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Topic: Lord Burlington


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  Burlington House | British History Online
Burlington House.' Other representations of the gate seem to show that the double date was not in fact to be seen in the position Carter appears to suggest and it is uncertain what authority lies behind his note.
With respect to the inspiration of Burlington's reshaping of the house it is to be noted that the first alterations seem clearly to have preceded his first visit to Italy.
Burlington House, not greatly altered, was to be taken for the Academy's offices, and galleries were to be built behind it, south of the London University building.
www.british-history.ac.uk /report.asp?compid=41482   (19112 words)

  
 Burlington House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's high profile temporary art exhibitions.
During Burlington's minority James Gibbs made exterior alterations to the house, including a semicircular doric colonnade which was later praised by Sir William Chambers as, "One of the finest pieces of architecture".
This plan, however, was abandoned in the face of strong opposition and in 1857 Burlington House was occupied by the Royal Society, the Linnean Society and the Chemical Society (later the Royal Society of Chemistry).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Burlington_House   (1001 words)

  
 Earl of Burlington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Earl of Burlington is a title in the peerage of the United Kingdom.
George Augustus Henry Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington (son of the 4th Duke of Devonshire and Lady Charlotte Boyle.
William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Burlington and 7th Duke of Devonshire grandson of the 1st Earl and cousin and heir presumptive of the 6th Duke of Devonshire, to which title he succeeded in 1858.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lord+Burlington   (450 words)

  
 Plante & Hanley, P.C., lawyers in White River Junction, VT, Vermont   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Lord said that by the fall of 1989 he suspected Lois had radiculopathy: pain in one body part that indicates a problem at the nerve's root in the spine.
Lord visited Tarczewski in the hospital, she testified, though she was still drugged enough from the surgeries not to recall the exact date.
Lord was not the sole orthopedic surgeon during all of this time, but according to federal Form 990 filings, which are public records of nonprofit organizations' finances, Lord's contribution in 1999 brought him a salary and benefits of $172,525.
www.lawyers.com /plantehanley/Tarcziewski-Articles.jsp   (9399 words)

  
 KODAK: Education - Enhancing Learning in the Biology Laboratory
Lord analyzed the outcomes of his project using three types of evaluative measures: (1) Students were tested at the beginning and end of the 15-week semester on their image formation and control potentials.
Lord concludes that the use of sequential photos does, indeed, enhance student learning and possibly facilitates the translation of external events into mental pictorial images.
Lord suggests that the incorporation of photography into the biology lab would be relatively simple if student or school cameras and the slide projector and screen were available.
www.kodak.com /global/en/consumer/education/lessonPlans/lessonPlan108.shtml   (536 words)

  
 RA :: SPRING 2004 :: Culture in a cold climate   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
But not everyone found it comfortable: Lord Hervey exclaimed that the Siberians did not enjoy their brief summer, ‘notwithstanding they live in a chilled climate, where light and warmth are as great strangers as in a home of Lord Burlington’s building’.
Dorothy Burlington was cousin of that doyen of manners, Lord Chesterfield, but she was strong-minded, wilful and extravagant (when she was at Bath she hired the entire playhouse to put on a play for seventeen friends, and she fumed when she lost her snuffbox at cards).
In 1770, Burlington House was leased to the Duke of Portland, Devonshire’s brother-in-law, and Prime Minister in 1783 and 1807.
www.ramagazine.org.uk /index.php?pid=75   (1518 words)

  
 Images of Chiswick House by Lord Burlington
Burlington was recognized during his time (admittedly in part by his friends) as "The Apollo of the Arts" (Horace Walpole), a "modern Vitruvius" (Daniel Defoe), and "the Palladio and [Inigo] Jones of our times" (Scipio Maffei and Alexander Pope) (Harris, 5, 19).
Burlington had seen Palladio's Rotonda in Vicenza, but scholars attribute Burlington's particular debt to Palladio's student, Vincenzo Scamozzi, especially his Rocca Pisani near Vicenza as well as his Villa Molini.
Harris explains that Burlington saw in Palladio's Palazzo Thiene the "bugnato rustico type of rustication of stone, a sort of vermiculation, with its precedents in the Roman renaissance and antiquity" which Burlington applied "to Chiswick and elsewhere for the first time in England" (63).
www.bluffton.edu /~sullivanm/england/london/chiswick/burlington.html   (967 words)

