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Topic: Literary journalism


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In the News (Thu 21 Jun 18)

  
  A Sourcebook of American Literary Journalism — www.greenwood.com
"Literary journalism" has been widely recognized as a genre since Tom Wolfe's description of the "new journalism" in 1973, although journalism using techniques of fiction has existed for far longer.
Such writing was not "new" journalism and therefore simply a type of journalism; nor was it "factual" fiction, merely a type of realistic fiction.
The roots of this "new journalism" are traced, and ideas of the theorists of this genre are explicated.
www.greenwood.com /catalog/CYJ%252f.aspx   (700 words)

  
 Literary Journalism - Program
Literary journalism is an emerging field of study that is known by varying names, including creative nonfiction, the literature of fact and literary nonfiction.
Literary Journalism majors take three intensive writing seminars, and are expected to develop a portfolio of work by graduation which they can present as evidence of their skill for purposes of employment or future education.
One is LJ 20, “Introduction to Literary Journalism.” In this course, students will open their acquaintance with the field, reading selected exemplary texts, trying their own hand at literary journalism, and exploring how this type of nonfiction responds to and shapes experience.
www.humanities.uci.edu /litjourn/program/program.html   (745 words)

  
  The Media Report: 23 June  2005  - Literary Journalism
Vivian Winter did an Honours thesis on literary journalism last year at the University of Queensland, and what she found in her thesis was that there was a lot of enthusiasm for literary journalism among journalists and also among newspaper section editors.
Literary journalism is better researched and better written than daily journalism; literary journalism plumbs emotional depths in ways that daily journalism studiously avoids, or clunks around.
Literary in this country at least still is a sort of tiptoe word, isn’t it, it’s The Arts, and we don’t really have a strong tradition of links between the arts and literature, and journalism.
www.abc.net.au /rn/talks/8.30/mediarpt/stories/s1394635.htm   (4271 words)

  
 Look What I Found In My Brain!: Literary journalism
Literary journalism refers to the use of fictional techniques in writing a work of nonfiction.
Literary journalism is cousin to nonfiction genres such as travel writing, personal essays, memoirs, and to pseudofiction (fictionalized accounts of true stories).
Detractors of literary journalism accuse the genre of lacking objectivity and factuality; however, the best literary journalists make sure to keep the covenant of truth between themselves and their readers and maintain the essential factuality of their stories.
www.sff.net /people/lucy-snyder/brain/2005/11/literary-journalism.html   (365 words)

  
 Journalism Studies 20 - Introduction to Literary Journalism Student Page
In this lesson you will learn the basics of literary journalism, a type of journalism that is starkly different from traditional journalism in a number of key ways.
Choose an element of journalism we have learned about like libel, structure, how to interview or how to structure a story.
- identify the characteristics of new journalism and literary journalism.
olc.spsd.sk.ca /DE/journalismstudies20/print_journalism/about_literary_journalism.htm   (353 words)

  
 Journalism Media | Print Journalism | Journalism Writing | Public Journalism | Journalism Ethics | Literary Journalism
They also published a scholarly journal as an outlet for the findings of French scientists working in Egypt.
The tradition of journalism in Egypt is one of the most long- established in the Arab world.
Just as significant was the emergence of a new profession journalism - and thus a new source of livelihood for writers.
www.egyptattraction.com /journalism.html   (974 words)

  
 Literary Journalism - Program
Literary journalism is an emerging field of study that is known by varying names, including creative nonfiction, the literature of fact and literary nonfiction.
Literary Journalism majors take three intensive writing seminars, and are expected to develop a portfolio of work by graduation which they can present as evidence of their skill for purposes of employment or future education.
One is LJ 20, “Introduction to Literary Journalism.” In this course, students will open their acquaintance with the field, reading selected exemplary texts, trying their own hand at literary journalism, and exploring how this type of nonfiction responds to and shapes experience.
www.hnet.uci.edu /litjourn/program/program.html   (745 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Journalism 112.10, Advanced Reporting: an upper-level course requiring students to write in-class exercises and outside assignments to hone the writing skills needed to bring clarity, context, and objectivity to news in a world of converging media.
Journalism 5606, Literary Aspects of Journalism: an upper-level course that studies the literary aspects of journalism as exemplified in, and influenced by, works of British and American writers.
Journalism Resources: an annotated listing of resources compiled in support of academic journalism departments and professional journalists from cyberjournalism to media law to race and gender in journalism.
writing.umn.edu /tww/WID/journalism/journalismindex.htm   (1710 words)

  
 Literary journalism, casey journalism, journalism degree
Literary journalism Literary journalists were characterized as the young inheritors of the so-called.
Literary journalism This was in the mid-1970s; since then literary journalism, or narrative nonfiction, has become an increasingly popular form for both magazine writing and.
One of the foremost practitioners of literary journalism,.
www.film-projector.com /journalism/literary_journalism.html   (825 words)

