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Topic: Leslie Marmon Silko


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko, an accomplished Native American contemporary writer, was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1948.
Silko reveals that living in Laguna society as a mixed blood from a prominent family caused her a lot of pain.
Silko, despite her pain, was able to overcome the lack of acceptance and identify with the Laguna culture Despite her keen awareness of the equivocal position of mixed-bloods in Laguna society, she considers herself Laguna.
www.english.emory.edu /Bahri/Silko.html   (782 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko: Storyteller
The first Laguna Marmons, brothers Walter and Silko's great-grandfather Robert, came from Ohio in the 1880s as surveyors, married Laguna women, and became part of the community, Walter as a school teacher and Robert as a trader; both eventually were elected to serve as Governor of the Pueblo.
Silko's own affinity for this place reflects, perhaps, her own felt "position," occupying as she does a marginal site with respect to both Laguna "within" and the dominant Anglo mainstream "out there" -- and as she depicts it, it's not a bad place to be.
In 1978 Silko was the subject of a documentary film entitled "Running on the Edge of the Rainbow," one of a series of filmings of oral narrative performances produced by Larry Evers at the University of Arizona, in which she played herself as a Laguna storyteller.
oncampus.richmond.edu /~rnelson/silko.cam.html   (3369 words)

  
 Ceremony (Contemporary American Fiction Series) By Leslie Marmon Silko - The Egg Head Bookstore   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Silko's refusal to tell her tale in an expected, pedantic format works to pull the reader deeper into the narrative, to feel that he is a part of the story himself.
Silko somehow manages to make her plot gell with the poetry and mythology employed until at the end all three of these elements come together to create one story and one message.It is also a novel founded deeply in setting.
Leslie Marmon, the author, portrays Tayo as a weak and helpless young man at the beginning of the story, but this vision soon changes due to the authors vivid descriptions and deep thinking, the reader begins to realize that there is much more to Tayo than a weak Indian.
www.theegghead.com /bookreviews/CeremonyContemporaryAmericanFictionSeries.php   (11881 words)

  
 A page on Leslie Marmon Silko
Leslie Marmon Silko is a Native American writer of Laguna Pueblo, Mexican, and white descent.
Silko is the author of the poetry collection Laguna Woman (1974) (poetry), the novel Ceremony (1977), the multi-genre story collection Storyteller (1981), the novel Almanac of the Dead (1992), Sacred Water: Narratives and Pictures (1993), the essay collection Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit (1996), and the novel Gardens in the Dunes (2000).
Silko's visit to Liepzig, Germany, is the occasion for this discussion of the German romance with American Indians, pre-Christian indigenous cultures in Europe, capitalism, the writing of Silko's novel Almanac of the Dead, and other topics.
www.henkimaa.nu /writings/crit/silko   (446 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko & Storyteller
Silko's belief about why they survived, and sometimes thrived, goes to the heart of the philosophy of storytelling which carries throughout Storyteller and, indeed, all her work.
Silko describes storytelling as a communal process in which variant versions of a story were welcome because of the important details they supplied about the land, animals and plants, social and political relations, and everything else people needed to know to survive, and even thrive.
Silko, Leslie Marmon and Wright, James A. With the Delicacy and Strength of Lace: Letters Between Leslie Marmon Silko and James Wright.
www.henkimaa.nu /writings/crit/silko/storyteller.html   (1446 words)

  
 Lannan Foundation - Leslie Marmon Silko   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, of mixed ancestry — Anglo, Mexican, and Native American — and grew up at Laguna Pueblo.
In her novel Garden in the Dunes, Silko takes the reader on a grand tour of Europe in the era of Henry James, as seen through the eyes of a young Native American girl, Indigo, who is in flight from the destruction at the hands of the whites of her own tribal world.
Silko lives in Tucson, Arizona where is currently at work on a novel, Blue Seven, and on a memoir about the rattlesnakes that live under her dining room floor.
www.lannan.org /lf/bios/detail/leslie-marmon-silko1   (240 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko's Web of Essays in
Silko revealed that the Laguna people traditionally buried their dead in rooms that were partially collapsed yet attached to the house.
Silko included in the chapter "Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit" a discussion of the story of the Thought Woman, which is one of the creation stories passed on to her through oral tradition.
Silko exemplified this identifying power of imagination when she revealed that early on she realized she was seen as an outsider because of her mixed ancestry.
www.usd.edu /archive/ejournal/projects/jconrad.html   (1645 words)

  
 Interpretation Brings Us Together: Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony and the Hermeneutic Circle
What Silko provides us with is a book that builds bridges so that, as readers embarking on our own personal "ceremony" of striving to understand, we can each make connections between the novel and our lives, and likewise, Silko connects the Native American tradition of storytelling to a Western tradition.
She quotes Silko discussing this gathering in her essay, "As with the web, the structure will emerge as it is made and you must simply listen and trust, as the Pueblo people do, that meaning will be made" (Brown, 171).
Another good example of a portion of Silko's text that serves to alienate the reader and upset that reader's worldview is the part where Silko describes the creation of the whites through witchery – "it was Indian witchery that made white people in the first place" (Silko, 132).
www.wdog.com /rider/writings/silko.htm   (2048 words)