  
 Burlington Arcade
Lord George lived next door in Burlington House and is rumoured to have built the Arcade to stop the rowdy Londoners of the Regency years from throwing oyster shells into his garden.
Lord George (as he was until he became Lord Burlington and moved into the House of Lords) was considered a progressive politician and survived ten Parliaments as an MP, but his most enduring achievement was the building of The Burlington Arcade.
The Burlington Arcade is situated next to the Royal Academy and opposite Fortnum and Mason, with an entrance on Piccadilly and next to Bond Street.
www.mywestend.co.uk /westend/shops-burlingtonarcade.htm   (586 words)

  
 Plante & Hanley, P.C., lawyers in White River Junction, VT, Vermont   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Lord said that by the fall of 1989 he suspected Lois had radiculopathy: pain in one body part that indicates a problem at the nerve's root in the spine.
Lord visited Tarczewski in the hospital, she testified, though she was still drugged enough from the surgeries not to recall the exact date.
Lord was not the sole orthopedic surgeon during all of this time, but according to federal Form 990 filings, which are public records of nonprofit organizations' finances, Lord's contribution in 1999 brought him a salary and benefits of $172,525.
www.plantehanley.com /Tarcziewski-Articles.jsp   (9399 words)

  
 Earl of Cork   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Lord Cork's subsidiary titles are: Viscount Dungarvan (created 1620), Viscount Boyle of Kinalmeaky (1628), Baron Boyle of Youghal (1616), Baron Boyle of Broghill (1628), Baron Boyle of Bandon Bridge (1628) and Baron Boyle of Marston, of Marston in the County of Somerset (1711).
The courtesy title of Lord Cork's eldest son and heir is Viscount Dungarvan.
In 1664 the 2nd Earl was created Earl of Burlington in the Peerage of England; the subsidiary title of this earldom was Baron Clifford of Lanesborough (1644, Peerage of England).
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/E/Earl-of-Cork.htm   (590 words)

  
 ARTFACT.COM : Find, Price & Research Antiques and Fine Art
On April 17, 1735 Lady Burlington had written to her husband referring to these declaring that 'I hope the signor has remembered about my tables and glasses', 'the signor' being William Kent who was responsible for the interior decoration of the Palladian villa designed by Lord Burlington at Chiswick.
It is clear from the aforementioned letter from Lady Burlington that Kent was aware of the pair of tables and mirrors supplied by Boson, and as the designer of much of the interior of Chiswick House he must have had some considerable influence on their design.
Burlington's protégé was 'promoted' by him on all occasions to everything in his power, to the King, to the court of works, & courtiers declared him the best History painter - and the first native of this kingdom'.
www.artfact.com /artfact/sampleLot.cfm?sample=22   (2800 words)

  
 Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork (April 25, 1694 – December 15, 1753), born in Yorkshire, was a descendant of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork.
The house he designed for himself was demolished.
They were parents to William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire, George Augustus Henry Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington and two other children.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_Boyle,_3rd_Earl_of_Burlington   (1090 words)

  
 RA :: SPRING 2004 :: Beloved by every muse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Burlington House became a centre for the arts, providing those whom the wealthy peer chose to encourage with accommodation and hospitality.
For Burlington’s exemplary ‘use of riches’ was satirically contrasted with the estate of Timon, a tasteless plutocrat: ‘his building is a town/His pond an ocean, his parterre a down’.
By the time Burlington died in 1753, writers as well as artists and musicians were looking to the marketplace rather than the patron for sustenance.
www.ramagazine.org.uk /index.php?pid=76   (783 words)

