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Topic: Lepontic


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  Irish Language
The Celtic language family is made up of the extinct Continental Celtic languages (consisting of Celtiberian, Gaulish, Lepontic, and Galatian), and the Insular Celtic languages of the so-called British Isles.
This insular group is further divided into the Brythonic languages, consisting of Cumbrian, Welsh, Cornish, and Breton of which only Welsh and Breton have survived into modern times, and the Goidelic family of Scots Gaelic, Manx Gaelic, and Irish Gaelic, known in Ireland simply as Irish.
Celts in western continental Europe spoke Gaulish; Celts in what is now called Spain spoke Celtiberian; Celts in the Balkans spoke Galatian; Celts in the region of modern Switzerland spoke Lepontic.
www.celtictraveler.com /Irish_language-4.html   (643 words)

  
  Lepontic language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The language was spoken in the lake region of northern Italy between 700 and 400 BC, however, it is probable it was used also before and after this date but we have no proof of that.
Scientists agree to the statement that Lepontic Celts came here during one of the first waves of Celtic expansion over Europe, and lived here until they were eventually assimilated by Latin (or by the later arrived Sennon Gauls, representing the next Celtic wave).
We can only state that Lepontic was a P-Celtic tongue, but of a specific group different from both Brittonnic ang Goidelic.
members.tripod.com /~babaev/tree/lepontic.html   (0 words)

  
  Lepontic
Lepontic is an extinct Celtic language that was once spoken in Northern Italy between 700 BCE and 400 BCE.
Lepontic was eventually assimilated by Latin, after the Roman Empire gained control over Northern Italy.
The Prae-Italic Dialects of Italy Vol 1 & 2 (of 3) Vol 1 The Venetic Inscriptions Vol 2 The Raetic, Lepontic, Gallic, EAst-Italic Messapic and Sicel Inscriptions
www.abacci.com /wikipedia/topic.aspx?cur_title=Lepontic   (139 words)

  
 Lepontic language - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Lepontic is an extinct Celtic language, the language of the Lepontii, that was spoken in parts of Cisalpine Gaul between 700 BC and 400 BC.
Lepontic was assimilated first by Gaulish, with the settlement of Gaulish tribes north of the River Po, and then by Latin, after the Roman Republic gained control over Gallia Cisalpina during the late second and first century BC.
The older Lepontic inscriptions date back to before the 5th century BC, the item from Castelletto Ticino being dated at the 6th century BC and that from Sesto Calende possibly being from the 7th century BC (Prosdocimi, 1991).
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Lepontic   (624 words)

  
 Lepontic language - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Lepontic is an extinct Celtic language, the language of the Lepontii, that was spoken in the area of Gallia Cisalpina between 700 BC and 400 BC.
The classification of this dialect as Gaulish and even Celtic has been disputed, and a relation to the Ligurian language was proposed.
Lepontic was eventually assimilated by Latin, after the Roman Empire gained control over Gallia Cisalpina.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Lepontic   (170 words)

  
 Lepontic - Definition, explanation
The language is only known from a few inscriptions discovered that were written in a variety of the Northern Italic alphabet, which was related to the Old Italic alphabet.
The closely related Rhaetic and Venetic dialects had similar scripts, and many scholars believe that they and the Lepontic writing systems are the direct models adopted for the Germanic runic alphabets.
Others, however, question the classification of this dialect as Gaulish and even Celtic, but consider it, together with a number of other dialects of ancient Northern Italy and Southern Gaul, as related to the Ligurian language.
lexikon.calsky.com /en/txt/l/le/lepontic.php   (186 words)

