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Topic: Locative Cases


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  Locative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and separative case.
Instead of the locative, the Finnish language has the inessive, which indicates a location inside of a place, and the adessive, which indicates a location outside of a place.
In the Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form (-t/-tt) used only in a few city/town names along with the Inessive case or Superessive case.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Locative_case   (304 words)

  
 Finnish language noun cases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The basic meaning of this case is a lack of telicity, that is, it is not indicated whether the intended result has been achieved.
The name "general locatives" is sometimes used of the essive and translative cases (as well as partitive above) because their oldest meanings imply that they have been used to indicate location.
The prolative is not considered to be a case in the official grammar.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Finnish_language_noun_cases   (1403 words)

  
 Locative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The locative case corresponds vaguely to the preposition "in", "at", or "by" of English and indicates a final location of action or a time of the action.
In languages such as Finnish, there is a set of six distinct locative cases that express different relationships to location.
In Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form used only in a few town names instead of or along with the Inessive case or Superessive case.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/l/lo/locative_case.html   (172 words)

  
 ABLATIVE CASE FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In linguistics, the ablative case is a noun case found in several languages, including Armenian, Latin, Sanskrit and the Finno-Ugric_languages.
In Finnish, the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the meaning "from off of", e.g.
It is an outer locative case, used just as the adessive and allative cases to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").
www.amysflowershop.com /ablative_case   (240 words)

  
 the -s case
Indeed according to one division of cases which combines coherency (that is spatial connexion) and orientation (direction of movement), the allative and dative belong to the same class: negative coherency with positive orientation (it means routing to something/one or activity for something/one).
It is used as the locative (or at least locatively, for the case may denote possessiveness, as suggested in note 2, still falling into the same category with the locative) and it is a short variant thereof.
It is apparent that the -s case is here used as a variant of -sse, although there is one little difference: the relative pronoun yassen "wherein" is in the plural form in FM agreeing in number with tellumar "vaults" from the previous verse, whereas yas is in singular.
www.elvish.org /elm/scase.html   (5918 words)

  
 [Locative] locative is a case not a place   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
It seems a little unfortunate that the locative case as applied to media and referred to as "locative media" has been often misinterpreted as "location" and "location media" by anglophones and others.
The moniker and the discourse of locative media arose here in Riga as we studied the Latvian language which does include this locative case, as does Russian (as the prepositional case), Finnish, Sanskrit and Latin.
It would make an excellent study for some cunning linguists to analyze the various world languages and their use of locative and related cases and how they apply to media, and I think this would be very informative for the locative media scene.
db.x-i.net /locative/2004/000385.html   (408 words)

  
 Vaja Case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Case (KAH-seh) is also a plural form of the Italian word casa.
In the Finnish language, the Allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto".
This is especially the case within the object-oriented community where they originated, but their applicability is not restricted to object-oriented systems, because use cases are not object orientated in nature.
www.wwwtln.com /finance/188/vaja-case.html   (579 words)

  
 Ablative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The ablative case is a case found in Latin and Sanskrit.
The Latin ablative combines the Indo-European ablative (indicating "from"), instrumental (indicating "with" or "by") and locative (indicating "in") cases.
In the Finnish language (Suomi), it is the sixth of the locative cases with the basic meaning "from off of" - a poor English equivalent, but necessary to distinguish it from "from out of" which would be Elative case.
usapedia.com /a/ablative-case.html   (131 words)

  
 case on Encyclopedia.com
In Latin, six cases are indicated by changes in inflection—nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative.
The hypothetical ancestor of the Indo-European languages used eight cases, the above six plus the instrumental and locative cases.
A kibbutz arms depot, a teacher takes his turn as watchman, and is given arms in case of an enemy night attack.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/c1/case-lang.asp   (761 words)

  
 7.3. Case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Both the locative and the ergative cases are marked with the suffix <-e> or <-ʔe>.
The vocative case is used in directly addressing entities possessed of a soul, such as animals, humans, gods and personified ideas or objects.
The comparative case consists of the locative/ergative suffix <-(ʔ)e> and the suffix and is used in comparisons.
www.valdyas.org /~boud/barushlani/ch07s03.html   (282 words)