  
 Nieman Narrative Digest - Essays
A few distinguished essayists we retrospectively link to literary journalism did indeed commit acts that, if done by writers today, would be considered downright sinful: They combined or improved upon scenes, aggregated characters, refurbished quotations, and otherwise altered what they knew to be the nature of their material.
In literary journalism, the narrator is neither the impersonal, dutiful explainer and qualifier of academic writing, who presents research material carefully but without special consideration of readers, nor the seemingly objective and factual, judgment-suspending, orthodox informant of newswriting.
The defining mark of literary journalism is the personality of the writer, the individual and intimate voice of a whole, candid person not representing, defending, or speaking on behalf of any institution, not a newspaper, corporation, government, ideology, field of study, chamber of commerce, or travel destination.
www.nieman.harvard.edu /narrative/digest/essays/breakablerules-kramer.html   (5259 words)

  
 Literary license. - By Meghan O'Rourke - Slate Magazine
The very currency of journalism is fact; to toy with it once is to devalue it (and your integrity) permanently, whether you are a great stylist or a hack.
Newspaper journalism always ought to be thoroughly factual.
Where fiction is an inclusive genre, one that allows for its conventions to be violated, journalism relies on a system of conventions intended to guarantee objectivity.
www.slate.com /id/2086286   (1533 words)

  
 Robert Boynton
The New Journalism was a truly avant garde movement that expanded journalism's rhetorical and literary scope by placing the author at the center of the story, channeling a character's thoughts, using nonstandard punctuation and exploding traditional narrative forms.
While some are literary stylists of note (Richard Ben Cramer, Michael Lewis and Ron Rosenbaum, for instance), their most significant innovations have involved experiments with the way they reported the story, rather than the language they used to tell it.
Second, McPhee's influence on the New New Journalism can been seen in the catholic approach he takes toward subjects: anything–from geology and nuclear weapons to fishing and basketball–is fair game for the literary journalist, as long as it is prodigiously researched and painstakingly reported.
www.robertboynton.com /book.htm   (1542 words)

  
 THE PERILS OF LITERARY JOURNALISM
That is to say, the limits of journalism, up to where it is possible to advance with a live, real, hot, but restricted material are trespassed and extended with the unlimited resources of literature.
Literary journalism, a bridge between literature and journalism, or literature riding on journalism, arise suspicions.
US journalism, the author writes, is not the only one that has broken that rigid and imaginative frontier, although it did provide the drive that journalism, reduced to the field of tangible veracity of facts and its most traditional forms, needed.
www.cubanow.net /global/loader.php?&secc=7&item=633&cont=show.php   (935 words)

  
 Literary Journalism Techniques Create Compelling Blackhawk Down Web Site Newspaper Research Journal - Find Articles
The phrase new journalism described a kind of writing popular in the 1960s that was formally recognized in a book of that title by Tom Wolfe.4 Wolfe's description of this style is that "it just might be possible to write journalism that would...
One of the driving forces behind the literary journalism movement is growing research evidence indicating that the reading public prefers news writing with a narrative structure.
Qualities of literary journalism that were searched for and examined were dramatic story form; Wolfe's scene-byscene construction, dialogue in full and third person point of view; Sims' accuracy, voice, structure and responsibility; Kramer's use of digressions to amplify and reframe events; and cliffhanger endings.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3677/is_200410/ai_n9473641   (712 words)

  
 CPCW literary journalism fellowships   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This student will set out to write a 4,000-word nonfiction piece of long-form journalism that is of publishable quality.
Rather, this is a long-form nonfiction "assignment" enabled by a fellowship - a "freelance" writing "job" yet with guidance by an eminent editor and writer.
The successful student writer chosen for the Literary Journalism Fellowship will receive an author's fee of $2500.00.
www.writing.upenn.edu /eisenberg.html   (547 words)

  
 [No title]
Literary journalism, a specific type of "new" journalism, utilizes descriptive detail, realistic dialogue, and dramatic literary techniques to enliven nonfiction reporting.
Literary journalism focuses on the exterior world in the same referential way that garden variety journalism does.
This is a course in "close writing" in a wide range of dynamic and innovative genres of creative non-fiction, from the personal essay to literary journalism to the travel essay, with a focus on stylistic experimentation and development.
www.lycos.com /info/literary-journalism.html   (555 words)

  
 [No title]
Literary journalism possesses a guarantee of credibility, which is a crucial part of this form of a mimetic contract.
Literary journalism, however, by using direct descriptions of socialist reality, which pretended to objectivity, was ironically quite effective in an environment of omnipresent censorship at condemning that world.
The authenticity of the facts presented in literary journalism has to be unquestionable, however the authors make sure to reserve their right to choose the context and to model the whole composition according to criteria which they selected.
cas.uchicago.edu /workshops/minorslav/Proposal-2-19-06.doc   (6052 words)