  
 Lepontic language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This language was spoken in the lake region of northern Italy between 700 and 400 B.C.; however, it most probably was used before and after this date as well, though we have no existing proof of that.
Scientists agree to the statement that Lepontic Celts came here during one of the first waves of Celtic expansion over Europe and lived in the region until they were eventually assimilated by the expanded Latin (Roman) state (or by the later-arrived Senone Gauls, who represented the next major Celtic wave).
Soon nothing is to be heard (or found) concerning the Lepontic language, and finally Romans assimilated all language groups who had to this point lived here.
indoeuro.bizland.com /tree/celt/lepontic.html   (239 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gaulish is paraphyletically grouped with Celtiberian, Lepontic, and Galatian as Continental Celtic.
The earliest Continental Celtic inscriptions, dating to as early as the 6th century BC, are in Lepontic (sometimes considered a dialect of Gaulish), found in Gallia Cisalpina and were written in a form of the Old Italic alphabet.
Inscriptions in the Greek alphabet from the 3rd century BC have been found in the area near the mouths of the Rhône, while later inscriptions dating to Roman Gaul are mostly in the Latin alphabet.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Gaulish_language   (1678 words)

  
 Glozel, Bones of Contention - The Writing
The Roman historian Livy writes that a part of the Gallic tribe of the Bituriges Cubi, located to the northwest of Glozel, in what is today Berry, migrated around 400 BC accompanied by neighboring groups toward the plain of the Po in the direction of Mediolanum, today Milan.
It was the Celts of the Golasecca culture in northern Italy, in Piedmont and Lombardy, who had first adapted a northern Etruscan alphabet to record a Celtic language during the Hallstatt period, in the seventh century BC.
The use of similar or practically identical Lepontic proper names in both Glozel and Cisalpine Gaul must be the result of a long tradition.
www.glozel.net /writing.html   (0 words)

  
 Lepontic articles and news from Start Learning Now
Celtic language, the language of the Lepontii, that was spoken in parts of Cisalpine Gaul between 700 BC and 400 BC.
The grouping of all of these inscriptions into a single Celtic language has been disputed, and some (including specifically all of the older ones) are said to be in a non-Celtic language related to Ligurian language
While the language is named after the tribe of the ''Lepontii'', which occupied portions of ancient Rhaetia, specifically an Alps
www.startlearningnow.com /Lepontic.htm   (531 words)

  
 ancient Lepontic runes (Re: Whence the name "Europa"?
Greetings, all If someone wants to see some pretty cool ancient Lepontic runes from Italy, here's the place, http://members.tripod.com/adolfozavaroni/lepontic.htm And there are also all sorts of other ancient Italian runes there, if you navigate this webpage a bit.
It bore the name = = Korisios, (probably the name of the man who forged the blade)." = = = = The question is whether or not what they wrote comes under the heading = = of 'documentation'.
= = Quite apart from the content, this paragraph's validity is = somewhat vitiated by its illiteracy: the alphabet is Lepontic, not = Leptonic; the Etruscans whose, not who's; and a couple other less = glaring problems.
www.science-one.com /new-1868784-4250.html   (355 words)

  
 LISTSERV 14.4
Irish and Celtiberian are more conservative branches of Celtic, retaining the PIE -kw- whereas Lepontic, Gaulish and Brittonic transform it into a -p-.
It is interesting to note that the characteristically Celtic loss of PIE -P- seems to be reaching its completion by the earliest Lepontic inscriptions - which have a letter -v- where we might expect a PIE -P- (ex: UVAMO- possibly from PIE *UP-eM-O).
The value of the -v- is unsure - perhaps it is a consonantal -w- or an -f- sound.
listserv.linguistlist.org /cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0001&L=indo-european&D=1&F=&S=&P=33301   (310 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Old Italic alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: )
U came to be used to represent Oscan o, while Ú was used for actual Oscan u.
The "Alphabet of Lugano" was used to record Lepontic inscriptions, among the oldest testimonies of any Celtic language, in use from the 7th to the 5th centuries BC.
The alphabet has 17 letters, derived from the archaic Etruscan alphabet: Location within Switzerland Lugano is a city in south-east Switzerland, in the Italian speaking canton of Ticino, which borders Italy.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Old-Italic-alphabet   (3097 words)

