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Topic: Louisiana Creole people


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In the News (Wed 23 Jul 14)

  
 Creole - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch
Louisianans who identify themselves as "Creole" are most commonly from historically Francophone communities with some ancestors who came to Louisiana either directly from France or via the French colonies in the Caribbean; those decended from the Acadians of French Canada are more likely to identify themselves as Cajun than Creole.
In this context the word refers to people of any race or mixture thereof who are descended from settlers in Louisiana before it became part of the USA in 1803 with the Louisiana Purchase, or to the culture and cuisine typical of these people.
People of mixed Portuguese and Native ancestry that the Portuguese had contact with since the 15th century but who didn't speak a Portuguese creole are known as mulatos, mestiços, caboclos and pardos.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /creole.htm   (789 words)

  
 Creole
In this context the word refers to people of any race or mixture thereof who are descended from French or Spanish families in Louisiana before it became part of the USA in 1803, or to the culture and cuisine typical of these people.
However, it is now accepted that Creole is a broad ethnic group of people of all races who share a French or Spanish background.
Such groups often speak a creole language, a hybrid language containing elements of at least two languages.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/c/cr/creole.html   (789 words)

  
 The Mexico-Louisiana Creole Connection
These Mexican-Louisiana Creoles are among many who were delighted to make contact with their original heritage and to discover that there are still people with their names and faces here.
Contrary to the Louisiana definition of Creole as anyone born in the colony, historically Mexican Creoles were children or grandchildren of the Spaniards sent by the king of Spain to rule Mexico during its nearly three centuries as a Spanish colony.
Vestiges of Louisiana Creole heritage remain, such as the cultivating of okra and use of it in gumbo,
margaretmedia.com /mexico-creole/connection.htm   (789 words)

  
 Creole Links
According to the Creole Heritage Center located in Natchitoches, Louisiana at Northwestern State University, Creoles are defined as individuals who are generally known as people of mixed French, African, Spanish, and Native American ancestry, most of whom reside in or have familial ties to Louisiana.
In early 19th-century New Orleans, the term Creole was a way that these "born in the colony" cultural groups differentiated themselves from the many Americans who settled in the city after the Louisiana Purchase, and from the waves of German and other immigrants arriving in the area.
Creole Cuisine -Creole cuisine was the creation of the French and Spanish settlers and their Black servants, and it is perhaps the best characterized by the sauces.
www.joebee.com /html/creole.htm   (789 words)

  
 Creole
Always a controversial and confusing term, the word Creole, to put it simply, means many things to many people.
Creoles of African descent exerted a strong influence on Cajun culture (and vice versa), affecting, for example, the Cajuns' music, foodways, and religious practices.
It was during that century that the mixed-race Creoles of Color (or gens de couleur libre, "free persons of color") came into their own as an ethnic group, enjoying many of the legal rights and privileges of whites.
www.cajunculture.com /Other/creole.htm   (789 words)

  
 Louisiana Radio Records
This latest release from one of the oldest bands playing French music in Louisiana is a fine collection of dance and folk songs from the Cajun, Creole, Zarico and Zydeco traditions that is sure to become a favorite.
We're using some powerful new technology by the good people at IntuiSite to create and maintain the Louisiana Radio records website.
And of course last (arguably first) but not least we're currently producing and showcasing recordings of Louisiana artists that are second to none.
www.louisianaradio.com   (789 words)

  
 A Creole American Article
Creoles are among a rich cultural heritage of people, nomatter what label or how they classify themselves; French Creole, Afo-American Creole, White Creole or Indian-American Creole.
Creole parents that are near the age of 40 are about to become grandparents to the future Creoles of America.
In speaking with Creoles in our community, it was taught to them by their parents who they are and who their ancestors were.
www.brothermichael.com /cajun/creole   (789 words)

  
 The Mexico-Louisiana Creole Connection
These Mexican-Louisiana Creoles are among many who were delighted to make contact with their original heritage and to discover that there are still people with their names and faces here.
Contrary to the Louisiana definition of Creole as anyone born in the colony, historically Mexican Creoles were children or grandchildren of the Spaniards sent by the king of Spain to rule Mexico during its nearly three centuries as a Spanish colony.
Vestiges of Louisiana Creole heritage remain, such as the cultivating of okra and use of it in gumbo,
margaretmedia.com /mexico-creole/connection.htm   (2696 words)

