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Topic: Leonard Hayflick


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  The People of KLRI (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.tamu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Hayflick was best know for his research in cell biology and mycoplasmology where he discovered that, contrary to what was believed since the turn of the century, cultured normal human and animal cells have a limited capacity for replication.
Hayflick is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an Honorary Member of the Tissue Culture Association and is one of the most cited contemporary scientists in the world in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, enzymology, genetics and molecular biology.
Hayflick is the author of over 225 scientific papers, book chapters and edited books of which four papers are among the 100 most cited scientific papers of the two million papers published in the basic biomedical sciences from 1961 to 1978.
www.kronosinstitute.org.cob-web.org:8888 /Biographies/biography-Hayflick.html   (853 words)

  
 MPI for Human Development: News
Hayflick is best known for his research in cell biology and mycoplasmology where he discovered that, contrary to what was believed since the turn of the century, cultured normal human and animal cells have a limited capacity for replication.
Hayflick is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an Honorary Member of the Tissue Culture Association and, according to the Institute of Scientific Information, is one of the most cited contemporary scientists in the world in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, enzymology, genetics and molecular biology.
Dr. Hayflick is the author of over 250 scientific papers, book chapters and edited books of which four papers are among the 100 most cited scientific papers of the two million papers published in the basic biomedical sciences from 1961 to 1978.
www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de /en/aktuelles/hayflick.htm   (916 words)

  
 Hayflick Limit Encyclopedia Article @ Middle-aged.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The only known way of circumventing the Hayflick limit is with the enzyme, which regenerates telomeres during DNA replication.
This would mean they already aren't limited by the Hayflick limit and can easily metastasize into the pool of cells in their final cell type destination.
Hayflick L. The limited in vitro lifetime of human diploid cell strains.
www.middle-aged.org /encyclopedia/Hayflick_limit   (591 words)

  
 How and Why We Age
Hayflick (anatomy, Univ. of California Medical Sch.), a nationally recognized gerontologist with over 30 years' experience in the study of the aging process, presents a cogent response to the question of how and why we age.
Hayflick is as interested in exploding myths as he is in pointing out what is scientifically known and what still needs to be done.
Hayflick lays out most of what is known about what happens as people age and outlines many of the theories and studies that try to explain the process.
www.cron-web.org /Books/title/How-and-Why-We-Age.html   (734 words)

  
 Leonard Hayflick Biography | World of Genetics
In 1961, Leonard Hayflick and his colleague cytogeneticist Paul Moorhead conducted a series of definitive experiments in which they were able to demonstrate that normal human somatic cells have a finite number of replicative cycles.
Hayflick interpreted his findings to mean that the limited replicative (in vitro) capacity of cultured normal cells was a manifestation of their aging and longevity.
Hayflick is also a member of several advisory boards and acts as an industry and government consultant.
www.bookrags.com /biography/leonard-hayflick-wog   (694 words)

  
 Leonard Hayflick Bio
Dr. Hayflick is best known for his research in cell biology and mycoplasmology where he discovered that, contrary to what was believed since the turn of the century, cultured normal human and animal cells have a limited capacity for replication.
Dr. Hayflick developed the first normal human diploid cell strain for studies on human aging and for research use throughout the world wherever a normal human cell is required.
Hayflick is the author of over 250 scientific papers, book chapters and edited books of which four papers are among the 100 most cited scientific papers of the two million papers published in the basic biomedical sciences from 1961 to 1978.
www.agelessanimals.org /hayflickbio.htm   (904 words)

  
 How and Why We Age by Leonard Hayflick
Hayflick, Professor of Anatomy at UCSF and former professor of Microbiology at Stanford, was the keynote speaker at this year’s conference of the American Medical Writer’s Association.
Hayflick writes for the lay reader and believes that the study of aging, until recently considered an uninteresting scientific backwater, is one of the last major biological frontiers.
Hayflick cautions that as Social Security, entitlements, and education came under the cutting knife or at least the freezing knife, it may be entirely reasonable, certainly not heretical, that research should come under the same blade.
www.delmeyer.net /bkrev896.htm   (802 words)

  
 Cross-browser Dynamic HTML Scripts - ScrollText
Hayflick is best known for his research in cell biology and mycoplasmology, having discovered in 1962 that, contrary to accepted belief, cultured normal human and animal cells have a limited capacity for replication.
Hayflick demonstrated for the first time that mortal and immortal mammalian cells existed, and this distinction is the basis for much modern cancer research.
Hayflick developed WI-38, the first normal human diploid cell strain for studies on human aging and for research use throughout the world wherever a normal human cell is required; it is now used for the manufacture of most of the world’s human virus vaccines.
www.extended-eternallife.org /presenters/leonardHayflick.htm   (458 words)