  
 Cases in Indo-European Languages: an article by Cyril Babaev
Case is a grammar category of nominal parts of speech which expresses their syntactic relation to other words of the sentence.
Though they could all be declined in the same cases, they all played their own roles in the sentence and in the language.
Nominative was the case of the subject in the sentence.
indoeuro.bizland.com /archive/article10.html   (2973 words)

  
 Cases in Finnish
akkusatiivi (accusative, objective, the case of an object) is often listed as a case, too, although its form coincides with the form of the nominative or the form of the genitive, except for the personal pronouns which have specific accusative forms (minut, sinut, etc.).
Among the cases, the six cases inessiivi, elatiivi, illatiivi, adessiivi, ablatiivi, allatiivi form a rather orthogonal system of locative cases, with the first three referring to inner relations (in, from, into) and the rest to corresponding outer relations.
Sometimes a case, eksessiivi, with ending -nta (combined from the -na of essiivi and -ta of partitiivi) is suggested, meaning 'from the role of', thus making the system of "pseudo-locative" cases more orthogonal.
www.cs.tut.fi /~jkorpela/finnish-cases.html   (1258 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - case (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
case, in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus, "friend" (nominative); amicum (accusative); amici (genitive); and amico (ablative and dative).
In modern English, nouns are marked for two cases : common or nominative (e.g., man) and possessive or genitive (man's).
In Latin, six cases are indicated by changes in inflection : nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/case-lang.html   (308 words)

  
 Canku Ota - May 17, 2003 - History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan GRAMMAR OF THE OTTAWA AND CHIPPEWA ...
The locative case denotes the relation usually expressed in English by the use of a preposition, or by the genitive, dative and ablative in Latin.
The objective case is like the nominative when the subject is in the 1st or 2d person, but when the subject is in the 3d person the object takes the termination "won."
Chicago is derived from sha-gog-ong, the locative case of the Ottawa word she-gog, meaning skunk; nominative, she-gog; locative, she-gog-ong; objective, she-gog or she-gog-won.
turtletrack.org /CO_FirstPerson/Blackbird/CO_04052003_Blackbird_GN.htm   (885 words)

  
 GUJARATI - Online Information article about GUJARATI   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The general oblique case is the same as the nominative, except in the case of strong masculine and neuter nouns in o and a respectively, where it ends in a, not C. This a-termination is characteristic of the outer band of languages, and is one of the sur vivals already referred to.
It is derived from the Apabhrariisa genitive form in -aha, corresponding to the Magadhi Pr.
house; raja-na dikara-ne, to the king's son (nil is in the oblique case masculine to agree with dik'ra) ; raja-ne ghare, in the king's house.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /GUI_HAN/GUJARATI.html   (3467 words)

  
 Livonian Nouns   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Livonian nouns are generally declined in eight cases (nominative, genitive, dative, partitive, instrumental, illative, inessive, and elative).
Few words are declined in the three external locative cases, the adessive, allative, and ablative.
Unlike the three external locative cases, the instructive does not appear in any of the more contemporary materials intended for students of the language.
homepage.mac.com /uldis/livonia/nouns.html   (229 words)

  
 Against the Feature Bundle Theory of Case - Kracht (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Abstract: Case is usually taken to be represented in syntax by a feature or, more generally, a feature bundle.
Locative cases tend to be systematically organized along the two orthogonal axes of mode and...
The Structure of Local Cases and Its Relevance for the Study of..
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /kracht00against.html   (417 words)

  
 A Comparative Latin Grammar
Cases may seem obscure for those who have no idea what is their meaning in the language.
The ablative case was one of the eight Proto-Indo-European noun cases.
The locative case existed in the Archaic period, but was gradually assimilated by ablative in the Classical time.
indoeuro.bizland.com /project/grammar/grammar62.html   (5028 words)