  
 Louisiana OPH - Louisiana Tobacco Control Program - News
Conference participants are invited to "laissez le bon temps roulez" during an evening of rich Louisiana heritage - Creole cuisine and zydeco music.
Louisiana ranks sixth in the rate of smoking-related deaths when compared to other states across the nation.
That decline, which means a third fewer young people stand to contract diseases associated with tobacco use, is attributable to a number of factors: growing public awareness of the health dangers associated with tobacco use; public exposure of manipulation by tobacco companies; and higher cigarette prices.
www.oph.dhh.state.la.us /chronicdisease/tobaccocontrol/news52e7.html?story=157   (1002 words)

  
 New Orleans Cuisine: Creole Seasoning Recipe
Louisiana Seafood - An extensive list of seafood vendors from Louisiana!
A lot of people use Tony Chachere's, or Chef Paul's, I like to make my own, it's easy if you have all the spices on hand, and you have control over the heat and salinity.
I'll give links to great Creole & Cajun recipes and sites, as well as some of my own recipes.
neworleanscuisine.blogspot.com /2005/03/creole-seasoning-recipe.html   (378 words)

  
 Phoenix Caribbean Restaurants
Chicken is a very important ingredient in Caribbean cuisine, and the cooking style is close to that of Louisiana creole cuisine.
Caribbean cuisine is really a mix of different cuisines, reflecting the variety of origins people living in the Caribbean counties have.
In essence, it is a fusion of Spanish cuisine, French cuisine, and African cuisine, with many local variations, such as Cuban cuisine.
www.restaurants-guide.net /phoenix-caribbean-restaurants.html   (73 words)

  
 Asteur - La gazette du monde cadien (billingual Cajun French / English)
While I agree that musicians need not be of Louisiana French descent to perform Cajun and Zydeco music, the music performed at a Cajun-Creole music festival must accurately reflect the music of the Cajun and Creole people.
The Louisiana Cajuns, white descendants of the Acadians who were exiled from their homeland of Nova Scotia between 1755-1763, and Creoles, black descendants of French Louisiana, would also be justifiably offended at a Cajun-Creole music festival featuring performers that were not representative of their culture.
The Rotary Club of Simi Sunrise has a responsibility to present the music and the culture of the Cajun and Creole people in a manner that is authentic and balanced or should change the name of the event to reflect their venue more accurately.
www.asteur.org /issue-simi-valley.html   (1546 words)

  
 Cajun French at LSU
It originates in the language spoken by the French and Acadian people who settled in Louisiana from its early period of European colonization in the 17th century through later waves of immigration into the late 19th century.
Today, the French spoken in Louisiana no longer fits the “three type” paradigm but is better characterized as a continuum along which different speakers can be placed or even move among varying degrees of French which is more or less creolized or cajunized.
Cajun French is the term generally used to describe the variety of French spoken in South Louisiana.
www.artsci.lsu.edu /fai/Cajun/definition.html   (916 words)

  
 If I Could Turn My Tongue Like That
Louisiana Creole arose in the 18th century within the colonial agricultural society of French Louisiana.
Thus, Klingler’s study captures Pointe Coupe Louisiana Creole at a point where it is still dear in the hearts of its remaining older speakers but has lost its allure and its usefulness for younger generations, whose lives will be lived in English.
This persistent language is poised, however, to disappear within another two generations: today, all Louisiana Creole speakers also speak English, and almost no families are passing the creole on to their children.
www.olemiss.edu /depts/south/register/spring04/read_3.asp   (916 words)

  
 Creole Links
According to the Creole Heritage Center located in Natchitoches, Louisiana at Northwestern State University, Creoles are defined as individuals who are generally known as people of mixed French, African, Spanish, and Native American ancestry, most of whom reside in or have familial ties to Louisiana.
In early 19th-century New Orleans, the term Creole was a way that these "born in the colony" cultural groups differentiated themselves from the many Americans who settled in the city after the Louisiana Purchase, and from the waves of German and other immigrants arriving in the area.
Although their heritages are different, Cajun and Creole people do share certain similarities of language, religion, music, and cuisine.
www.joebee.com /html/creole.htm   (913 words)