  
 Lord Burlington: Architecture, Art and Life   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The importance of the third earl of Burlington (1695-1753) as a patron and practitioner of the arts, especially of architecture, has long been recognised.
Lord Burlington: Art, Architecture and Life is an attempt to unravel the life of one of England's most celebrated eighteenth century architects.
Clark's chapter, 'Lord Burlington is here', is full of unsupported supposition and amateurish guesswork that is quite frankly bad history.
www.textkit.com /0_1852850949.html   (186 words)

  
 William Kent Furniture & Biography
Upon returning to England Kent was taken under the wing of Lord Burlington, a fashionable society man who Kent thereafter spent much of his time with.
Lord Burlington, "the Apollo of the Arts, found a proper priest in the person of William Kent" as Horace Walpole says.
Burlington encouraged Kent to become an architect and garden landscaper and also to design furniture suitable for the Palladian style houses that were the fashion among the very wealthy of early eighteenth century England including one of their early collaborations, Chiswick Villa.
www.furniturestyles.net /european/english/william-kent.html   (463 words)

  
 david mihm | online   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
designed in the early 18th century by lord burlington as a country getaway.
burlington was a great art buff wanted to bring the palladian baroque architecture he had seen on one of his tours of italy back to england.
this "house" (the lord never used it for living, only entertainment) is perfectly symmetrical.
wso.williams.edu /~dmihm/semabroad/turnhamgreen.htm   (254 words)

  
 Lord Burlington - Great Buildings Online
Richard Boyle, Third Earl of Burlington and Fourth Earl of Cork, was born in Yorkshire in 1694.
By the early 1720s Burlington had become a practicing architect, employed mostly by fellow members of the aristocracy.
As Lord Treasurer of Ireland, Lord Lieutenant of the East and West Ridings of Yorkshire, a Privy Councillor and a Director of the Royal Academy of Music, he managed to push his architectural views into the forefront.
www.greatbuildings.com /architects/Lord_Burlington.html   (222 words)

  
 PALLADIAN - LoveToKnow Article on PALLADIAN   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In 1716, Richard Boyle, 3rd earl of Burlington, who also admired the works of Pailadio, copied some of them, the front of old Burlington House being more or less a reproduction of the Palazzo Porto at Vicenza, and the villa at Chiswick a copy of the Villa Capua near Vicenza.
It is probably due to Lord Burlington that the title Palladian is the designation for the Italian style as practised in England.
In 1862 Sir Gilbert Scotts Gothic design for the new government offices was rejected and Lord Palmerston selected in preference the Palladian style.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PA/PALLADIAN.htm   (165 words)

  
 [No title]
On July 30th Lord Oxford was dismissed, and the white staff was given to the Duke of Shrewsbury, one of whose first acts was to recall the Tory Ambassador.
Lord Clarendon returned at once to England, and with him came Gay, saddened by the blasting of his hopes of advancement.
Lord Burlington and Lord Chandos each put down his name for fifty copies, Lord Bathurst for ten copies; in all Gay made more than £1,000 by the publication.
www.ibiblio.org /pub/docs/books/gutenberg/1/3/7/9/13790/13790-8.txt   (16160 words)

  
 shannon.htm
Though he usually acted as the Irish government's chief agent in conducting the business of the House of Commons, he was the spearhead of the opposition to the government in the mid-1750s, and won popularity by his resistance to the government's proposal in 1753 to appropriate a surplus in the Irish Treasury.
Estate and financial letters, 1710-1762, relating chiefly to the Shannon estates in Co. Cork, and the Burlington estates in counties Cork and Waterford, of which Henry Boyle was entrusted with the management by the 3rd Earl of Burlington, his brother-in-law.
The correspondents include the Earl of Northumberland, Lord Lieutenant; the Marquess of Buckingham, Lord Lieutenant; Lords Clare, Frankfort, Hardwicke, Inchiquin, Mountmorres, Strangford and Townshend; Lord Amelius Beauclerk; George Chinnery, Bishop of Killaloe; Thomas Orde, Chief Secretary; and members of the Irish and subsequently of the United Kingdom Parliament.
www.proni.gov.uk /records/private/shannon.htm   (1889 words)

