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Topic: Liberum veto


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 Liberum veto -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
This rule evolved from a (Everyone being of one mind) unanimity principle, and the latter from the federative character of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, which was essentially a (An organization formed by merging several groups or parties) federation of countries.
It is commonly, and erroneously, believed that a Sejm was first disrupted by means of liberum veto by a (Click link for more info and facts about Trakai) Trakai deputy, Władysław Siciński, in 1652.
The liberum veto was abolished by the May 3rd, 1791, Constitution (adopted by a (Click link for more info and facts about confederated sejm) confederated sejm), which permanently established the principle of majority rule.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/l/li/liberum_veto.htm   (384 words)

  
 Veto
The veto originated with the Roman tribunes who had the power to unilaterally refuse legislation passed by the Roman senate.
In Westminster Systems and most constitutional monarchies, the power to veto legislation by withholding the Royal Assent is a rarely-used reserve power of the monarch, representative of the monarch, or figurehead president who has replaced the monarch.
The Queen may veto a law that has been given royal assent by the Governor-General within one year of the legislation being assented to.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/v/ve/veto.html   (574 words)

  
 Articles - Veto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
In Australia, the Queen may veto a law that has been given royal assent by the Governor-General within one year of the legislation being assented to.
The legislative veto, by which Congress had nullified certain exercises of powers the body had delegated to the executive branch, was ruled unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court in INS v.
The veto power in the United States Constitution was derived from the British method of Royal Assent.
www.lightmag.com /articles/Veto   (697 words)

  
 Veto Article, Veto Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The word veto comes from Latin and literally means I forbid.It is used to denote that a certain party has the right to unilaterally stop a certain piece of legislation.
In the United States, the President is able to veto legislation passed by the Congress, butthis right is not absolute.
Although details vary, it is not uncommonfor a piece of legislation that has undergone a line item veto to be returned to the legislative body for final approval; theycan either accept the amended legislation or decide not to pass it at all in its new form.
www.anoca.org /states/power/veto.html   (555 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - John II, king of Poland (Polish History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
War with Russia ended only in 1667, with the cession of the eastern part of Ukraine to the czar.
During John's reign the liberum veto (by which any deputy could dissolve the diet and annul its decisions) was greatly abused.
The king and his French consort, Louise Marie de Gonzague (widow of Ladislaus IV), were childless; their efforts to nominate a successor evoked several rebellions of the nobles.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/J/John2Pol.html   (401 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Liberum veto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Updated 273 days 5 hours 24 minutes ago.
This rule evolved from a unanimity principle, and the latter from the federative character of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, which was essentially a federation of countries.
In the first half of the 18th century, it became increasingly common for Sejm sessions to be broken up by liberum veto, as the Commonwealth's neighbors — chiefly Russia and Prussia —; found this a useful tool to frustrate attempts at reforming and strengthening the Commonwealth.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Liberum-veto   (417 words)

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