  
 Dictionary to Document Unique French Creole Dialect
"Creole describes the way people live; it's a very rich language and it's got a lot of humor in it, which is rare," he said.
He was the official Creole-speaking representative from Louisiana on the trip, which was sponsored by CODOFIL (the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana), in order to strengthen the ties between the Francophone communities of Louisiana and the Francophone communities in Canada.
He also said that the primary pronunciation influence of Creole comes from the French spoken by slaves brought to Louisiana from Haiti.
www.carencrohighschool.org /LA_Studies/B_Creole/Dictionary.htm   (687 words)

  
 Creole Links
According to the Creole Heritage Center located in Natchitoches, Louisiana at Northwestern State University, Creoles are defined as individuals who are generally known as people of mixed French, African, Spanish, and Native American ancestry, most of whom reside in or have familial ties to Louisiana.
In early 19th-century New Orleans, the term Creole was a way that these "born in the colony" cultural groups differentiated themselves from the many Americans who settled in the city after the Louisiana Purchase, and from the waves of German and other immigrants arriving in the area.
Creole Cuisine-Creole cuisine was the creation of the French and Spanish settlers and their Black servants, and it is perhaps the best characterized by the sauces.
www.joebee.com /html/creole.htm   (913 words)

  
 Creole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Louisianans who identify themselves as "Creole" are most commonly from historically Francophone communities with some ancestors who came to Louisiana either directly from France or via the French colonies in the Caribbean; those descended from the Acadians of French Canada are more likely to identify themselves as Cajun than Creole.
People of mixed Portuguese and native ancestry that Portuguese had contact since the 15th century, and who spoke a Portuguese Creole language.
People of mixed Portuguese and Native ancestry that the Portuguese had contact with since the 15th century but who didn't speak a Portuguese creole are known as mulatos, mestiços, caboclos and pardos.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Creole   (1391 words)

  
 Introduction to Louisiana
The Creole State : This nickname refers to the people of Louisiana of French and Spanish descent and also to the culture they have preserved.
With her rich heritage of Creole, Cajun, and French, Louisiana life is spiced up with foods like gumbo, andouille, etouffees, sauce piquantes, cayenne pepper, Tabasco, and crawfish.
People who live in or come from Louisiana are called Louisianians or Louisianans.
www.netstate.com /states/intro/la_intro.htm   (1391 words)

  
 Creole and Cajun Cuisine
Creole cuisine, then, is that melange of artistry and talent of cooking, developed and made possible by the people of various nations and cultures who settled in and around New Orleans, and is kept alive by Louisiana sharing it with the rest of the world.
South Louisiana has two unique cuisines: the Creole cuisine with its rich array of courses indicating its close tie to European aristocracy, and Cajun cuisine with its one potmeals, pungent with the flavor of seafood and game.
The Creoles were the European born aristocrats, wooed by the Spanish to establish New Orleans in the 1690's.
www.landrystuff.com /cuisine.html   (1404 words)

  
 Cajun and Creole Cuisine
"My family came to Louisiana in the 1740's and they were rather prominent people.
Rice was introduced to Louisiana in 1718, largely to substitute the wheat that was unable to prosper as a local crop.
This hot pepper was introduced to Louisiana in the mid 1840's by the veterans of the Mexican-American War who brought back the seeds of this Native American plant.
www.uwf.edu /tprewitt/sofood/cajun.htm   (4413 words)

  
 Louisiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Louisiana is home to two distinct cultures: the non-Anglo Creole and the French-speaking Cajun.
Louisiana's French settlements contributed to further exploration and outposts, concentrated along the banks of the Mississippi and its major tributaries, from Louisiana to as far north as the region called the Illinois Country, around Peoria, Illinois and present-day St.
The Atakapa in southwestern Louisiana in Vermilion, Cameron, Lafayette, Acadia, Jefferson Davis, and Calcasieu parishes.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Louisiana   (3947 words)