  
 SCI.CRYONICS: "How and Why We Age" by Leonard Hayflick
The fact that Hayflick argues that cryonics won't work, and that his arguments display complete ignorance of even the basics of cryonics, and that he thinks extending human life span is a bad idea; will not come as a surprise to anyone familiar with this area.
Second, Hayflick states that cells don't "survive." Unfortunately, he is obviously referring to functional survival by current criteria, an objective whose relevance to cryonics is at best marginal (confer "information theoretic survival," discussed in several places in the cryonics literature).
Hayflick spends considerable time trying to persuade us that slowing or halting aging would be bad (an interesting stance for someone who has devoted his life to the study of aging...) Hayflick is obviously worried that these efforts will succeed.
www.cryonet.org /cgi-bin/dsp.cgi?msg=3199   (1122 words)

  
 Hayflick Limit Encyclopedia Article @ Genetically.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Hayflick limit was discovered by Main Page in Leonard Hayflick.
The only known way of circumventing the Hayflick limit is with the enzyme edit, which regenerates telomeres during DNA replication.
Disclaimers, by definition, have not yet been fully differentiated, and therefore many of these cells may continue to regenerate new cells for the entire lifespan of the organism, without limit, thus constituting a notable exception to the Hayflick limit in humans and other organisms.
www.genetically.org /encyclopedia/Hayflick_limit   (585 words)

  
 Pushing The Limit: An Interview with Dr. Leonard Hayflick   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Leonard Hayflick, Ph.D., is a microbiologist whose research revolutionized cell biology, and helped to provide a scientific foundation for the field of cellular gerontology (or cytogerontology)—the study of aging at the cellular level.
Hayflick demonstrated that this illness is caused by a member of the smallest free-living class of microorganisms—which he named Mycoplasma pneumoniae—and not by a virus, as was previously believed.
Hayflick was the Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Gerontology for thirteen years, president of the Gerontological Society of America, chairman of the Scientific Review Board of the American Federation for Aging Research, and a founding member and chairman of the executive committee of the Council of the National Institute on Aging.
www.smart-publications.com /articles/MOM-hayflick.php   (3152 words)

  
 Leonard Hayflick Encyclopedia Article @ AgeFreeze.com (Age Freeze)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
As Leonard Hayflick has said, cures for all of the "diseases of aging" will not make us live forever or even significantly extend our healthy years, but would...
Leonard Hayflick (born in 1928), PMID 9666198, is Professor of [4] at the Microbiology, cells, School of, and was Professor of Medical edit at San Francisco School of Medicine.
In 1961 Hayflick and his colleague Moorehead at the [2] in life extension derived the Wi-38 human Overviews human cell line, which revolutionized Portals manufacture.
www.agefreeze.com /encyclopedia/Leonard_Hayflick   (403 words)

  
 Leonard Hayflick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He is a past president of the Gerontological Society of America and was a founding member of the council of the National Institute on Aging (NIA).
In 1961 Hayflick and his colleague Moorehead at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia derived the Wi-38 human diploid human cell line, which revolutionized vaccine manufacture.
Hayflick has written numerous articles criticizing both the feasiblilty and desirability of human life extension
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Leonard_Hayflick   (252 words)

  
 leadership.htm   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The "Hayflick Limit," the definition of a limit of cellular division as presented by Dr. Leonard Hayflick, is widely accepted as an immutable rule.
Hayflick discovered that when tissue cells are taken from a human body and cultured in a laboratory dish, they will grow and divide roughly 50 times before they then die.
According to Dr. Chachoua, the Hayflick division can be increased based on principles of Induced Remission Therapy® and has had the capacity to do so for at least a decade prior to the telomere announcement.
biotech.epolk.com /hayflick.htm   (674 words)

  
 21st Century Earth Research: Human Longevity Will Not Become Greatly Extended | Opposing Viewpoints Research Topic
Hayflick asserts that the scientific objective should not be to slow or stop the aging process, but to strive for maximum human life expectation by eliminating the present leading causes of death, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.
Hayflick is a professor of anatomy at the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine.
Leonard Hayflick overturned the entrenched dogma in cell biology that normal cells can grow indefinitely outside the organism when supplied with necessary nutrients.
www.bookrags.com /researchtopics/21st-century-earth/sub35.html   (615 words)

  
 Prof. Leonard Hayflilck's Book Chapter as of February 25, 2004
Crimmins EM, Hayward MD, and Saito Y (1994) Changing mortality and morbidity rates and the health status and life expectancy of the older population.
Hayflick L (2000) The Illusion of Cell Immortality.
Olshansky SJ, Hayflick L, and Carnes BA (June 2002) No Truth to the Fountain of Youth.
www.grg.org /resources/LHayflickChapt.htm   (7579 words)