  
 Lepontic   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Shop and compare great deals on lepontic and millions of other related products at MonsterMarketplace.
Lepontic is an extinct Celtic language, the language of the Lepontii, that was spoken in parts of Gallia Cisalpina (Cisalpine Gaul) between 700 BC and 400 BC.
While the language is named after the tribe of the Lepontii, which occupied portions of Rhaetia (in modern Switzerland and Italy), in the Alps, bordering Cisalpine Gaul, the term is currently used by many Celticists to apply to all Celtic dialects of ancient Italy.
sports.abcworld.net /Lepontic.html   (522 words)

  
 News | Gainesville.com | The Gainesville Sun | Gainesville, Fla.   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gotthard Pass and Simplon Pass, corresponding roughly to present-day Ossola and Ticino.
This map of Rhaetia [1] shows the location of the Lepontic territory, in the south-western corner of Rhaetia.
The area to the South, including what was to become the Insubrian capital Mediolanum (modern Milan), was Etruscan around 600-500 BC, when the Lepontii began writing tombstone inscriptions in their alphabet (one of several Etruscan-derived alphabets in the Rhaetian territory).
www.gainesville.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Lepontii   (191 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The term "Insular" refers to the place of origin of these languages, the British Isles, in contrast to the (now extinct) Continental Celtic languages of mainland Europe and Anatolia.
There is a theory that the Brythonic and Goidelic languages evolved together in those islands, having a common ancestor more recent than any shared with the Continental Celtic languages such as Celtiberian, Gaulish, Galatian and Lepontic, among others, all of which are long extinct.
The proponents of the Insular Celtic hypothesis point to shared innovations among Insular Celtic languages, including inflected prepositions, shared use of certain verbal particles and VSO word order.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Insular_Celtic_languages   (228 words)

  
 Ricerca Italiana - PRIN - Università "Cà Foscari" di VENEZIA
As explained in the overall description, the focus on the writing aspect that characterizes this research project has a particularly promising area available in northern Italy.
For what concerns the Celtic language, in the area covered by this language identified with the so-called Lepontic alphabet, the writing forms correspond constantly with the cultural and ethnic aspects that are expressed by the language.
The ‘ideological' use of writing as an ethnic assertion reflects both in coinage (legends) and in the epigraphy of the Cenomanic area during the Romanization period (see the references to paragraphs 2.4 and 2.4a, below).
www.ricercaitaliana.it /prin/unita_op_en-2005107418_002.htm   (466 words)

  
 History of Runes
The three best known runic alphabets are the elder futhark, the younger futhark, and the Anglo-Saxon futhorc.
The most likely candidate for the origins of runic scripts are 5th to 1st century BC Lepontic, Rhaetic and Venetic alphabets from northern Italy, all closely related to each other and descended from Etruscan.
These scripts bear a remarkable resemblance to the futhark in many regards.
www.alinda.co.uk /gateway/runes/runes.htm   (256 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Lepontic
The Prae-Italic Dialects of Italy Vol 1 & 2 (of 3) Vol 1 The Venetic Inscriptions Vol 2 The Raetic, Lepontic, Gallic, EAst-Italic Messapic and Sicel Inscriptions by Whatmought and johnson conway (Hardcover - 1933)
variations of the Etruscan: the Lepontic in(] Venetic alphabets were used...
Ligurian and Lepontic inscriptions were found in the...
www.amazon.com /s?ie=UTF8&keywords=Lepontic&index=blended&page=1   (667 words)

  
 Kenmare Ireland - The Irish Language -
Celts in western continental Europe spoke Gaulish; Celts in Spain spoke Celtiberian; Celts in the Balkans spoke Galatian; Celts in the region of modern Switzerland spoke Lepontic.
Liberalizing the definition of fluency could allow the numbers of Scots Gaelic and Irish speakers in Scotland to Ireland to as many as 600,000.
In some cases, as with Celtiberian, Galatian, Gaulish, Lepontic, Cumbric, and others, it is too late.
www.kenmare.com /history/irishlan.html   (0 words)

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