  
 WebRoots Library U.S. Natives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The locative termination is "ong," "eng," or "ing." The objective case is like the nominative when the subject is in the 1st or 2d person, but when the subject is in the 3d person the object takes the termination "won." Example of locative and objective cases.
Chicago is derived from sha-gog- ong, the locative case of the Ottawa word she-gog, meaning skunk; nominative, she-gog; locative, she-gog-ong; objective, she-gog or she-gog- won.
Or the same may be expressed, Po-taw- wen ke-zhap ke-ze-gun-ing ("ing" forming locative case, with the preposition implied); and, Maw-yaw-tchaw-gwen (the latter form of verb expressing subjunctive mood).
www.webroots.org /library/usanativ/hotoaci5.html   (1924 words)

  
 Articles - Illative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Illative is, in the Finnish language, Estonian language and the Hungarian language, the third of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "into (the inside of)".
The illative case, denoting direction of movement, is used rarely in the modern standard Lithuanian, although it's used in common spoken language, especially in its certain dialects.
The illative case was used extensively in older Lithuanian; the first Lithuanian grammar by Daniel Klein, that mentions both illative and į+accusative, calls the usage of the illative "more elegant".
gaple.com /articles/Illative_case?mySession=2021f7a7bc922dc643d24ade...   (453 words)

  
 [No title]
A special case is "opposite" - the reverse direction from the relative direction of the object of preposition and the subject of the sentence.
The "opposite" direction is that direction that the subject of the sentence would have to travel in, in order to pass through the object of the preposition and continue on the other side.
A special case is "opposite" - the reverse > direction from the relative direction of the object of > preposition and the subject of the sentence.
www.mindspring.com /~jimhenry/conlang/prep.msg   (3401 words)

  
 Constructed Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Since the locative was associated with allative and ablative already, it made sense to make it refer not just to place or time, but now also state of being.
I’ve also stuck in an instrumental case which can mean, “by way/means/method of”, “by use of the facilities of (location)”, or “in the manner of (quality)”.
As locatives they mean “to” and “from” somewhere, and locative modifying them indicates WHERE the head is going to or coming from.
www.livejournal.com /community/conlangs   (5203 words)

  
 jsl_9_2.htmll
In the unmarked case, the upper V is [–ITER], but it switches to [+ITER] to implement a [–PERF] specification on I when P is lexicalized.
The data demonstrate that the use of the locative case for the directional placement is common in Ukrainian; however, this use is acceptable only under certain conditions.
It is shown that the most important factor that influences the acceptability of the locative is the degree of verb and utterance Transitivity, which depends on grammatical, semantic, and pragmatic factors.
www.slavica.com /jsl/jsl_9_2.html   (658 words)

  
 [No title]
Hungarian language, the third of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "into".
An example from Estonian would be "korterisse" (into the apartment).
The other locative cases in Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian are:
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Illative_case   (45 words)

  
 Case Backhoes -- Recommendations and Resources
Their versatility and compact size makes them one of the most popular urban construction vehicles.
Other topics related to Case Backhoes: Cash Back
Categories similar to Case Backhoes: Cateye Cs 1000
www.becomingapediatrician.com /health/28/case-backhoes.html   (1076 words)

  
 SBF Glossary: LQ to l8r
In fact, the LRV was kept within 9.5 km of the LEM in case that became necessary.) The batteries served not only as electric power sources but as heat sinks for the electronics.
The locative case is used without a preposition.
These locative cases originally developed as postpositions (like prepositions but following a noun) used earlier were assimilated to the nouns.
www.plexoft.com /SBF/L04.html   (9026 words)

  
 Why the Ablative, Locative, and Instrumental Cases Fell Together in Latin (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Why the Ablative, Locative, and Instrumental Cases Fell Together in Latin
1 since the inherited endings of the three cases were, in general, distinct, and the resulting Latin ablative endings came from any of the three original cases, depending on inflectional class.
First-, second-, and third-declension -a(d) -o(d) -(d) generalize an inherited ablative pattern, as do the -bus plurals, but fifth-declension -e (never attested with d) appears to be instrumental, and third-declension -e is originally locative, or possibly instrumental (so Sihler 1995:285,...
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /464336.html   (209 words)

  
 case
case, in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see
The names of the most common cases derive from Greek by way of Latin translation, as does the term
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