  
 Teaching Unit on Leslie Marmon Silko’s
Silko’s "Yellow Woman" is a story which parallels the older Keres stories about a woman who is taken from her home, usually by an evil Ka’tsina.
In this story (and many of her other stories), Silko includes ideas and elements from the oral tradition to create a bridge between these two ontologically different means of communication.
Because she bases her story on a specific tradition of stories, Silko thematically engages the concept of change: namely, how the oral tradition lives by continuing to take in new elements ideas in relation to a changing world.
www.uwm.edu /Dept/English/Alliance/silkounit.htm   (605 words)

  
 Heath Anthology of American LiteratureLeslie Marmon Silko (Laguna) - Author Page
Leslie Marmon Silko grew up on the Laguna Pueblo Reservation in the house where her father, Lee H. Marmon, was born.
Silko’s second novel, Almanac of the Dead (1991), sounds an alarm in the face of escalating interpersonal violence and greed threatening to destroy humanity at the end of the twentieth century.
Silko models her fiction on the Laguna storytelling tradition, which she describes as patterned like the web of a spider.
college.hmco.com /english/lauter/heath/4e/students/author_pages/contemporary/silkolaguna_le.html   (733 words)

  
 An Interview with Leslie Marmon Silko
Silko's first published book is the collection of poems Laguna Woman (1974) which draws richly upon her tribal ancestry.
Silko has lived and taught in New Mexico and Alaska as well as in Arizona, where she currently resides in Tucson.
Silko's correspondence with the poet James Wright was edited after Wright's death by his widow Anne Wright under the title The Delicacy and Strength of Lace (1986).
www.altx.com /interviews/silko.html   (4551 words)

  
 Tony's Story by Leslie Marmon Silko. Essay by Helga Hoel © 1993-2005
Silko was of course too young to understand it at that time, but the story about the killing must have been told repeatedly as she grew up.
When Silko refers to this event and the fictionalized version of it in her essay in Critical Fictions, it is Ortiz' story she refers to, not her own.
She said Leslie Silko was obsessed with the notion of balance.
home.online.no /~helhoel/silko.htm   (2955 words)

  
 VG: Artist Biography: Silko, Leslie Marmon
In 1948 Leslie Marmon Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, of Pueblo, Laguna, Mexican, and white descent.
Silko is the 'first acclaimed Native-American woman author' and has used this role to bring attention to many controversial political ideas.
In as much as Silko needs to be a part of this oral tradition, she needs to be the teller.
voices.cla.umn.edu /vg/Bios/entries/silko_leslie_marmon.html   (1220 words)

  
 Alibris: Leslie Marmon Silko
Silko recreates the stories of her family in poetry and prose.
Silko's book emphasizes the importance of storytelling in Pueblo culture, and discusses the implications of the ways the white man's culture has tried to destroy the tradition.
Leslie Marmon Silko is a poet and novelist.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Leslie_Marmon_Silko   (628 words)

  
 Laguna Woman
As a child, Leslie Marmon grew up attaching herself, in memory and imagination, to the village and then to the land around it; and because this is Laguna land, many of the stories she grew up with were stories from the Keresan oral tradition, the stories of her father's people and their shared history.
Silko's own affinity for this place reflects, perhaps, her own felt "position," occupying as she does a marginal site with respect to both Laguna "within" and the dominant Anglo mainstream "out there"and as she depicts it, it's not a bad place to be.
The first Marmons to come to Laguna, Ohioans Walter and his brother Robert, came as surveyors just after the Civil War, married Laguna women, and stayed on, Walter as a school teacher and Robert as a trader; both eventually were elected to serve as Governor of the Pueblo.
www.richmond.edu /~rnelson/woman.html   (2248 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko was raised on Laguna Pueblo, 50 miles west of Albuquerque.
Leslie Marmon Silko has taught in New Mexico, Alaska, and Arizona and holds academic appointments at both the Universities of New Mexico and Arizona.
Leslie Marmon Silko demonstrates that storytelling is not only alive but still imbued with the power to move and deeply affect us.
www.nwhp.org /tlp/biographies/silko/bio.html   (658 words)

  
 Indianz.Com Message Board - Leslie Marmon Silko........   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The 2005 recipient is Leslie Marmon Silko, a renowned novelist, essayist and poet.
Silko demonstrates that storytelling is not only alive but still imbued with the power to move and deeply affect us.
This was Silko’s first collection of poems written when she was teaching at the Navajo Community College in Tsaile, Ariz. This is a highly introspective collection of poems full of images of animals, landscapes, weather, and colors.
www.indianz.com /board/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=12850   (1231 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The poet and novelist Leslie Marmon Silko was born on March 5, 1948 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. She is of mixed Laguna Pueblo, Mexican and white heritage and she grew up on the Laguna Indian Reservation in eastern New Mexico.
Silko was influenced by the stories of her people that she heard while growing up on the reservation and they gave her a sense of identity and pride.
In addition to writing, Leslie Marmon Silko has taught English at the Navajo Community College, at the University of New Mexico, and at the University of Arizona.
www.distinguishedwomen.com /biographies/silko-lm.html   (333 words)

