the United States on the subject that was later to become known as radio.
www.acmi.net.au /AIC/DE_FOREST_BIO.html   (2159 words)

  
 A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest's father was a minister and hoped that his son would follow in his footsteps.
De Forest was extremely creative and energetic, but often was uable to see the potential of his inventions or grasp their theoretical implications.
De Forest thought the gas was a necessary part of the system.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/aso/databank/entries/btfore.html   (588 words)

  
 Lee De Forest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest is one of the fathers of the "electronic age," as the audion helped to usher in the widespread use of electronic electronic quick summary:
De Forest was interested in wireless telegraphy which led to his invention of the Audion tube[For more info, click on this link], EHandler: no quick summary.
De Forest filed a patent in 1916 that became the cause of a contentious lawsuit with the prolific inventor Edwin Armstrong[Click link for more facts about this topic], EHandler: no quick summary.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/l/le/lee_de_forest.htm   (2767 words)

  
 Lee de Forest...SciPeeps.com
De Forest had several friends from among the fl children of the town.
The Court ruled in favor of De Forest, although the view of most historians is that the judgement was incorrect.
For the initially rejected (but later adopted) movie sound method, de Forest was given an Academy Award (Oscar) in 1959/1960 for "his pioneering inventions which brought sound to the motion picture" and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
www.scipeeps.com /leedeforest.html   (952 words)

  
 Stephen Greene's essay on Lee deForest
De Forest’s pre-turn-of-the century childhood as the son of a white college president at an all-fl Alabama college rooted him in what he admitted was an out-of-the-mainstream tradition (de Forest, 1950).
De Forest’s decision to slam radio in 1930 was also undoubtedly influenced by his long history of bad faith deals, bitter patent fights and drawn-out lawsuits with the very same corporations that were commercializing radio.
De Forest’s letter was lost in the coverage of the convention itself, highlighted by CBS Chairman William Paley’s stern warning against the “high percentage of advertising material which is irritating, offensive and in bad taste” (“Commercial conscience,” 1946, p.
geocities.com /lyon95065/Radio.html   (6410 words)

  
 Lee de Forest - MSN Encarta
Lee De Forest (1873-1961), American inventor who was a pioneer in the development of radio communication.
De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and educated at Yale University.
In 1910 De Forest presented the first live opera radio broadcast, and six years later he announced the results of the presidential election in the first radio news broadcast.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761561957/Lee_de_Forest.html   (202 words)

  
 De Forest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest was extremely creative and energetic, but often was unable to see the potential of his inventions or grasp their theoretical implications.
Lee de Forest was a fan of the opera, and he claimed in his writings that he before anyone else believed that the radiotelephone would be an excellent way to send musical entertainment into homes.
Lee De Forest, known as the father of radio as a result of his invention of the Audion tube in 1906, poses in a 1922 photo with a strip of his Phonofilm sound-on-film.
chem.ch.huji.ac.il /~eugeniik/history/deforest.htm   (3737 words)

  
 Lee De Forest - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Lee De Forest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest saw that if a third electrode were added, the triode valve would serve as an amplifier as well as a rectifier, and radio communications would become a practical possibility.
De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and studied at Yale.
In 1912, De Forest arranged triode valves to transmit both speech and music by radio, and in 1916 he set up a radio station and began broadcasting news.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Lee+De+Forest   (270 words)

  
 Inventor of the Week: Archive
Lee De Forest invented the device that made wireless radio broadcasting practicable: the "triode" or "audion" amplifier.
De Forest's patented "triode" or "audion" tube could both rectify and amplify; and its greater control it meant that various electronic circuits would finally be commercially feasible.
De Forest, who had first predicted the possibility of radio broadcasting in 1902, now founded a company (1907), in order to make commercial radio a reality.
web.mit.edu /invent/iow/deforest.html   (335 words)

  
 IEEE History Center - Legacies: Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest was born in Council Bluffs, IA, on 26 August 1873, the son of a Congregational minister.
In 1906, de Forest filed a patent application on a wireless detector which he called an Audion and which, in its initial form, was a two-electrode device.
De Forest served as president of the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers and became a charter member of the IRE when it was formed in May 1912.
www.ieee.org /organizations/history_center/legacies/deforest.html   (646 words)

  
 Lee De Forest
De Forest was born in Alabama to a Congregational minister who hoped that his son would continue in his footsteps.
De Forest has been labeled one of the fathers of the "electronic age," since the audion helped start the explosion of electronics earlier this century.
De Forest invented the device in 1906, by inserting a grid into the center of a vacuum tube.
www.pbs.org /transistor/album1/addlbios/deforest.html   (396 words)

  
 Antique Radio Classified: The De Forest Reflex Radiophones   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest released this modified model as the D-17.
Because of a temporary injunction obtained by RCA preventing de Forest from selling to jobbers and retailers, de Forest was forced to consign his radios to the selling agents.
De Forest put his company into receivership in 1926, and the company produced no more radios after 1930.
www.antiqueradio.com /gonshor_deforest_8-97.html   (995 words)

  
 The Audion Piano
The immediate application of De Forest's triode valve was in the emerging radio technology of which De Forest was a tenacious promoter, De Forest also discovered that the valve was also capable of creating audio frequencies using the heterodyning/beat frequency technique: combining two high frequency signals to create a composite lower frequency within audible range.
De Forest planned a later version of the instrument that would have separate valves per key allowing full polyphony- it is not known if this instrument was ever constructed.
De Forest also collaborated with a skeptical Thadeus Cahill in broadcasting early concerts of the Telharmonium using his radio transmitters (1907).
www.obsolete.com /120_years/machines/audion_piano   (576 words)