  
 Courtesy Titles
If Lord Hartington were to predecease his father, then Lord Burlington would become the Marquess of Hartington, and his son, if he were to have one, would be born as Earl of Burlington.
When Lord Edward marries, his wife will take his title, but since it is merely a prefix to his name, she will be known as Lady Edward Spencer-Churchill.
Lord Sale, as he now is, continues to hold the barony of Ware, and for that matter still holds the original baronetcy if his family started out with one, but again a superior dignity (the earldom, in this case) swallows up the lesser ones (the barony and the baronetcy).
laura.chinet.com /html/titles05.html   (3714 words)

  
 Georgian Index - Gardens
A five-mile ride between Lord Alan Bathurst's townhouse in Cirencester and his country house is still in existence.
Lord Burlington retained Kent to design the interiors of his villa Chiswick, to the west of London, and redesigned the French formal gardens into an idealized natural style.
Burlington was one of the most influential arbiters of taste in 18th century England, both as collector and architect.
www.georgianlife.homestead.com /Files/garden/Gardens.html   (2640 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: An Epistle to Burlington
An Epistle to Burlington, as it is usually known, deals with true and false taste in architecture and landscape gardening in eighteenth-century England.
An Epistle to Burlington was the first poem Pope wrote in the Horatian style that became the dominant model for the rest of his poetic career.
Lord Burlington is worked into the text at various points (23-6, 39-40, 178, 191-4) and addressed in a complimentary manner.
www.litencyc.com /php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=6679   (525 words)

  
 History of Burlington House
By the time he was twenty three, the third Earl was generally regarded as one of the few members of the aristocracy who "have the talent of laying out their own fortunes with propriety, and making their own private judgement contribute to the public ornament".
In 1854, the Government decided to purchase Burlington House for £140,000 and, five years later, instructed the firm of Banks and Barry, (principal architects in the construction of the House of Commons) to prepare a plan for buildings occupying the entire site.
The purpose was to house a new Royal Academy, the University of London, a museum of patented inventions, and to provide accommodation for "at least six of the principal learned and scientific societies who, by past usage, have acquired claims to be lodged at public expense".
www.rsc.org /AboutUs/History/bhhist.asp   (1807 words)

  
 Burlington United Methodist Church -- Burlington, Kansas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The mission of Burlington United Methodist Church is to be a community of believers, loving God and neighbor, striving to make disciples for Jesus Christ.
Burlington United Methodist Church is a family of believers, reaching out and reaching in so that we might show the love of God to each other, to our neighbors, and across the world.
Burlington United Methodist Church was founded in 1857, shortly after the town of Burlington was laid out, and some 3+ years prior to Kansas being granted statehood.The first service was held in an unfinished hotel, and succeeding services in other locations including private homes, until the first building was completed on Hudson Street.
www.gbgm-umc.org /burlington_umc   (683 words)

  
 Hampton Garden Tour '2001 - Itinerary - ICanGarden.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Until the nineteenth century, historians believed that Lord Burlington, who built Chiswick House in the 1720s, was merely the interested owner.
Burlington admired the neo-classical buildings of sixteenth-century Italy, and today Chiswick House is recognised internationally as one of the finest English buildings inspired by the architecture of ancient Rome.
When Lord Mansfield commissioned Robert Adam to remodel Kenwood in the 1760s, it was as a country retreat.
www.icangarden.com /Tours/Hampton2001Itinerary.htm   (2482 words)

  
 Courtesy Titles
If Lord Hartington were to predecease his father, then Lord Burlington would become the Marquess of Hartington, and his son, if he were to have one, would be born as Earl of Burlington.
When Lord Edward marries, his wife will take his title, but since it is merely a prefix to his name, she will be known as Lady Edward Spencer-Churchill.
Lord Sale, as he now is, continues to hold the barony of Ware, and for that matter still holds the original baronetcy if his family started out with one, but again a superior dignity (the earldom, in this case) swallows up the lesser ones (the barony and the baronetcy).
www.chinet.com /~laura/html/titles05.html   (3714 words)

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