  
 Antigone Books   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko, a poet and fiction writer, was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1948, and grew up on the Laguna Pueblo reservation.
In this volumn Leslie Marmon Silko demonstrates that storytelling is not only alive but still imbued with the power to move and deeply affect us.
Here Silko weaves a magical spell, as she re-creates the ancient stories, in prose and poetry (the distinction for the Native American is far less than in the European tradition), spicing them with the realities of her own experience.
www.antigonebooks.com /NASApp/store/IndexJsp?s=localauthors&page=254517   (1203 words)

  
 American Passages - Unit 1. Native Voices: Authors
Leslie Marmon Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the house where her father was also born.
Like Louise Erdrich, Silko explores mixed identity in many of her works, particularly the situation of being "neither white nor fully traditional Indian." Silko received her B.A. from the University of New Mexico—graduating magna cum laude in 1969—and after three semesters of law school decided instead to become a teacher and a writer.
As the novel progresses, language heals both the characters and the readers; stories from the Pueblo oral tradition are interwoven with contemporary updates of traditional healing rituals and discussions of the development of the atomic bomb and uranium mining.
www.learner.org /amerpass/unit01/authors-7.html   (601 words)

  
 Lislie Marmon Silko's Ceremony
As Silko reveals in Ceremony, however, the years from World War II to the present have presented new threats to the Pueblos, which, although more subtle than the early Spanish conquests, are even more dangerous, and must be fought if the Pueblo culture is to continue.
Silko's answer to this question is revealed by the two people who manage to save Tayo from the witchery of the world.
Silko argues for the necessity of cultural change in another way: the transfer of traditional oral myths into written form.
history.hanover.edu /hhr/hhr93_2.html   (2513 words)

  
 Conversations with Leslie Marmon Silko
Leslie Marmon Silko, one of America's best known Native authors, was born in 1948 and grew up at Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico, of mixed Laguna, Mexican, and white ancestry.
Silko grants interviews rarely, but the sixteen included here are generously wide-ranging and deeply honest.
Before she decided to become a writer, Silko was a student in the Indian law program at the University of New Mexico.
www.upress.state.ms.us /catalog/fall2000/conv_silko.html   (396 words)

  
 Writing Assignment on Leslie Marmon Silko's "Yellow Woman"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Assuming that Allen's version is something close to what Silko herself heard from her grandfather as a young girl, pick a couple of these changes and say what you think led Silko to make them.
Pick one of these impressions and explain how Silko has designed her own story to convey that same impression, or some different one.
Cite one of Ephanie's questions that Silko's story does not address, and explain why you think Silko was not concerned with it, given what she focuses on as the main locus of interest in the tale.
www-personal.ksu.edu /~lyman/english320/wa-Silko-YW.htm   (405 words)

  
 Vicky Chen   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko was born in 1948 and grew up in New Mexico.
  Leslie Marmon Silko is a significant part of Introduction to Native American Literature, because Ceremony is studied in-depth and analyzed with both Native American and Western perspectives in mind.
  A biography of Leslie Marmon Silko’s life and the relationship between her background and her writings.
darkwing.uoregon.edu /~bridge/2001/BRLMSilko.htm   (307 words)

  
 Fiction: Leslie Marmon Silko   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Silko's work reflects her belief in the importance of the preservation of Native American traditions and ways of life.
In her second novel, Ceremony (1981), Silko uses Native American stories, in the form of prose and poetry, to retell her own family's story.
Silko received an award from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1974 and a MacArthur Foundation grant in 1981.
www.bedfordstmartins.com /litlinks/fiction/silko.htm   (345 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko, Gardens in the Dunes
Silko offers this collecting behavior in contrast to that of Edward Palmer and his sister Susan, who both participate in far more destructive forms of plant harvesting and relocation.
Although Silko never actually names the dam that is under construction, its location on the Colorado River near the Parker Reservation and her mention of the Chemehuevi, Mojave and Havasupai people living in the area suggest that it must be the Parker Dam, which wasn't built until the 1930s.
Leslie Marmon Silko is a Laguna Pueblo who lives in Tucson.
www.greenmanreview.com /book/book_silko_gardensinthedunes.html   (1221 words)

  
 Leslie Marmon Silko - "The Man to Send Rain Clouds"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Leslie Marmon Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1948.
Silko first be-came known as a poet with Laguna Woman (1974).
Silko has also published Storyteller (1981) which includes poetry, short stories, family history, myths, and photographs.
www.people.memphis.edu /~kahillis/readings/63_silko-man_send_rain_clouds.htm   (1795 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Marmon in the Special Collections Department of the Zimmerman Library, U.N.M. Another source I've found helpful is Leslie A. White, "The Acoma Indians." Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology (Washington, DC: U. Government Printing Office, 1932).
It is important to note that Silko's fiction is a blending of traditional with modern elements.
And as in "Lullaby," which ends with a song, many of Silko's other works are a blend of prose and poetry.
www.georgetown.edu /tamlit/newsletter/2/!suggest.htm   (884 words)

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