  
 NewsScan Publishing Inc. - NewsScan Daily Archives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, the son of a Congregational minister, but was brought up in Alabama, where his father had become president of the Talladega College for Negroes.
De Forest was acquitted and then made the fateful decision to sell his rights to the Audion -- only to watch his "worthless" invention become the basis for the subsequent success of AT&T. De Forest later designed a movie-sound system and contributed to the development of the phonograph, telephone, television, radar, and diathermy.
Despite an understandable degree of bitterness at the financial exploitation of his inventions, De Forest continued as an active freelance inventor well into old age, and was granted his last patent in 1957 at age 84.
www.newsscan.com /cgi-bin/findit_view?table=honorary_subscriber&id=804   (531 words)

  
 2000 Inductees - Lee de Forest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The simple but revolutionary, innovation that Lee de Forest incorporated in his audion tube was a third electrode inserted between the cathode and the anode, making the tube much more sensitive to electromagnetic radiation.
The promise of the audion enabled de Forest to raise capital to form a company and begin the process of transmitting and receiving voice.
De Forest died in 1961 in the town his "talking motion pictures" invention helped to turn into the film capital of the world, Hollywood, CA.
www.njinvent.njit.edu /2000/inductees_2000/deforest.html   (447 words)

  
 Lee De Forest Papers (Library of Congress)
Correspondence, diaries, technical notes and other material relating to Lee De Forest's inventions in radio and electronics and their effect in sound recording and transmission, efforts to exploit his discoveries through various business ventures, and his competition with Guglielmo Marconi in the field of wireless communication.
De Forest was a pioneer in wireless communications who made possible the long distance transmission and reception of the human voice, which led to the foundation of the radio industry and long distance telephone communication.
De Forest's diaries, or notebook journals, span the years 1891-1949 and contain references to the difficulties encountered in the early years of his career as he struggled for recognition in the face of persistent lack of funds and inconstant friends.
www.loc.gov /rr/mss/text/deforest.html   (571 words)

  
 IEEEVM: Lee De Forest
De Forest eventually arrived at Yale and remained there until he received a doctorate in physics for his work on radio waves.
De Forest was a pioneer broadcaster in addition to an inventor and engineer.
In general, De Forest’s attempts to establish himself as a businessman were not only unsuccessful but also damaging to his career, as bankruptcy and suspicions of fraud invariably attached themselves to his business enterprises.
www.ieee-virtual-museum.org /collection/people.php?id=1234618&lid=1   (636 words)

  
 Super Scientists - Lee De Forest
De Forest invented what he called the "audion tube," or vacuum tube, in 1906 that helped put radio and television broadcasts "on the air." He also developed a way to put sound on film.
De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa in 1873, studied at Yale and became a physicist.
That was four years before KDKA in Pittsburgh went on the air, which is considered to be the first radio station in the U.S. De Forest also had plenty of problems along the way.
www.energyquest.ca.gov /scientists/deforest.html   (204 words)

  
 Dr. Lee De Forest - Radios & Research
In 1907 De Forest patented a bulb with the same contents as the Fleming diode, except for an added electrode.
De Forest discovered that if he applied the signal from the wireless-telegraph antenna to the grid instead of the filament, he could obtain a much more sensitive detector of the signal.
De Forest radiophone receiver manufatured in 1930 in Passaic, NJ.
www.deforestradio.com /radios.shtml   (439 words)

  
 Lee De Forest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Lee DeForest was born on August 26, 1873 in Council Bluffs, Iowa to a congregational minister.
Lastly, in 1916, Lee DeForest pioneered radio news and broadcasting of the presidential election (which he did totally wrong).
Lee DeForest was married three times and failed many businesses throughout his life time, but that did not prevent his inventing wonderful and helpful things.
www.newton.mec.edu /brown/te/INVENTORS/INVENTORS/byKIDS/mescon.html   (171 words)

  
 Radio Hall of Fame - Dr. Lee DeForest, Pioneer
As a student at Yale University, Dr. deForest’s Ph.D. dissertation on high-frequency oscillation effects in parallel wires was one of the first treatises on radio waves and the possibilities of wireless communication.
Unlike the “diode”; tube developed by British engineer John Ambrose Fleming, de Forest’s “triode”; audion tube could amplify signals and generate oscillations, making it possible to transmit sound over wireless communication systems.
Lee deForest was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1989.
www.radiohof.org /pioneer/leedeforest.html   (200 words)

  
 IEEEVM: Lee De Forest
De Forest won the suit, but his peers felt that the real scientific achievement belonged to Armstrong.
During the 1920s De Forest began to work on a system for producing motion pictures with sound.
By the end of his career, De Forest had earned more than three hundred patents but never achieved the status of “Father of Radio” that he sought for himself.
www.ieee-virtual-museum.org /collection/people.php?id=1234618&lid=1   (636 words)

  
 Invent Now | Hall of Fame | Search | Inventor Profile
The audion amplifier was the most important of de Forest's more than 300 patents.
Born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, de Forest at an early age exhibited the inventive talents that were to make him famous.
De Forest's doctorate thesis was on the "Reflection of Hertzian Waves from the Ends of Parallel Wires"; thus began his long career in radio
www.invent.org /hall_of_fame/40.html   (224 words)

  
 Who's Who in the Twentieth Century: De Forest, Lee @ HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Forest, Lee (1873–1961) US electrical engineer who invented the triode valve.
The son of a Congregational minister, De Forest, against his father's wishes, studied science at Yale, obtaining his PhD in 1899.
In 1902 he set up the first of his several companies, the De Forest Wireless Telegraph Co., which failed (as the others did) after a few years.
www.highbeam.com /doc/1O47:DeForestLee/De+Forest,+Lee+.html?refid=ip_hf   (193 words)

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