  
 History & Scientific Background of Stem Cells
Hayflick's discovery not only shattered conventional "wisdom", but it also focused attention on the cell as the fundamental location of aging.
Dr. Hayflick was able to demonstrate for the first time that both mortal and immortal mammalian cells exist.
Despite the "Hayflick limit", it has also been shown that cells may be immortalized, "crashing right through the Hayflick limit and continuing for dozens more cell doublings", by the extension of telomeres with telomerase.
www.cellmedicine.com /history.asp   (591 words)

  
 Salon Health & Body | On immortality
Hayflick's view of significantly increased longevity is, basically, that it won't happen, it can't happen, and if it did happen it would be a bad thing.
Hayflick, a professor of anatomy at the University of California at San Francisco's school of medicine, is the author of "How and Why We Age," and has been thinking about longevity for 30 years, ever since he discovered what's now called the Hayflick Limit.
Hayflick doesn't believe that we will be able to go beyond resolving disease to slowing or stopping the process of aging.
archive.salon.com /health/feature/2000/03/30/immortal/index1.html   (1196 words)

  
 Amazon.com: How and Why We Age: Books: Leonard Phd Hayflick   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
In a lucid, even-handed style, Hayflick discusses the scientific discoveries that have been made about the aging process, and presents the evidence behind a variety of different theories of aging.
Hayflick himself is famous for having contributed to discovering that the progressive shortening of the ends of our chromosomes (the telomeres) is associated with cellular aging.
Hayflick even goes back to basics and discusses whether or not we actually are living longer than our ancestors, or whether we just seem to be because of a decline in infant mortality.
www.amazon.com /How-Why-Age-Leonard-Hayflick/dp/0345401557   (1852 words)

  
 Scientists Debate Humain Life Expectancy
"Superlongevity is simply not possible," stated Leonard Hayflick, a distinguished scientist from the University of California, San Francisco, whose discovery of the Hayflick Limit in cell division four decades ago is regarded as one of the most important breakthroughs of the 20th century in the understanding of aging at the cellular level.
"Professor Hayflick and I disagree" that the upper reaches of longevity are capped, said Kaare Christensen, a professor at the University of Southern Denmark.
Hayflick and Christensen participated in a symposium titled "How Long Can Humans Live?" at the February annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, held in San Francisco.
www.asaging.org /at/at-218/Scientists.html   (964 words)

  
 Re: Can the life span of an individual be determined by counting the Telomeres?
The Hayflick limit is cell type specific, which is to say that different types of cells (firbroblast vs. liver cell for example) have different Hayflick limits.
Another observation that Hayflick made was that if he took fibroblasts derived from human embryos and fibroblasts from human adults, the cells from the embryos divided many more times than those from the adult.
Both the observations by Hayflick and the observations of telomere shortening resulted in the proposition that telomere length and telomerase activity could be important determinants in an organisms aging - as per your question.
www.madsci.org /posts/archives/feb2001/983562141.Ge.r.html   (666 words)

  
 AFAR: What is Cellular Senescence   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Forty years ago, Dr. Leonard Hayflick and his colleague, Dr. Paul Moorhead, discovered that many human cells—particularly fibroblast cells, which secrete substances that provide structure to tissues—had a limited capacity to reproduce themselves in culture by dividing.
Hayflick also pointed out in a second report that there are two classes of cells: normal mortal cells and immortal cancer cells.
Some scientists today believe that what determines the Hayflick Limit for dividing cells is the length of cells' telomeres (see the Telomeres Information Center).
websites.afar.org /site/PageServer?pagename=IA_b_sene_01_what   (448 words)

  
 totse.com | The Hayflick Limit (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.tamu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
In the early 60's, Dr. Leonard Hayflick carried out research at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia which led to the discovery of the "Hayflick Limit".
Hayflick found that lung tissue appeared to die out after the cells had divided a certain number of times (roughly 50).
The discovery of the Hayflick Limit led to theories speculating on the existence of a cellular "clock".
www.totse.com.cob-web.org:8888 /en/fringe/life_extension/age5.html   (357 words)

  
 telomeres   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
When research into aging was in its infancy, Dr. Leonard Hayflick observed that human cells grown in tissue culture would only divide a certain number of times, a phenomonon nicknamed "the Hayflick limit".
Hayflick's research was the first clear indication that there was a "biological clock" in our cells which determines the maximum life span, a clock which is broken in cancer cells.
Around 1986, the genetic basis of the Hayflick limit was confirmed in part by Dr.Howard Cooke in Edinburgh, who found that telomeres were shorter in differentiated cells like skin and muscle than germ cells.
www.beloit.edu /~nutritio/Nfiles/N305telomere.htm   (840 words)

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