  
 Literary Journalism
Focuses on the implications of the emergence of the New Journalists for the tradition of literary journalism in the U.S. and the effect of new journalism on the literary community.
The narrative structure of literary journalism is compared to the "literary transformation" or "displacement" observed in Greek Tragic Drama.
PN4726.M5 Forty examples of "new journalism" are distinguished from traditional journalism by the inclusion of the writer's relationship to the event being described.
www.otterbein.edu /resources/library/cmbook/2005_2006/litjourn.htm   (283 words)

  
 Eat Healthy. Live Happy. - Literary Journalism
In Literary Journalism, editors Norman Sims and Mark Kramer have collected the finest examples of literary journalism from both the masters of the genre who have been working for decades and the new voices freshly arrived on the national scene.
What I especially valued were the introductions on the art of "literary journalism" and the introductions to each of the journalists.
These are some of the finest feature journalists in the country, each with his own style and emphasis, and all with the ability to look at small stories with great insight into their human dimensions.
www.valuerecipes.com /index.php/trade/productinfo/ASIN/0345382226   (498 words)

  
 J560: Literary Journalism
A working notion for "literary": It is subjective (no rigid separation between subject and object) but universal (has meaning for all the rest of us); it possesses unity/coherence/integrity at multiple levels (subject, point of view, perceptions, structure, language, etc.); it is unconventional, non-formulaic; the right people say it is "literary".
Working notions for journalism: It is non-fiction and written or produced by an identified journalist and/or published in journalistic outlets, or in literary outlets first, then reprinted in journalistic medium (as in the Utne Reader).
Working notions for "literary journalism': Non-fiction that is produced by an identified journalist and/or published in identifiable journalistic outlets, and developed in such a way that it is (or will be) defined as "literary." (A piece of literary journalism will make use of literary techniques traditionally found in literary narratives, literary essays, and/or poems).
www.journalism.indiana.edu /syllabi/stocking/j560summer02   (2613 words)

  
 International Association for Literary Journalism Studies   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The organization, founded on 14 July 2006 following the 1st International Conference on Literary Journalism, promotes the study of literary journalism/literary reportage more so than its practices and is devoted to the teaching and researching of literary journalism and literary journalists throughout the world.
The academic journal Literary Journalism Studies, an official organ of IALJS, is a peer-reviewed journal aimed the publication of research of the highest standard ranging from the recovery of "lost" examples of literary journalism/literary reportage throughout the world to the examination of more traditional forms of the genre (old and new).
At the heart of IALJS is the committment not only to insure literary journalism's and literary reportage's acceptance as a legitimate academic subject within both English and Journalism Departments, but also to explore the limits of what defines "literary journalism" past and present.
www.ialjs.org   (215 words)

  
 NPR : Excerpt: 'The New New Journalism'
When I began teaching a course on American literary journalism, I was puzzled by the 30-year gap between the end of what was considered the New Journalism and the contemporary writers who were my focus.
Wolfe's New Journalism was a truly avant-garde movement that expanded journalism's rhetorical and literary scope by placing the author at the center of the story, channeling a character's thoughts, using nonstandard punctuation, and exploding traditional narrative forms.
The New Journalism uses complete dialogue, rather than the snippets quoted in daily journalism; proceeds scene by scene, much as in a movie; incorporates varying points of view, rather than telling a story solely from the perspective of the narrator; and pays close attention to status details about the appearance and behavior of its characters.
www.npr.org /templates/story/story.php?storyId=4750680   (2112 words)

  
 Journalism Senior Seminar
Goals: To understand and appreciate the storytelling role of journalism through readings, discussions and writing exercises; to round out the undergraduate journalism education by introducing students to literary journalism and other genres that stretch traditional journalistic precepts; to enrich the reading and writing life.
The presentation should address: the author's background and place in journalism, the work's significance as part of the genre and how the work fits or doesn't fit the literary journalism mold, citing specific examples from the work.
The presentation should address: the author's background and place in journalism and literature, the work's significance as part of the genre and how the work fits or doesn't fit the literary journalism mold, citing specific examples from the work.
home.gwu.edu /~almay/sensemsyll.htm   (2041 words)

  
 Literary Journalism Spring 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As a genre, literary journalism blends the best elements of traditional journalism with the narrative engagement of fiction.
As a result, literary journalism produces work that is as engaging as fiction, largely characterized by sophisticated narratives that look beyond surface detail to uncover the larger networks of meaning in everyday life.
Expose each of you to a range of literary journalism readings to develop your understanding of the genre.
pages.cabrini.edu /hhalbert/spring2004/litjourn/syllabus.html   (1276 words)

  
 The Connection.org : Literary Journalism
Tom Wolfe, a quarter of a century ago in his manifesto about "the New Journalism," said that the novel was dying, because a new group of social-literary upstarts were inventing a new genre - literary journalism.
Of course, elegant and informed journalism using a literary voice was around long before the "New Journalism," and Wolfe has since left the trade to write novels.
Literary journalism has flourished, even as many of it's traditional print vehicles have struggled.
www.theconnection.org /shows/2000/01/20000121_b_main.asp   (606 words)

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