  
 Creole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Louisianans who identify themselves as "Creole" are most commonly from historically Francophone communities with some ancestors who came to Louisiana either directly from France or via the French colonies in the Caribbean; those descended from the Acadians of French Canada are more likely to identify themselves as Cajun than Creole.
The term Creole and its relatives in other languages — such as crioulo, criollo, créole, kriolu, criol, kreyol, kriulo, kriol, krio, etc. — have been applied to people in different countries and epochs, with rather different meanings.
In the Caribbean region, the term Creole is used to describe anyone, regardless of race or ethnicity, who was born and raised in the region.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Creole   (1452 words)

  
 Benzie Playboyz cajun zydeco creole music
Creole and Zydeco music of Southwest Louisiana, with a bit of rockin' blues, we get people up and on their feet, show after show.
A benefit dance to raise funds to help Louisiana artists and preserve the musical heritage of New Orleans and the surrounding gulf coast communities will be hosted by the Cabbage Shed in Elberta, Michigan on Sunday, the 13 th of November, from 3 pm until 9 pm.
A local band that performs Cajun and Zydeco music, K.Jones and the Benzie Playboyz, will perform in the southwest Louisiana tradition.
www.benzieplayboyz.com   (206 words)

  
 Haitian Creole --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Louisiana Creole, which is closely related to Haitian Creole, should not be confused with either Louisiana provincial standard French, spoken by the descendants of the French upper classes in and around New Orleans, nor with the language of the Cajuns; both of the latter are dialects of...
Examples are Gullah (derived from English) spoken in the Sea Islands of South Carolina, U.S., Haitian Creole (derived from French), Krio (derived from English) spoken in Sierra Leone, Louisiana Creole (derived from French), Melanesian Pidgin (derived from English), Sranantonga...
French-based creole language spoken on the island of Hispaniola, in the Caribbean Sea.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9038824   (206 words)

  
 Introduction to Louisiana
The Creole State: This nickname refers to the people of Louisiana of French and Spanish descent and also to the culture they have preserved.
People who live in or come from Louisiana are called Louisianians or Louisianans.
Louisiana is another state, along with Illinois, that bears the mark of Robert Cavelier Sieur de La Salle.
www.netstate.com /states/intro/la_intro.htm   (905 words)

  
 92.02.02: French Creoles in Louisiana: An American Tale
A Creole is a n ‘white person descended from the French or Spanish settlers of Louisiana and the Gulf States and preserving their characteristic speech and culture.’.
The people who could trace their noble ancestors called themselves “Creole.” Others were “chacas” or tradesmen, “chacalatas” or countryfolk (peasants), or “chacumas” for anyone with Black blood.
The students might study Creole holidays and celebrations typical of Louisiana.
www.yale.edu /ynhti/curriculum/units/1992/2/92.02.02.x.html   (6459 words)

  
 Creole Music
Savor a typical 19th century Louisiana Creole salon with this first ever recording of music written by New Orleans Creole composers of classical music of that time.
Get a copy of Gumbo People and you can follow along with the CD in Spanish, French Creole, French, Haitian Creole or English.
CD's of Creole music as it was sung and played in New Orleans in the 1800's.
margaretmedia.com /cds   (442 words)

  
 Louisiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Louisiana is home to two distinct cultures: the non-Anglo Creole and the French-speaking Cajun.
Louisiana's French settlements contributed to further exploration and outposts, concentrated along the banks of the Mississippi and its major tributaries, from Louisiana to as far north as the region called the Illinois Country, around Peoria, Illinois and present-day Saint Louis, Missouri.
Louisiana was inhabited by Native Americans when European explorers arrived in the 17th Century and settlement and colonization began in the 18th Century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Louisiana   (3651 words)

  
 Introduction to Louisiana
The Creole State: This nickname refers to the people of Louisiana of French and Spanish descent and also to the culture they have preserved.
People who live in or come from Louisiana are called Louisianians or Louisianans.
Louisiana is another state, along with Illinois, that bears the mark of Robert Cavelier Sieur de La Salle.
www.netstate.com /states/intro/la_intro.htm   (3651 words)

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